How Silicon Valley Elite Store Billions of Dollars Worth of Bitcoin






How Silicon Valley Elite Store Billions of Dollars Worth of Bitcoin


May 9th, 2018

Via: Bloomberg:

Behind the guards, the blast doors and down corridors of reinforced concrete, sit the encrypted computer servers — connected to nothing — that hold keys to a vast digital fortune.

Argentine entrepreneur Wences Casares has spent the past several years persuading Silicon Valley millionaires and billionaires that Bitcoin is the global currency of the future, that they need to buy some, and that he’s the man to safeguard it. His startup, Xapo, has built a network of underground vaults on five continents, including one in a decommissioned Swiss military bunker.















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Source Article from http://www.cryptogon.com/?p=52753

The Great Lakes’ biggest problem: Decades’ worth of pollution has altered the fish


Image: The Great Lakes’ biggest problem: Decades’ worth of pollution has altered the fish

(Natural News)
In the 1960s, the Cuyahoga River became infamous for becoming so polluted that it regularly caught fire. Now it suffers a different, subtler kind of water pollution. Decades of discharging chemicals into the waters of the Great Lakes have altered the hormones and metabolism of fish found in the Cuyahoga and two other rivers, according to an article on Great Lakes Echo.

Researchers warn that water pollution has caused changes in fish that live in the Great Lakes. A recent study covered 16 sites in three rivers, each of which emptied into a different lake, and found out that all three lakes contained high amounts of chemicals.

It comes as no surprise that the most affected river is the Cuyahoga, which flows through Cleveland and into Lake Erie. Many consider it to be a visible symbol of water pollution that prompted Congress to pass the Clean Water Act in 1972. (Related: Chemical contamination discovered in water supply at North Carolina military base… experts warn this could be the first of many.)

The Cuyahoga no longer catches fire, but it is still heavily polluted. Researcher Heiko Schoenfuss of the  St. Cloud State University says today’s pollutants include the likes of shampoo, laundry detergent, pesticides, and hormones.

His research team at the Aquatic Toxicology Laboratory tracked many of the pollutants to their sources. Depending on their locations, each site displayed different levels of concentration of water pollutants.

Hormones and pesticides come from farmlands, while other chemicals come from cities

Sites in upstream areas are located near agricultural regions. They show high levels of hormones fed to livestock and pesticide runoff from farmlands.

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Downstream regions are heavily urbanized. The sites there contain large amounts of discharged chemicals from home septic systems and wastewater treatment plants.

Schoenfuss says the water pollutants are not directly lethal to fish in the rivers and Great Lakes. Instead, they cause small chemical changes in the reproductive and metabolic hormones of fish. These small changes will pile up as time passes by until they finally cause a negative effect on the ecosystem.

A good way to imagine this long-term effect is fiddling with your home thermostat. If someone raised or lowered the temperature by a couple of degrees, you might not notice it until the end of the month, when your bill arrives.

Schoenfuss assures fishermen that fish caught in the waters of the Great Lakes and their rivers remain safe to eat for now. He even says he would eat one fished out of the Cuyahoga itself.

The Cuyahoga has made big progress, but it still has a long way to go

Long-time Cleveland resident Agnieszka Wooten believes the Cuyahoga River has come a long way since the first time she saw it 30 years ago. She relates how animals avoided the river when she moved into the area.

Several years after she settled in and the Clean Water Act started to make real progress, Wooten noticed bald eagles, beavers, and otters began reappearing near the Cuyahoga. She believed the river water became clean enough for the animals at that point.

Wooten herself often goes on hikes through the riverside or paddles boats in the Cuyahoga.

Michael Murray, a researcher with the National Wildlife Federation, confirms that the water quality in the Cuyahoga has vastly improved. The return of the bald eagle is significant because the species is very sensitive to pollution.

Local residents remained worried about pollution, especially if it can be seen with the naked eye. Wooten says she comes across trash like condoms, plastic bottles, and sanitary napkins during her hikes upstream, especially after heavy rains.

Find out if your river or lake is safe at CleanWater.news.

