Addiction breeds addiction: Science shows high sugar diets make you more susceptible to other drugs, such as addictive opioids

Image: Addiction breeds addiction: Science shows high sugar diets make you more susceptible to other drugs, such as addictive opioids

(Natural News)
A study conducted by behavioral neuroscience experts at the University of Guelph in Canada has shown that excessive sugar intake may render people more susceptible to drug abuse. The scientists carried out experiments on laboratory rats in order to determine the connection between high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) intake and the likelihood of suffering opioid addiction.

As part of the study, the research team set up bottles containing a water solution with HFCS in various cages. The animal models had unrestricted, round-the-clock access to the sweetened solution. The bottles were removed after about a month of voluntary drinking. The researchers observed that exposure to the HFCS solution had an impact on the animals’ neural and behavioral responses to oxycodone, a variety of opioid and an active ingredient that induces pharmacological effects such as analgesia, euphoria, and feelings of relaxation. According to the experts, these changes may relatively affect both drug-taking and drug-seeking behaviors.

The scientists observed that the high sugar diet inhibited the oxycodone-induced release of dopamine and therefore stymied the feelings of reward associated with the substance. This may then prompt the body into consuming higher doses of oxycodone. According to the research team, the results demonstrate that nutrition may play a central role in opioid response. Likewise, the findings suggest that preventing unhealthy diets may not only stem obesity but may also help combat environmental factors that spur opioid dependence, the experts stated.

Data from the US National Survey on Drug Use and Health has revealed that about 27.9 million people aged 12 or older used oxycodone products. Statistics have also shown that 4.3 million people in the said age group have misused oxycodone-containing products in the previous year.

Study suggests that high sugar intake is a form of addiction

A previous study carried out by researchers at the Queensland University of Technology has cautioned that excessive sugar consumption itself should be considered an addiction. The researchers have also warned that excessive, long-term sugar intake may trigger the onset of eating disorders and may cause adverse effects on the behavior. As part of the study, the scientists examined the effects of high sugar intake on animal models and found that a sugary diet resulted in a significant increase in levels of dopamine, a hormone responsible for regulating the brain’s reward and pleasure centers. (Related: Sugar junkie? Study suggests excessive sugar intake is similar to drug addiction.)

The research team has noted that the repeated increases in dopamine levels show a similar mechanism in which the body processes drugs and substances of abuse such as cocaine, morphine, and tobacco. However, the scientists have observed that the body experiences an opposite effect in the long run as dopamine levels start to dwindle. This means that the body may require higher doses of sugar to compensate for the loss of the rewarding feeling, the scientists explained. According to the experts, artificial sweeteners have also yielded a similar addictive effect on animals.

“We have also found that as well as an increased risk of weight gain, animals that maintain high sugar consumption and binge eating into adulthood may also face neurological and psychiatric consequences affecting mood and motivation. Like other drugs of abuse, withdrawal from chronic sucrose exposure can result in an imbalance in dopamine levels and be as difficult as going ‘cold turkey’ from them,” researcher Dr. Selena Bartlett stated in a Science Daily article.

“Our study found that Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs like varenicline, a prescription medication trading as Champix which treats nicotine addiction, can work the same way when it comes to sugar cravings,” Professor Bartlett added.

Sources include:

DailyMail.co.uk

ScienceDaily.com

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Source Article from http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-10-18-addiction-breeds-addiction-science-shows-high-sugar-diets-make-you-more-susceptible-to-other-drugs-such-as-addictive-opioids.html

Sugar over sex? Almost half of those polled would rather give up sex for a year than sacrifice their daily sugar hit

Image: Sugar over sex? Almost half of those polled would rather give up sex for a year than sacrifice their daily sugar hit

(Natural News)
A survey carried out by SimplyHealth revealed that the U.K.’s excessive sugar consumption continues to affect a large number of people, many of whom even willing to forgo sex than cutting back on their daily sugar intake.

The survey examined more than 2,000 respondents and found that 41 percent were willing to sacrifice sexual intimacy rather than reducing their sugar intake. The survey also found that one in 10 people said they could not go a single day without sugar.

The poll also showed that 11 percent of respondents consider sugar as the most difficult thing to give up. Likewise, one in 10 respondents claimed that quitting sugar is just another health fad popularized over social media.

