The Three Tricks To Lucid Dreaming: ‘Reality Checking’, ‘Wake back to bed’ and ‘M.I.L.D’


By Fattima Mahdi Truth Theory

Some of us have heard of lucid dreaming, either through articles like these or through our own friends, but haven’t yet had the experience. For those of us who haven’t, it can be quite frustrating to read and hear the many fascinating stories surrounding this wonderous phenomenon while we struggle to create those experiences for ourselves.

The good news is there’s still hope. A research team led by Dr Denholm Aspy of the University of Adelaide, Australia, had 24 volunteers test out different lucid dream induction techniques and this is what they found:

  • Reality testing, which is pretty self explanatory, is a process in which you scan your mean environment several times a day to check whether or not you’re dreaming. In building this habit you prepare yourself to perform the same action within a dream, at which point you become aware of your cerebral state and are, thus, able to take control.
  • Wake back to bed. This involves waking up after five hours, staying awake for a short period of time and falling back to sleep, quickly putting yourself in a REM state, in which you’re more likely to dream. At this point, you have an opportunity to bring trick #1 into play.
  • M.I.L.D. (Mnemonic Induction of Lucid Dreams) is, in short, the combining of tricks #1 and #2. You wake up after five hours of sleep and, before falling into REM state, you repeat the phrase ‘the next time I’m dreaming, I will remember that I’m dreaming’ and imagine yourself in a lucid dream.

The volunteers tried a combination of these techniques for a week, before spending another ‘baseline’ week not practicing the techniques. The experiment revealed that employing these techniques to induce a lucid dream state results in a 17 percent success rate.

Remember, practice makes perfect. If you’re unable to achieve the lucid dream state on your first few attempts, that doesn’t mean you’re unable to lucid dream, that means you need more practice. It is a state that requires a lot of control and self awareness, both of which can be built and improved upon.

Image Credit: Copyright: captblack76 / 123RF Stock Photo

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Source Article from https://truththeory.com/2018/02/28/three-tricks-lucid-dreaming-reality-checking-wake-back-bed-m-l-d/

You are being conned: Former Big Food ad exec unveils marketing tricks used by food manufacturers that persuade you to “super-size it”

Image: You are being conned: Former Big Food ad exec unveils marketing tricks used by food manufacturers that persuade you to “super-size it”

(Natural News)
Many believe in the saying “bigger is better”, and it’s this adage that has become a common marketing ploy in the food industry. According to former McDonald’s advertising executive Dan Parker, this is but one of many tricks being used to fool people into eating supersized food portions. Another one is to reduce the size of certain foods without changing the price, leading people to view the family-sized versions being better in terms of value.

Speaking to the DailyMail.co.uk, Parker cited two examples that demonstrated these maneuvers. The first was the Mars Galaxy chocolate advert that featured a computer-generated version of British actress Audrey Hepburn. In the commercial, Hepburn chooses to sit at the back seat of a car instead of next to a male admirer so she could consume a large chocolate bar by herself. “This creates the illusion that a 100g or so chocolate bar is a single portion for someone as glamorous, slender and admired as ‘Audrey’,” said Parker.

The second was a Walkers commercial starring Gary Lineker, former English footballer turned sports broadcaster. Lineker is visited at a hospital by his children. He speaks glowingly of various chips found in his large bag of Walkers MixUps, leading his children to incapacitate him further to steal his chips. Parker explained that both of the commercials “promote hefty portion sizes.”

He added that these maneuvers are how food manufacturers are sustaining the obesity epidemic. In fact, in the same article, it’s revealed that single chocolate bar sales in the U.K went down by five percent (approximately 130 million Pound sterling). Consequently, the sales of both 100g chocolate bars and share bags went up by 7.6 percent (420 million Pound sterling) and 2.7 percent (300 million Pound sterling), respectively.

Parker went on further to compare the food industry to Big Tobacco, the largest tobacco industry companies that have since become known for their deceptive advertising. “I think what the food industry does now will define where it lands. If it behaves like tobacco it will end up being treated like tobacco. And I think it is behaving like tobacco,” Parker remarked. (Related: Food industry giants had big hand in writing US dietary guidelines; nutrition experts bewildered by useless advice.)

As such, Parker believes that combating the obesity crisis lies in the regulation of junk food advertising and proper food portioning. In addition to cutting down total food consumption by 10 to 20 percent, people should also reduce their ingestion of unhealthy food by 20 to 30 percent. Never mind the food industry-funded research crowing about how the lack of exercise is responsible for the rising cases of obesity.

“It’s all about deflecting it away from being about what we eat. The very inconvenient truth that nobody wants to talk about is that to resolve the obesity crisis, we need to eat less food. And we need to particularly eat less unhealthy food which generally comes in a packet and has a logo on it and is generally owned by a very large multinational corporation,” he said.

Parker, who was diagnosed with type-2 diabetes several years ago, claims to have reversed his condition by adhering to a strict diet and healthy lifestyle. With a renewed sense of vigor, Parker went on to found the charity Living Loud, wherein he assists anti-obesity campaigners in getting their messages across through his advertising skills. To that end, he’s partnered up with the likes of the Jamie Oliver Food Foundation, a global campaign dedicated to helping people understand, access, and consume better, healthier food.