Sources include:

GreatLakesEcho.org

ScienceDirect.com

 

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Source Article from http://www.naturalnews.com/2018-05-05-great-lakes-biggest-problem-decades-worth-of-pollution-altered-fish.html

WATCH: CNN’s Wolf Blitzer Says Slaughtering Kids in Yemen is Worth It Because It Creates Jobs

yemenyemen

The current conflict in Yemen, which was manufactured as a proxy war by Saudi Arabia, targeting its bitter enemy, Iran, is America’s dirty little secret which the media refuses to question. According to an analysis from Unicef, more than 5,000 children have been slaughtered in the war, with the death toll from violence alone surpassing 10,000—as millions teeter on the brink of starvation. The number of casualties has only continued to increase, as a report from the United Nations noted that the parties involved are conducting operations “heedless of their impact on civilians.”

As The Free Thought Project has reported, the current situation in Yemen is nothing short of genocide, as there are 7 million civilians in starvation, and 19 million out of the country’s 27 million population in need of some form of aid.” Saudi Arabia has repeatedly facilitated famine, continued to murder children, and all of it is with the help and approval of the United States.

Just last week, TFTP reported on a bombing that took place at a wedding near Yemen’s capital city of Sana’a. A report from the Associated Press which barely registered as a blip in the rest of the media claimed that the majority of people who were killed were “women and children who were gathered in one of the tents set up for the wedding party in the district of Bani Qayis.”

The bride was killed and the groom was one of more than 50 people who was wounded. Ali Nasser al-Azib, deputy head of the hospital, told the AP that at least 30 children were among the injured—several are suffering from shrapnel wounds and severed limbs, and are in critical condition.

The AP reported that this bombing is the third that has targeted Yemeni civilians in as many days—an entire family of five was killed after an airstrike hit their house on Sunday, and at least 20 civilians were killed after an airstrike hit a commuter bus leaving the war-torn district of Mowza.

As Glenn Greenwald pointed out last week. This most recent slaughter of innocent women and children comes after Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman went on a publicity tour across the United States, meeting with elites from all sides of the political spectrum and industry.

As the Yemen war enters its fourth year of being ignored by the media, RT’s In the Now has republished a forgotten clip from 2016 in which CNN’s Wolf Blitzer interviews Rand Paul. The clip is nothing short of chilling and explains why the media and politicians continue to ignore the war, while silently supporting it—the slaughter of innocent children is good for business.

As the clip begins, Rand Paul is explaining that “There are now millions of displaced people in Yemen. They’re refugees. So we supply the Saudis with arms, they create havoc and refugees in Yemen. Then what’s the answer? Then we’re going to take the Yemeni refugees in the United States? Maybe we ought to quit arming both sides of this war.”

To give specific details of the US involvement in the slaughter of children, Paul noted, “We are refueling the Saudi bombers that are dropping the bombs. It is said that thousands of civilians have died in Yemen because of this.”

CNN’s Blitzer responded, “So for you this is a moral issue. Because you know, there’s a lot of jobs at stake. Certainly if a lot of these defense contractors stop selling war planes, other sophisticated equipment to Saudi Arabia, there’s going to be a significant loss of jobs, of revenue here in the United States. That’s secondary from your standpoint?”

Paul countered, “Well not only is it a moral question, its a constitutional question.” And noted that it was Obama who partnered with Saudi Arabia to wage war on Yemen without Congressional approval. “Our founding fathers very directly and specifically did not give the president the power to go to war. They gave it to Congress. So Congress needs to step up and this is what I’m doing.”

Since this original report aired, the admitted scope of the US role in Yemen has become far greater than just bombs and refueling. The Defense Department released a statement in December 2017, in which it admitted for the first time that U.S. forces have conducted “multiple ground operations and more than 120 strikes this year” in Yemen.

Sadly, this slaughter shows no signs of slowing and is arguably getting worse.

Only a few weeks into his presidency, Donald Trump made clear his policy of continuing the annihilation and genocide of the citizens of Yemen. Following in Barack Obama’s footsteps, Trump launched an attack on Yemen only days after taking office which led to the death of multiple civilians, including women and children.

Among the dead was the 8-year-old granddaughter of Nasser al-Awlaki, Nawar Anwar al-Awlaki, who was also the daughter of Anwar Awlaki — a US citizen extrajudicially murdered by the Obama administration. Nasser al-Awlaki explained that his granddaughter was shot in the neck and suffered for hours as she bled to death.