According to the survey, a quarter of respondents showed no interest in quitting sugar. However, the researchers found that 39 percent of the participants worried about sugar’s detrimental effects on body weight.

The experts also found that 33 percent of respondents were worried that they might end up with diabetes, while nine percent expressed concerns about developing oral health problems.

Survey data showed that 36 percent of people were worried about about tooth loss, while 22 percent were wary of developing gum disease and another 19 percent expressed concerns about bad breath.

“Every time we have something sugary to eat or drink, bacteria in our mouths feed on this sugar and produce harmful acids, which can cause tooth decay. It then takes our saliva around an hour to neutralise these acids and return our mouths to normal. This means the more times a day you expose your teeth to sugar, the more you increase your chances of tooth decay. This research suggests that many people find going ‘cold turkey’ on sugar particularly difficult because the sudden change in lifestyle can cause mood swings, problems concentrating or low energy levels,” Dr. Henry Clover, Head of Dental Policy at SimplyHealth, told the Daily Mail online.

“By gradually decreasing our sugar intake we are dramatically reducing the risk of oral health problems. In addition to healthier teeth, people who cut-down on sugar may also experience weight loss, improved skin, and increased energy levels. Going totally sugar-free isn’t always easy but there are websites such as sugarswapseptember.co.uk that are packed with hint and tips on how to make sugar swaps, sugar-free recipes and charts to help you track your progress as you curb your sugar consumption,” Dr. Clover added.

The findings of the recent survey coincide with the launch of the Sugar Swap September initiative.

Survey: Brits are also more willing to choose sugar over Facebook

The survey also revealed that 16 percent of respondents consider themselves addicted to sugar. In fact, only nine percent of respondents said sugar is the easiest thing to forgo, compared with 18 percent for Facebook and another 18 percent for alcohol. (Related: Sugar junkie? Study suggests excessive sugar intake is similar to drug addiction.)

In addition, the poll showed that 56 percent of people tried to go cold turkey on sugar consumption. Fourteen percent of respondents also reported seeking professional help to curb their sugar intake.

However, the researchers found that only 37 percent of respondents were able to give up sugar for longer than 12 months, compared with 55 percent of people sacrificing Facebook time for 12 months.

Survey data noted that 37 percent of respondents reported feeling irritable after quitting sugar, while 27 percent said quitting made them feel depressed. Only 62 percent of patients were able to quit sugar consumption for good.

Moreover, 39 percent of respondents said better knowledge of sugar substitutes would help them reduce their daily sugar intake. Likewise, 32 percent of participants stated that more access to recipes for low-sugar meals may help stem their excessive intake.

Sources include: 

DailyMail.co.uk

JuiceBrighton.com

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Source Article from http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-09-22-sugar-over-sex-almost-half-of-those-polled-would-rather-give-up-sex-for-a-year-than-sacrifice-their-daily-sugar-hit.html

What You Need To Know About The Connection Between Sugar & Your Mental Health







Next Story

For most of us, sugar is an essential part of our days. Think about how often you start craving ice cream, chocolate, or candy whenever you find  yourself down or stressed. For myself, despite my understanding that sugar is toxic and therefore doing my best to avoid it, I still crave a sugary treat when I am in these lowered states. We use sugar to soothe, to energize, and to reward ourselves for a job well done, often without even realizing it.

Can you relate?

Disclaimer: The reference to sugar in this article is about added sugars, not sugars that are naturally found in fruits and vegetables. 

So, Why Is This?

A study recently published in Scientific Reports found that there was a greater risk of depression among men whose diets were high in sugar.

You may be thinking that this makes sense because feeling depressed may lead to more sugar consumption rather than the other way around, but it seems as though, like many other drug addictions, this is a vicious cycle that we can easily fall into if we are not careful.

Researchers determined that, in many cases, sugar consumption actually occurred before depression, rather than being a consequence of it. An increasing number of studies have been emerging which explore the implications of diet on mental health, especially with the knowledge that up to 90% of our serotonin is produced in our gut — aptly giving the gut the name of our second brain. It has been difficult, however, to determine exactly how they are linked.

How Are Diet and Mental Health Linked?

A study conducted in 2002 monitoring the overall sugar consumption per person in six different countries — including Canada, France, Germany, Korea, New Zealand, and the United States — was able to connect the instance of sugar consumption to higher rates of major depression.