Only time will tell if Parker’s efforts will help abate the effects of the obesity epidemic.

Find more stories about the science of food composition and food marketing at FoodScience.news.

Sources include:

DailyMail.co.uk

TheGuardian.com

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Source Article from http://www.naturalnews.com/2018-01-08-big-food-ad-exec-unveils-marketing-tricks-used-by-food-manufacturers.html

Still craving carbs? Try these 8 tricks to kick the habit

Image: Still craving carbs? Try these 8 tricks to kick the habit

(Natural News)
A lot of comfort food contains carbohydrates such as bread, pasta, and grains. And when you’re craving some garlic bread, spaghetti carbonara, or rice pudding, it’s easy to forget that processed carbohydrates can make it harder to lose weight. Since some of these foods are processed carbohydrates and eating a lot makes your body work harder to break down the excess sugar, dieting can become a useless endeavor.

But don’t lose hope. You can stop your cravings for carbs by following 8 proven tips for dealing with these urges. Nikki Ostrower, a nutritional expert and the founder of NAO Wellness in New York and Dana James, a functional medicine nutritionist, came up with these tips to keep your carb cravings in check.

Curb those carbs

  1. Eat complex carbohydrates – According to Ostrower, carbohydrates can be divided into four main groups: beans, fruits, starchy vegetables, and white bread. The first three groups are complex carbohydrates that come “from the ground.” Since beans, fruits, and veggies didn’t go through processing, these carbs are actually good for you. If you’re stocking up your pantry, opt for quinoa pasta or spaghetti squash instead of “white carbs.” Because vegetables like asparagus and carrots are also carbohydrates, they’re a better source of nutrition and they won’t make you gain weight.
  2. Avoid white carbs – “White carbs” include bread, pasta, and cereal, and these are all made of white flour. Eating these carbs can wreck your carefully planned diet because your body will have a harder time digesting any food containing processed sugars.
  3. Choose healthy fats and proteins – Ostrower adds that you can replace carbs with healthy fats such as avocados and nuts. Healthy fats also help with your body’s ghrelin levels, which the stomach produces and is secreted when you’re feeling hungry.
  4. Opt for cheat meals instead of cheat days – Indulging in carbohydrates for a whole day could lead to inflammations, which might cause stronger cravings for carbs, negating the effects of your diet. By having cheat meals, you can treat yourself without going overboard with the carbs. (Related: Nutritionist reveals tricks for slimming down quickly; limit eating hours, don’t snack, eat light at night, among others.)
  5. Always eat breakfast – Contrary to popular belief, skipping breakfast won’t make you lose weight faster. When you eat breakfast, your body gets the food it needs after a good night’s sleep consumes your food stores. James shared that if you’re craving for sugar in the afternoon, it’s a sign that you skipped breakfast.
  6. Drink a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar – A small dose of apple cider vinegar, taken with some water, can help your body digest sugar. Ostrowers says this will also help with your carb cravings. However, check if your apple cider vinegar has processed ingredients that might increase your sugar cravings.
  7. Keep some chromium supplements to keep cravings in check – James also advises people trying to lose weight to take some chromium supplements. These can help a lot when you’re feeling the urge to eat food with a high sugar content. When you feel a craving coming on, chromium picolinate will provide your body with vitamin B and help you avoid any sugary treats. Consume only a maximum of 1,000 mcg of chromium daily.
  8. Make your plate “colorful” When planning meals, make sure that your plate contains 50 percent vegetables, 25 percent protein, and 10 to 15 percent fats. Fill up the remaining with carbs. Don’t fill your plate with carbohydrates, advised Ostrower. The “color” on your plate will come from the veggies that are full of nutrients that you need. James added that people who are dieting should limit their intake of starchy carbohydrates, such as legumes, quinoa, and spaghetti squash.

Substitutes for carbohydrates

It’s not always easy to fight against your carb cravings. If you feel like binge-eating food laden with carbohydrates, try eating more of these foods instead:

  • Berries – Indulge in  different types of berries like blackberries, raspberries, strawberries. These superfoods not only curb your appetite, they have a bunch of other therapeutic benefits as well. 
  • Cauliflower – Substitute mashed potatoes with steamed or boiled cauliflower.
  • Pancakes — Use whey protein powder in your batter for healthier pancakes.

Visit Detox.news for effective weight loss tips.

Sources include:

DailyMail.co.uk

Phlaunt.com

 

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Source Article from http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-10-25-still-craving-carbs-try-these-8-tricks-to-kick-the-habit.html

3 Ways Your Brain Tricks You Into Sticking With Bad Habits

By Fattima Mahdi Truth Theory

Bad habits are hard to shake. Once the behaviour is learnt and consistently performed, bad habits become automatic in nature and are repeated again and again and again. No matter how badly we want to develop good habits, our brain can gear us to sticking with the bad.