Nawar’s death epitomizes the rapacious and savage nature of the US presence in Yemen and their continued aid to the terrorist nation of Saudi Arabia who indiscriminately bombs schools, hospitals, and civilian neighborhoods within the nation.

And all of it, according to CNN and the rest of the military industrial complex—is good for business.

DASH cryptocurrency and The Free Thought Project have formed a partnership that will continue to spread the ideas of peace and freedom while simultaneously teaching people how to operate outside of the establishment systems of control like using cryptocurrency instead of dollars. Winning this battle is as simple as choosing to abstain from the violent corrupt old system and participating in the new and peaceful system that hands the power back to the people. DASH is this system.

DASH digital cash takes the control the banking elite has over money and gives it back to the people. It is the ultimate weapon in the battle against the money changers and information controllers.

If you’d like to start your own DASH wallet and be a part of this change and battle for peace and freedom, you can start right here. DASH is already accepted by vendors all across the world so you can begin using it immediately.

Source Article from https://thefreethoughtproject.com/cnn-yemen-war-good-business/

How many LEGO skyscrapers could be built from a year’s worth of ocean plastic?

TIME crunches the numbers to determine how many life-size skyscrapers could be built with ocean plastic turned into LEGO bricks.

OK first things first, this little experiment does not imply that there are skyscrapers’ worth of LEGO bits in the ocean, because who throws away LEGOs? (Yes, sometimes they get shipwrecked, but that’s another story.) However, LEGOs or not, the oceans are becoming increasingly chock-full of plastic.

Research published this year reveals that a mere 9 percent of plastics are currently recycled; meanwhile, plastic use is expected to double in the next 20 years as “as manufacturers find new and varied uses for the material, according to a report from the World Economic Forum (WEF),” writes TIME magazine. As Lloyd points out, the fossil fuel industry is sinking all kinds of money into new plastic-making facilities, promising that the poor beleageuered planet will continue choking on the eternal stuff into the foreseeable forever.

Most of us know by now the staggering amount of plastic waste that ends up in the oceans; but to hear that 8 million tons of plastic finds its way into our seas annually … well, what exactly does that look like?

So this is where TIME comes in, with a little (big) experiment, asking: “If all the plastic that winds up in the ocean over a single year was molded into LEGO bricks, how many life-size skyscrapers could you build with them?”

Figuring that the standard LEGO brick weighs 2.32 grams, that 8-million-tons of plastic-bonanza waste would create a mind-spinning 3.4 quadrillion such blocks. They then did a simulation and built a pretend full-scale replica of NYC’s Empire State Building with said imagined bricks.

The typical 2-by-4 block is 31.8 millimeters long by 15.8 millimeters wide and 9.6 millimeters tall. The way LEGOs stack together leaves a tiny amount of space between them, so this simulation treats the length as 32mm by 16mm. Our life-size LEGO Empire State Buildings have a volume of about 900,000 cubic meters, close to that of the real thing.

The final tally? NINETEEN life-size Empire State Buildings. If you’ve ever stood anywhere near this iconic skyscraper, you know how massive it is. It has a footprint of approximately two acres and is comprised of 102 stories; and we allow 19 times that amount of plastic – in teeny-tiny bits – to enter our oceans each year. It’s really pretty profound.

You can see the simulation over at TIME, it’s a very good visual … and a great reminder to curtail plastic use, especially single-use plastics and products containing microbeads (which basically go straight from sink and shower to sea).

See related stories below for more on plastic.

Source Article from https://www.treehugger.com/plastic/how-many-skyscrapers-could-be-built-years-worth-ocean-plastic.html

This is what a year’s worth of plastic looks like

Daniel Webb’s project is a profound reminder that “there is no away” when it comes to plastic trash.

Starting on 1 January 2017, Daniel Webb stashed every piece of plastic he bought or received in his spare room. After 365 days, the room was full and Webb’s experiment was complete; he now had a tangible record of what an average British guy’s plastic consumption for one year looks like.

Why would one want to do such a thing? Well, for starters, Webb seems like the kind of guy who tackles ambitious projects; the Guardian recounts that he once ran six half-marathons in six days. But mainly, the project happened because Webb felt deeply afflicted by the amount of plastic pollution in his coastal town of Margate, England. He describes walking along the beach:

“Old toys, probably 20 years old, bottles that must have been from overseas because they had all kinds of different languages on them, bread tags, which I don’t think had been used for years. It was very nostalgic, almost archaeological. And it made me think, as a mid-30s guy, is any of my plastic out there? Had I once dropped a toy in a stream near Wolverhampton, where I’m from, and now it was out in the sea?”