Since then, other research teams have also investigated the effect of diet on mental health. Two studies determined that eating fast foods like hamburgers, pizza, french fries, and other fried foods correlated with higher rates of depression in both children and adults.

Another study showed that female seniors from the United States with high levels of sugar in their diet also had greater rates of depression than those who consumed less sugar.

Another study determined that adults who drank unsweetened tea, compared to those who drank soft drinks, had lower rates of depression.

Does Sugar Affect Our Neurons?

Neurons are highly sensitive cells, and aren’t really designed to handle blood sugar spikes. Because of this, those suffering from diabetes are at a greater risk for neuronal damage, and scientists are now starting to understand how this can be linked directly to high blood sugar.

Researchers from the Department of Neurobiology at Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, China, performed a study on diabetic rats and discovered that high blood glucose led to neural inflammation and damage.

This same group also discovered that even neurons grown in the laboratory showed increased inflammation when exposed to high levels of glucose.

Does Sugar Affect Our Cognitive Ability?

A review of several studies written by Margaret Morris, Ph.D., a professor of pharmacology in the School of Medical Sciences of the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, and her team of researchers, determined that high rates of sugar consumption directly correlated with mild cognitive impairment in both seniors and children.

This group was also able to show that, after being put on a high sugar diet for just five days, laboratory rats had difficulty recognizing familiar places, a problem that went hand in hand with the inflammation and oxidative stress their brains had suffered.

Test This Theory for Yourself

Are you wondering if the sugar in your diet has been impacting your mood? Well, there is one way that you can easily find out: Limit your consumption, or even cut out all added sugars in your diet entirely. If you are a heavy consumer of sugar, then you will likely experience some detox symptoms, so it may take several weeks to see if your mood or general well-being improves after limiting or cutting out sugar altogether.

Limiting the amount of sugar you consume will benefit your physical health as well. To read more about how quitting sugar can have a positive impact on your health, check out the related CE articles below.

Much Love

Related CE Articles

What Happens To Your Body When You Go 10 Days Without Sugar

What Happens To Your Body When You Give Up Alcohol & Added Sugar For 30 Days

How To Completely Detox From Sugar in 10 Days


Having Trouble Losing Excess Weight?

Having trouble losing excess weight? This could be one of the biggest reasons why.

We know so much about food now yet much of the population is overweight and unhealthy because of the quality of our food and our perception about food.

Luckily there’s a quiz that you can take to find out where you stand on food addiction. You can take it here.

After you will get results and specific information based on your score. Try the quiz!

×

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Collective-evolution/~3/JHNPUlrblUY/

Coca Cola Is Promising $1 Million For A Healthy Replacement To Sugar






Coca Cola launched the competition using the crowd-sourcing platform HeroX, and according to their website they are seeking “a naturally sourced, safe, low- or no-calorie compound that creates the taste sensation of sugar when used in beverages.”

By: Luke Miller/Truth Theory  This sets a precedent for the power the consumers have to influence the behaviour of the world’s largest corporations.

Before we get into the content of this article, I just wanted to make it clear that we do not support the work of Coca Cola in any way. The health implications of the products they have created are horrendous and have shown a huge disregard for the health of their customers. In recent years there has been a huge decline in soda consumption with sales hitting a 30 year low in 2017 and Coca Cola’s profit dropping by 55%. What this shows is that consumers have the power to affect the way corporations behave with our buying decisions.

People are now becoming smart to the fact that sugar and artificial sweeteners are terrible for our health when frequently consumed and as a result, Coca cola have launched a competition offering $1 million dollars to whoever can create a sugar replacement.

Coca Cola launched the competition using the crowd-sourcing platform HeroX, and according to their website they are seeking “a naturally sourced, safe, low- or no-calorie compound that creates the taste sensation of sugar when used in beverages.” They have revealed that “one grand prize winner will be awarded $1 million in October 2018.”

Coca-Cola have already created drinks sweetened with stevia, but this has not produced the results they were hoping for. Robert Long, senior vice president and chief innovation officer at Coca-Cola, has said, that the company is pleased with the low- and no-calorie sweeteners it uses. But the company must continue to innovate “and keep looking for new beverage ingredients to meet consumers’ evolving tastes and lifestyles.”