Your brain takes 10 weeks to form good habits

According to a study on habit formation by Lally et al (2009), it takes 10 weeks to form habits.  So, if you want to stop smoking, learn a new language or go to the gym, you’ll need to put in the effort for over 2 months. Only then will it become part of your routine. If you’re not able to last the duration, the habit will be broken and you’ll be back to square one.

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Your brain likes to perform automatic tasks; this is less strenuous and is more efficient. Therefore, if you want to form good habits, you’ll need to be determined, resilient and be ready to make consistent effort.

Your brain doesn’t know your future self

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Your brain lives in the present. It sees your future self as another person and leaves it up to your future self to deal with the consequences of your actions. For example, you might stay up all night binge watching a series, even though you know that you have to give a presentation at work in the morning. On a conscious level, you understand that staying up late will leave you tired and could affect your presentation. However, on a subconscious level, your brain just wants to enjoy the series and doesn’t care about the presentation – that’s the other guy’s problem.

Your brain acknowledges success, which can trigger failure

As we now know, it takes around 10 weeks to form a good habit. Staying strong and making it through to the end can be really tough. If you are trying to quit smoking and manage to go one week without a cigarette, you might find yourself starting to slip up. This is because your brain recognises success and then wants to self-indulge as a reward. Once you slip up, your brain rationalises that you might as well keep on going down that path.

IMAGE CREDIT:lightwise / 123RF Stock Photo

THIS ARTICLE IS OFFERED UNDER CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE. IT’S OKAY TO REPUBLISH IT ANYWHERE AS LONG AS ATTRIBUTION BIO IS INCLUDED AND ALL LINKS REMAIN INTACT.Creative Commons LicenseCreative Commons License

I am Luke Miller, content manager at Truth Theory and creator of Potential For Change. I like to blend psychology and spirituality to help you create more happiness in your life.Grab a copy of my free 33 Page Illustrated eBook- Psychology Meets Spirituality- Secrets To A Supercharged Life You Control Here

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Source Article from https://truththeory.com/2017/08/26/3-ways-brain-tricks-sticking-bad-habits/

Blogging Made Easier: Five Tricks You Should Know

Writing interesting blog posts, creating attractive pages, and interacting with your visitors — these are essential ways to help you build a body of work, a successful business, or a growing audience online.

I’m part of a team focused on design and research at WordPress.com — I like to find ways to improve your experience, and to help you reach your website or blogging goals. In this post, I’ve compiled five of our favorite WordPress.com features that streamline your publishing experience and help you make an impact with your work faster.

Post Settings That You Can Hide

We’ve recently moved things around a bit in the editor. The settings for your post or page are now on the right — and can be hidden! Just click the cogwheel icon above your toolbar.

hide-show-sidebar.gif

If you yearn for a more minimal experience, hide the post settings so you can focus on your writing.

Add Images in a Snap

Visuals make posts and pages more compelling. But going through the steps to add image files often takes time and interrupts your flow.

Did you know you can add images simply by dragging and dropping? Just drag an image file from your computer into the browser window and drop it in your post.

drag-drop-images.gif

In the screen capture above you might have noticed a smaller, rectangular area on the right where you can drop your featured image. Many themes use featured images as header images or when displaying posts in lists. It’s an important image, if not the most important image, that you can set for your post.

A Visual Page Hierarchy

On WordPress.com, you can nest pages — a page can have a few “child” pages, and these child pages can have their own child pages, and so on. Many themes then use this information to display different levels of navigation. Super useful!

But until recently, it’s been a bit cumbersome to understand this hierarchy when working on your pages, and impossible to see at a glance. But not anymore!

visual-hierarchy.png

At My Site Pages, we now show the page hierarchy on the pages list (if you have fewer than 100 pages). This makes it much easier to scan your site’s structure and directly find what you’re looking for.

Change Your Slugs

When you give your post or page a title, WordPress.com automatically creates a slug for it. That’s useful, but if you’d like to change it, you can do so yourself by clicking on the chain link icon to the left of your post or page title:

change-slug.gif

You can shorten the slug or even rename it entirely. For example, let’s say you had a page called “Our Restaurant’s Menu” — WordPress will create it at “/our-restaurants-menu.” But now you know: You can make it accessible at the shorter and simpler “/menu.” Ideally, you do this before you hit publish, so that your readers will have the correct URL going forward.

Reply to Comments From the Posts List

For many of you, being able to interact with your site’s visitors is one of the most important aspects of having a website. Did you know you can respond to your comments all in one place?

Take a look at your post list at My Site Blog Posts. If a post has comments, you’ll see a small chat bubble among the icons on the bottom right. Did you know you can reply to comments right from here?

inline-comments.gif

Try it out the next time someone comments on one of your posts. And if you get a lot of comments, this is an easy way to streamline conversations and keep in touch with your readers or customers.

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We work to make WordPress.com a bit better every day, and we hope that these tricks help make blogging, writing, and designing your site easier and faster for you.

Do you have a pet peeve — a small thing that you think could be made even faster, simpler, or just better? Let us know in the comments.


Source Article from https://en.blog.wordpress.com/2017/06/29/five-tricks/