So, Webb decided to do a plastic collection experiment. Without changing his shopping habits at all (though he’d already given up plastic water bottles), he kept every piece of plastic in order to document a year’s worth of consumption. The total number came to 4,490. Sixty percent of that was food packaging and 93 percent was single-use plastic. Only eight items, mostly coffee cups, were made from biodegradable plastics.

salad bags© Ollie Harrop 2018 / Courtesy of Everyday Plastic

The project was carefully photographed by Ollie Harrop and named “Everyday Plastic.” The pictures reveal personal lifestyle habits; Webb clearly likes his chips and candy, but also went through plenty of cellophane bags for salad greens, broad beans, and netted bags of citrus. Then there are the familiar plastics that we all encounter on a daily basis, such as coffee cup lids, blister packs, toothpaste tubes, and milk jugs.

Everyday Plastic laid out© Ollie Harrop 2018 / Courtesy of Everyday Plastic

“Everyday Plastic” has now been transformed into an impressive mural, hanging at Margate’s Dreamland amusement park until May 21st:

“Having laid out all of the plastic to the exact size of the billboard, the piece was photographed by Ollie Harrop using a 5m high by 6m wide rig and the items were captured at actual size. The final piece measures 12.5m wide by 4m tall, and such was the volume of plastic, it required 20 individual photos to be taken and then stitched together in post-production by Ian Hall.”

Webb, who no doubt will be very glad to get his spare room back, learned some important lessons from the project. He realized the power of marketing to encourage people to buy things. He told the Guardian:

“That black plastic of meat packaging is to hide the colour of the blood, or the brown plastic of mushroom packaging makes the mushrooms look earthy.” He laughs. “I work in marketing, and I never thought I’d say this, but we really are being sold stuff we do not need. There is an epidemic of overproduction and overconsumption.”

Everyday Plastic© Ollie Harrop 2018 / Courtesy of Everyday Plastic

He also realized the pointlessness of recycling, which is something we’ve been reiterating on TreeHugger for years. Out of his entire collection, a mere 56 items were made from recycled plastic, proving that improving recycling rates is not the best goal. What we need is to “find ways of using less.”

While I do think we’ve reached the end of needing such year-long personal experiments to prove that consumption habits need to change, there is something powerful about seeing Webb’s waste and realizing that he represents all of us. If his disturbing mural can trigger a behavioral shift, then it’s a good thing.

Source Article from https://www.treehugger.com/plastic/what-years-worth-plastic-looks.html

This is what a year’s worth of plastic looks like

Daniel Webb’s project is a profound reminder that “there is no away” when it comes to plastic trash.

Starting on 1 January 2017, Daniel Webb stashed every piece of plastic he bought or received in his spare room. After 365 days, the room was full and Webb’s experiment was complete; he now had a tangible record of what an average British guy’s plastic consumption for one year looks like.

Why would one want to do such a thing? Well, for starters, Webb seems like the kind of guy who tackles ambitious projects; the Guardian recounts that he once ran six half-marathons in six days. But mainly, the project happened because Webb felt deeply afflicted by the amount of plastic pollution in his coastal town of Margate, England. He describes walking along the beach:

“Old toys, probably 20 years old, bottles that must have been from overseas because they had all kinds of different languages on them, bread tags, which I don’t think had been used for years. It was very nostalgic, almost archaeological. And it made me think, as a mid-30s guy, is any of my plastic out there? Had I once dropped a toy in a stream near Wolverhampton, where I’m from, and now it was out in the sea?”

So, Webb decided to do a plastic collection experiment. Without changing his shopping habits at all (though he’d already given up plastic water bottles), he kept every piece of plastic in order to document a year’s worth of consumption. The total number came to 4,490. Sixty percent of that was food packaging and 93 percent was single-use plastic. Only eight items, mostly coffee cups, were made from biodegradable plastics.

salad bags© Ollie Harrop 2018 / Courtesy of Everyday Plastic

The project was carefully photographed by Ollie Harrop and named “Everyday Plastic.” The pictures reveal personal lifestyle habits; Webb clearly likes his chips and candy, but also went through plenty of cellophane bags for salad greens, broad beans, and netted bags of citrus. Then there are the familiar plastics that we all encounter on a daily basis, such as coffee cup lids, blister packs, toothpaste tubes, and milk jugs.