These ideas set a precedent for consumers, showing that they have the power to change the behaviour of the largest and wealthiest corporations on the planet through our demand. This can work for the conflict minerals in our smart devices, the rainforest being cut down for resources that could be ethically and responsibly sources. The oil we continue to use, despite the renewable alternatives and the child labour that goes into many different products from our food to our clothes.

Corporations are suppliers and should we demand better alternatives, they will have no choice but to provide them! Please share this article if you agree.

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Coca Cola Have Offered $1 Million For A Healthy Replacement To Sugar

BLuke Miller Truth Theory

Ths sets a precedent for the power the consumers have to influence the behaviour of the world’s largest corporations.

Before we get into the content of this article, I just wanted to make it clear that we do not support the work of Coca Cola in any way. The health implications of the products they have created are horrendous and have shown a huge disregard for the health of their customers. In recent years there have been a huge decline in soda consumption with sales hitting a 30 year low in 2017 and Coca Cola’s profit dropping by 55%. What this shows is that consumers have the power to affect the way corporations behave with our buying decisions.

People are now becoming smart to the fact that sugar and artificial sweeteners are terrible for our health when frequently consumed and as a result Coca cola have launched a competition offering $1 million dollars to whoever can create a sugar replacement.

Coca Cola launched the competition using the crowd-sourcing platform HeroX, and according their website they are seeking “a naturally sourced, safe, low- or no-calorie compound that creates the taste sensation of sugar when used in beverages.” They have revealed that “one grand prize winner will be awarded $1 million in October 2018.”

Coca-Cola have already created drinks sweetened with stevia, but this has not produced the results they were hoping for. Robert Long, senior vice president and chief innovation officer at Coca-Cola, has said, that the company is pleased with the low- and no-calorie sweeteners it uses. But the company must continue to innovate “and keep looking for new beverage ingredients to meet consumers’ evolving tastes and lifestyles.”

This ideas sets a precedent for consumers, showing that they have the power to change the behaviour of the largest and wealthiest corporations on the planet through our demand. This can work for the conflict minerals in our smart devices, the rainforest being cut down for resources that could be ethically and responsibly sources. The oil we continue to use, despite the renewable alternatives and the child labour that goes into many different products from our food to our clothes.

Corporations are suppliers and should we demand better alternatives, they will have no choice but to provide them! Please share this article if you agree.

READ WHAT HAPPENS TO THE BODY 1 HOUR AFTER DRINKING A CAN OF DIET COKE

IMAGE CREDIT:bagwold / 123RF Stock Photo

THIS ARTICLE IS OFFERED UNDER CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE. IT’S OKAY TO REPUBLISH IT ANYWHERE AS LONG AS ATTRIBUTION BIO IS INCLUDED AND ALL LINKS REMAIN INTACT. Creative Commons LicenseCreative Commons License

I am Luke Miller the author of this article, and creator of Potential For Change. I like to blend psychology and spirituality to help you create more happiness in your life.Grab a copy of my free 33 Page Illustrated eBook- Psychology Meets Spirituality- Secrets To A Supercharged Life You Control Here

Source Article from https://truththeory.com/2017/09/04/coca-cola-offered-1-million-healthy-replacement-sugar/

Cutting sugar consumption for just two weeks found to dramatically improve the health of children

Image: Cutting sugar consumption for just two weeks found to dramatically improve the health of childrenImage: Cutting sugar consumption for just two weeks found to dramatically improve the health of children

(Natural News)
Nutritionists have observed that simply cutting sugar intake drastically improved the metabolic function among children in only two weeks. These results were published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association (JAOA) and ends with a call for parents to take a stronger stance on their children’s diet. Authors of the nutritional review revealed that this straightforward reduction in processed sugar, particularly fructose, minimized fat synthesis in the liver. This in turn lessened the child’s risk of developing debilitating diseases such as fatty liver disease and type-2 diabetes.

These conclusions were made after conducting carefully-controlled experiments which involved determining the relationship between fructose and metabolic function. Researchers chose high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) as their control variable, as this is normally the additive sugar found in many processed foods. They found that this specific sugar accelerated the conversion of energy to fat. To compare, glucose (which is the sugar found in cereals, vegetables, and fruits) is 20 percent metabolized in the liver and 80 percent in the entire body. Fructose, on the other hand (found in sugary drinks and in “healthy” salad dressings), is 90 percent metabolized in the liver. The simple sugar was even noted to convert to fat 18.9 times faster than glucose.