Everyday Plastic laid out© Ollie Harrop 2018 / Courtesy of Everyday Plastic

“Everyday Plastic” has now been transformed into an impressive mural, hanging at Margate’s Dreamland amusement park until May 21st:

“Having laid out all of the plastic to the exact size of the billboard, the piece was photographed by Ollie Harrop using a 5m high by 6m wide rig and the items were captured at actual size. The final piece measures 12.5m wide by 4m tall, and such was the volume of plastic, it required 20 individual photos to be taken and then stitched together in post-production by Ian Hall.”

Webb, who no doubt will be very glad to get his spare room back, learned some important lessons from the project. He realized the power of marketing to encourage people to buy things. He told the Guardian:

“That black plastic of meat packaging is to hide the colour of the blood, or the brown plastic of mushroom packaging makes the mushrooms look earthy.” He laughs. “I work in marketing, and I never thought I’d say this, but we really are being sold stuff we do not need. There is an epidemic of overproduction and overconsumption.”

Everyday Plastic© Ollie Harrop 2018 / Courtesy of Everyday Plastic

He also realized the pointlessness of recycling, which is something we’ve been reiterating on TreeHugger for years. Out of his entire collection, a mere 56 items were made from recycled plastic, proving that improving recycling rates is not the best goal. What we need is to “find ways of using less.”

While I do think we’ve reached the end of needing such year-long personal experiments to prove that consumption habits need to change, there is something powerful about seeing Webb’s waste and realizing that he represents all of us. If his disturbing mural can trigger a behavioral shift, then it’s a good thing.

Source Article from https://www.treehugger.com/plastic/what-years-worth-plastic-looks.html

US war with North Korea ‘worth it’ – Lindsey Graham

“All the damage that would come from a war would be worth it in terms of long-term stability and national security,” the Republican senator from South Carolina told CNN. “I’m completely convinced that President Trump and his team reject the policy of containment… They’ve drawn a red line here and it is to never let North Korea build a nuclear-tipped missile to hit America.”

Graham’s comments come as the US is reportedly considering military action against North Korea, should Pyongyang build a nuclear missile capable of striking the US, according to multiple sources, CNN reports.

Last week, Washington revealed its latest round of sanctions against North Korea for its nuclear and ballistic missile tests, targeting Pyongyang’s shipping industry. Trump warned a phase two could be “very, very unfortunate for the world.”

The US appears at odds with the apparent willingness of both North and South Korea to engage in dialogue following the Winter Olympic Games, which saw North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s sister, Kim Yo-jong, attending. Kim Yo-jung was the first member of North Korea’s ruling family to visit the South since the Korean War, and shook hands with South Korean President Moon Jae-in at the opening ceremony.

On Thursday, Moon told Trump he plans to send an envoy to North Korea following the invitation extended by Pyongyang. This would be the first inter-Korean summit since 2007. South Korea said in a statement that dialogue with the North “will go on.”

Graham, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, is a longtime hawk who has often advocated for US military action, including calling for the US to send 10,000 troops to fight Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS) in Iraq. He was also among the chorus of Republican presidential candidates calling for the US to shoot down Russian planes in Syria in 2015.  

Curiously, Graham is aware of the devastation a conflict between the US and North Korea would create in the region. Speaking on the Today show in August, Graham noted: “Japan, South Korea, China would all be in the crosshairs of a war if we started one with North Korea.”

“If there’s going to be a war to stop [Kim Jong-un], it will be over there. If thousands die, they’re going to die over there. They’re not going to die here,” he added. “And [Trump] told me that to my face. That may be provocative, but not really. When you’re president of the United States, where does your allegiance lie? To the people of the United States.”

During the Korean War of 1950-53, an estimated 2.5 million people died. Should the US enter a war with North Korea, the conflict would likely have disastrous consequences for the greater region and endanger US citizens.

Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!