HFCS is used in around 75 percent of all packaged foods and drinks because of it’s affordability and taste. Fructose is 20 times sweeter than raw sugar.

But sweetness is as sweetness does. The sugar disrupts basic body function and stimulates cells, or more specifically, the metabolic pathways, to liberate the energy from the sugar and immediately store it as fat. More dangerously, due to the rapid conversion, the body does not even register that it has eaten. People can often eat huge amounts of fructose and still be hungry.

Dr. Tyree Winters, an osteopathic pediatrician wrote in the study, “many young patients tell me they’re always hungry, which makes sense because what they’re eating isn’t helping their bodies function.”

“If we cut out the HFCS and make way for food that the body can properly metabolize, the hunger and sugar cravings fade. At the same time, patients are getting healthier without dieting or counting calories. This one change has the potential to prevent serious diseases and help restore health,” said Dr. Winters

While the change can be daunting for a lot of children (particularly due to sugar also building an addictive mentality in the brain), researchers say that it only takes fourteen days to see an impact.

Junk food babies?

Blame it on convenience or what have you, but more parents are turning to pre-packaged, processed food to feed their children. This can become very dangerous, as is the probability that we are raising the first generation in history that may not outlive its parents. Children no longer toddle, they waddle.

It has become even more crucial that parents make the extra effort to raise their children in a healthy eating environment. Thankfully, the transition can be made easier with these tips:

  • Mama say, mama do – The best way to teach your children how to eat better is to lead by example. Children tend to parrot their parents and are more likely to reach for that carrot stick if their mommy or daddy love eating them too. Simply saying “Because I said so!” is not a very effective tactic.
  • Start slow – For parents who have already introduced their child to junk food and want to be healthier, they can start small. Try incorporating more green things into meals. Listen to what your child says and notice which fruits or vegetables they like. Variety is key here as well. Children tend to eat more colorful food so this is a great way to use many different food items.
  • Stock up on the good stuff – When children want a snack, offer them a vegetable or a fruit. Fill your kitchen with healthy food so children have no choice but to eat it. Eventually they will get used to these snacks and may even start enjoying it.

Parents should not feel disheartened if their children don’t initially take to the healthier change, but they must remain vigilant about creating a healthy and more vibrant future for their kids.

Sources include:

Breibart.com

MedicalXpress.com

JAOA.org

ChildDevelopmentInfo.com

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Americans’ Sugar Intake Same as 7 Years Ago – But Why?

Oh, America. You were doing such a good job of cutting your sugar intake, but you’re back to drinking too many sugary beverages. Statistics released by the CDC in January show that after a decade of falling consumption, Americans of all ages are consuming the same amount of sugary drinks as they were in 2009-2010, which is when the last time the CDC published comparable data. [1]

Rachel Johnson, a professor of nutrition at the University of Vermont and a spokeswoman for the American Heart Association, said:

“The amount of sugar that children in particular consume is still astounding. We recommend that children drink soda once a week or less. We’re seeing that two-thirds drink it on a daily basis.”

Read: 5 Great Natural Substitutes for Soda

You would think that with all the warnings about sugar consumption and the glut of health problems it causes, more people would swap soda, coffee drinks, and energy drinks for a cool glass of water. But that’s not the case, and CDC officials can’t fully explain why, though they have a couple of theories.

One possibility is that sales of teas, flavored waters, energy drinks, and other amped-up beverages are rising, even as soda sales are dropping. The market research firm Euromonitor has data that seems to back that theory.

Its numbers show that the U.S. market for conventional carbonated sodas contracted .6% between 2011 and 2016. During that same period, sales of energy drinks, sports drinks, and iced teas and bottled coffees grew by between 5% and 13%.

Another theory is that the initial decline in sugary-drink consumption occurred among upper-income individuals and others who were particularly receptive to changing their diet habits.

Walter Willett, a professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said:

“My guess is that we might be seeing different trends by age and socioeconomic status. People with higher levels of education and income have made dramatic changes to their diets overall in recent years. Many people with lower levels of education and income have seen no improvement.”

Other Sugar Findings by the CDC

The CDC also found:

  • In 1999-2000, the average adult consumed 196 calories’ worth of sweetened drinks daily. That number fell to 151 by 2009-2010.
  • From 2011-2014, the average adult drank 145 calories’ worth of sugary beverages a day. That means that roughly 30% consumed 2 or more sugar-sweetened drinks on a daily basis, accounting for more than 10% of their total daily calories.
  • Children drank 223 calories of soda and other drinks in 1999 and 155 calories in 2009. That number has remained at 143 since then, representing 7.3% of a child’s calorie intake, on average. The most recent declines were not considered statistically significant.
  • Nearly 2/3 of American children consumed at least 1 sugary drink a day.
  • Among children ages 2-19, 64.5% of boys and 61.3% consumed at least 1 sugar-sweetened beverage a day.
  • Children 12-19 consumed more sugary drinks on average than younger children.

Current U.S. dietary guidelines recommend consuming less than 10% – just 6 teaspoons – of your daily calories from added sugars, and limiting or removing sugary drinks from your diet.

Read: Is a Soda Tax the Solution to Reducing Sugar-Consumption Worldwide?

Asher Rosinger, epidemic intelligence service officer at the CDC and lead author of the study, said:

“If you extrapolate our findings out, that means 111 million adults and 147 million kids still drink at least some sugar-sweetened beverage daily.

This study is important, because consuming sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with weight gain, Type 2 diabetes, dental caries (cavities) and dyslipidemia (high cholesterol) in children, all of which have serious negative downstream health consequences.” [1]

Kids consume more soda and sugary beverages and they go through adolescence. However, today’s seniors don’t drink much soda because they didn’t drink much soda growing up. Tomorrow’s senior citizens may be the exact opposite.

 

Dariush Mozaffarian, dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, said the notion is worrisome and added:

“We need to have a culture change around soda, the same way we had a culture change around drunk driving, smoking, bike helmets for kids, car seats, and seat belts.”

One of the cultural changes on experts’ wish lists is for the beverage industry to stop marketing to children, which many processed food makers have already done. They would also like to see more soda taxes. Consumption has dropped as much as 20% in the past 3 years in Berkeley, California, where the nation’s first soda tax was approved.

Sources:

[1] The Washington Post

CDC

Medical Daily


Storable FoodStorable Food


About Julie Fidler:

Author ImageAuthor Image

Julie Fidler is a freelance writer, legal blogger, and the author of Adventures in Holy Matrimony: For Better or the Absolute Worst. She lives in Pennsylvania with her husband and two ridiculously spoiled cats. She occasionally pontificates on her blog.

Source Article from http://naturalsociety.com/americans-sugar-consumption-rise-again-1938/

Study Reveals Link Between Sugar and Depression (and Mental Disorders)

A 30-year study published in Scientific Reports suggests that people who consume high amounts of sugar intake may be more likely to experience mental health problems, especially men. Further, the study reveals a link between sugar and depression, which should be intriguing to everyone given the amount of sugar Americans consume. [1]

Nitty Gritty Study Details

More than 10,000 British civil servants between the ages of 35 and 55 were recruited for the University College of London’s Whitehall II study, which launched in 1985. In the study, researchers monitored the participants’ health and behavior, conducting surveys with each volunteer over 10 phases, 3 years apart.

Of the participants, 66.9% were men and 33.1% were women.

The researchers surveyed the participants’ diets at the 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 9th phases of the study. The team looked at 15 kinds of foods placed in the “sweet food and beverage” category, including cakes, cookies, and sugar-sweetened coffees, and teas.

The food intake surveys were then compared with a general health questionnaire designed to measure symptoms of depression and other common mental disorders (CMDs), such anxiety and insomnia.

The researchers wrote:

“The present long-term prospective study is the first to investigate the association of sugar consumption from sweet food/beverages with prevalent, incident and recurrent mood disorders, while also examining the effect these disorders might have on subsequent sugar intake.”

They added:

“Further, we found an increased likelihood for incident CMD in men and some evidence of recurrent depression in both sexes with higher intakes of sugar from sweet food/beverages.”

To see if there might be other underlying reasons for the participants’ depression, researchers also accounted for other factors besides sugar intake, including marital status, age, ethnicity, and smoking.

The Not-so-Sweet Findings

The study found that men who consumed more than 67 grams of sugar a day were 23% more likely to suffer from depression, anxiety, or other CMDs 5 years later, compared with men who consumed less than 40 grams. [2]

Additionally, both men and women with a mood disorder and a high intake of sugar were found to have a higher risk of developing depression again 5 years later, compared with participants who consumed less sugar. This association, however, was partly explained by their overall diet.