Source Article from https://www.rt.com/usa/420367-north-korea-war-worth-it-graham/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=RSS

Fort Worth Are Paying Homeless People To Help Clean Its City’s Streets


By Fattima Mahdi Truth Theory

Fort Worth, Texas is one of the fastest growing cities in the U.S. and they have a brilliant program in place to help homeless people get back on their feet – Clean State. This program is funded by the city and run by Presbyterian Night Shelter.

In 2017, 40 homeless people were given jobs in Texas. They were paid $10 an hour to collect trash, received benefits such as paid vacation and were also given training so that they could permanently transition into the workforce. One employee, Frank Crist, who had spent almost two years in a shelter said that program had helped him move into an apartment. “It took me about a year, a year-and-a-half, but everything is coming together,” he said.

The workers have collected almost 4,000 tons of trash in a year. “We want a clean neighborhood that speaks hope, that speaks dignity to our homeless guests,” explains CEO of the Presbyterian Night Shelter, Toby Owen. “And it also provides income for these individuals so they can move out and be successful without living in a homeless shelter.”

“They’ve been very responsible, in fact, maybe a little more responsible than your everyday employee that gets hired because they feel like there’s something that they need to prove. That’s how appreciative they are,” said Brandon Bennett, Director of City of Fort Worth. “This is the first real-paying job that most of them had in a very long time” he continued.

It’s important to note that Clean State isn’t the first program of its kind. Chicago, Denver and Portland have similar programs that employ homeless people. These programs are giving individuals a fresh start, as well as ending the cycle of poverty.

Get free copy of our 33 Page Illustrated eBook- Psychology Meets Spirituality- Secrets To A Supercharged Life You Control!

Source Article from https://truththeory.com/2018/02/27/fort-worth-paying-homeless-people-help-clean-citys-streets/

Telemundo: A Whole Seven Seconds’ Worth Of Balance

Our domestic Spanish-language news networks march forward with their anti-Second Amendment biases on the back of the horrendous school shooting at Parkland, Florida. However, Telemundo managed to find a whole seven seconds for a pro-Second Amendment voice…in the spirit of balance.

Here’s NRA TV host and commentator Gabby Franco, weighing in on President Trump’s proposal to arm certain educators and school staff as part of a school-hardening initiative:

GABBY FRANCO, COMMENTATOR, NRATV: We have security at the banks. We have security at the Capitol. We have security at the White House, and we don’t protect the children.

Telemundo simply listed Franco as “supports firearms”. However, according to her NRA TV profile:

Tips & Tactics host and NRA News Commentator Gabby Franco is an NRA certified firearms instructor and former contestant on the History Channel’s Top Shot. At the age of 19, the Venezuelan native was the first female to qualify for the Venezuelan Olympic Shooting Team, representing her country at the 2000 Sydney Olympics. In 2002, Gabby moved to the U.S. and she is passionate about her Second Amendment freedoms — having seen firsthand what happens in a country where the government strips its citizens of their rights.

Franco is uniquely equipped and qualified to clearly communicate the importance of preserving our Second Amendment rights, and to warn against the dangers of civilian disarmament. The most recent such initiative was in Franco’s native Venezuela, where a gun grab in the aftermath of dictator Hugo Chavez’ death paved the way for the abuses and atrocities now unfolding before us.

I’m sure that Franco had a lot more to say in what appears to be a studio interview but Telemundo saw fit only to air this seven-second clip within was a full two-minute report.

Even worse, these seven seconds of Gabby Franco are pretty much the entirety of pro-Second Amendment viewpoints broadcast on our domestic Spanish-language since the Parkland shooting.

Ironically, a vast majority of U.S. Hispanics came from (or descended from those who came from) places where there has long been gun control, with disastrous results- whether it is the PRI’s “perfect dictatorship” in Mexico, the murderous Castro Regime in Cuba, the Castro puppet Maduro in Venezuela, or U.S. territory Puerto Rico, with a high crime rate despite gun laws every bit as onerous, if not more so, than Washington, D.C. or Chicago,

The shameful silencing of pro-Second Amendment vioces on Spanish-language news media continues apace, these seven seconds notwithstanding.

 

 

 

 

 

Source Article from https://www.newsbusters.org/blogs/latino/jorge-bonilla/2018/02/24/telemundo-whole-seven-seconds-worth-balance