What’s more, the researchers found no evidence that participants changed their sugar intake after suffering mood disorders. In other words, if a person ate more sugar during a particularly low point in their lives, they didn’t cut their sugar intake once they were feeling better.

So What Might be the Link Between Sugar and Depression?

Anika Knüppel, a PhD candidate in epidemiology and public health at University College London, and the study’s lead author, explained:

“We are still not sure what causes depression, but some researchers believe that biological changes are at the root of it. Some of these changes could be influenced by sugar and sweet taste.”

She uses the example of a study in rats which found that diets high in sugar and fat can reduce BDNF, a protein which influences the growth and development of nerve cells in the brain. This protein is believed to play a role in the development of depression and anxiety.

In addition, high-sugar diets can increase inflammation. While inflammation protects the body against microorganisms and foreign substances, it can also zap people of energy and their ability to concentrate. Ongoing research suggests that some mood disorders may be linked to inflammation.

Read: 12 Tips for Extinguishing Disease-Causing Inflammation

Knüppel said another possible culprit is the feel-good hormone dopamine. This theory also comes from a study of rats, which found that sweet foods are as addictive as cocaine.

 

In fact, several studies have shown that sugar is addictive. Processed foods – one of the sources, if not the source of added sugars – has been shown to be addictive. Some studies are very specific, such as this one from 2013, which showed that Oreo cookies are addictive.

Dopamine is a brain chemical involved in the reward system, and it is believed to affect mood. Many people become addicts due to mental disorders because they use substances to self-medicate themselves. However, addiction itself is linked to a greater likelihood of developing a mood disorder.

Lastly, Knüppel said the link between sugar and depression could also be explained due to an association with obesity – a condition related to mood – and other conditions.

She wrote:

“But these associations could also reflect a reverse phenomenon: Low mood could make people change their diet. Sweet foods could be used to soothe bad feelings by providing a short-term mood boost. And low mood and anxiety could make simple tasks, such as grocery shopping or cooking, so difficult and exhausting for the sufferer that they might start to avoid them. Instead, they might opt for junk food, takeout and ready meals – all of which have a high sugar content.”

The link between sugar and depression (actually, mental health overall) is far from clear-cut, but it goes to show, yet again, that there is no redeeming health value to sugar.

We should also point out that it’s possible more men than women were found to suffer mood disorders simply because there were more men than women in the study.

Sources:

[1] Newsweek

[2] UPI


Storable FoodStorable Food


About Julie Fidler:

Author ImageAuthor Image

Julie Fidler is a freelance writer, legal blogger, and the author of Adventures in Holy Matrimony: For Better or the Absolute Worst. She lives in Pennsylvania with her husband and two ridiculously spoiled cats. She occasionally pontificates on her blog.

Source Article from http://naturalsociety.com/study-link-sugar-and-depression-mental-disorders-1677/

Sugar & depression: Scientists just found another worrying link

    

Lately, the science has really been stacking up evidence against consuming sugars in excess.

In addition to being linked to conditions like obesity, diabetes, inflammatory diseases, eating high levels of sugar has been associated with mental illnesses like depression. In a study published July 27 in Scientific Reports that followed over 8,000 adults over 22 years, researchers from University College London found that men who reported consuming foods that contained 67 grams of sugar per day or more were 23% more likely to be diagnosed with clinical depression after five years from when the study began.

For their work, researchers followed the a cohort called the Whitehall Study II, which tracked health and stress data for civil servants aged 35 to 55 in London beginning in 1985. Every few years, participants filled out surveys about their diets and other markers of health-including whether or not they had been clinically diagnosed with mental health conditions like depression and anxiety. Participants didn’t have any mental illnesses diagnosed to start, and researchers used their food questionnaires to estimate how much sugar each person was eating per day.

After the first five-year follow up, men who ate the most sugar, which the authors categorize as 67 grams or more per day-almost twice the amount of sugar intake recommended by the American Heart Association, and roughly three and a half regular sized Snickers bars-had higher rates of mental health diagnoses than those who ate less sugar, regardless of whether or not they were overweight. Even during years when participants reported eating less sugar, levels of mental illness stayed the same, which suggests that previous sugar habits had led to depression or anxiety and not the other way around. In this study, the relationship between sugar and mental illness wasn’t well-defined among women.

Anika Knuppel, a doctoral candidate in epidemiology at the University College London and lead author of the current paper, cautions that these studies can’t prove added sugar causes mental illness. Studies that follow self-reported health data over time are inherently flawed because even when participants have honest intentions, they have poor memories about what they eat. The only thing that could would be a randomized controlled study, which would be unethical to perform knowing the links between sugar and other health consequences, Knuppel says.

But there are theories as to how excess sugar may affect mental health. James Gangwisch, a psychologist at Columbia University who found a link between sugar and depression in postmenopausal women, has postulated that foods high in sugar that are easy to break down may cause our blood sugar to immediately rise, and then plummet. This crash puts a stress on the body, and it responds by releasing hormones like cortisol and adrenaline, which, over time may lead to anxiety or depression. Furthermore, animal research in rats has shown that diets high in fat and sugar can lead the brain to produce less of a protein called BDNF, which has been associated with anxiety and depression in humans, Knuppel says.

All this is to say that there isn’t proof that sugar causes mental illness, but that there is a growing amount of evidence that suggest that eating a lot of extra sugar has consequences that go far beyond our waistlines. It’s worth considering how much added sugar is in your own diet beyond what’s found naturally in foods like fruits, which don’t give us the same blood sugar spike that foods like candy do. The US Food and Drug Administration has mandated that all food labels include added sugars by July 26, 2018.

Source Article from https://www.sott.net/article/358485-Sugar-depression-Scientists-just-found-another-worrying-link

Eating processed sugar found to cause depression… but magnesium reverses it

Image: Eating processed sugar found to cause depression… but magnesium reverses it

(Natural News)
Men are 23 percent more likely to develop depression or anxiety if their diet consists of a lot of high-sugar food such as soft drinks and desserts. Researchers at the University College London are stating conclusively that diet impacts mental health, and that high-sugar food can contribute to an increased risk of a mood disorder. The connection between the two has always been unclear; scientists wondered if diet influenced cognition or if the mental disorder disrupted eating habits.

This new study, published in Scientific Reports, concludes that mental illness — particularly mood disorders — could be directly caused by diet. Surprisingly, only men were noted to show this relationship. Women, the researchers observed, did not display any connection between mental health and high-sugar intake.

The health risks involved in a high-sugar diet have already been extensively studied. Excessive sugar consumption is linked to a variety of health conditions such as diabetes, dementia, and obesity. Nevertheless, the researchers wanted to empirically determine if sugar intake could lead to depression. In order to answer this supposition, Anika Knüppel of the UCL Institute of Epidemiology and Health studied data from 8,000 British adults who filled out a questionnaire on their eating habits and lifestyle since the 1980s. This included questions like, “How often do you eat a piece of cake?”

Participants were also asked to complete a mental health survey and were measured for their height and weight. After controlling for variables such as socioeconomic status, researchers found that men whose diets consisted of fizzy drinks, cakes, and sugary teas had a 23 percent increased risk of experiencing an episode of clinical depression or anxiety in the following five years. This pattern was not seen among the women participants — but this may not be indicative of anything significant. Knüppel noted that among the pooled participants, women consisted of a lesser percentage than that of men. This could be a reason why no relationship between sugar intake and mental illness risk among women was seen.

“I had a feeling we’d see the ‘Bridget Jones-like women eat chocolate’ idea. But it turns people underestimate that men’s sugar intake is super high,” she said. Nonetheless, Knüppel emphasized that women only made a third of the sample size of the study.

Critics of the study suggest that Knüppel calculated her results based on an inherently flawed system. Numbers were taken from a self-tested questionnaire; one that is potentially embarrassing to the survey takers. There could be a level of dishonesty that could skew the results. However, Knüppel countered that is would be “quite unlikely” that participants would exaggerate what they eat. In fact, her results could be distorted, but in the opposite direction. What she could be seeing may actually be a lesser effect than the true representation. Moreover, at least three previous pieces of research support her findings.

Knüppel believes that sugar could affect mood in several ways. One crucial mechanism is neural cell development. She has hypothesized that high levels of sugar reduce the production of a certain protein that regulates neuron growth. The development of mood disorders like depression and anxiety are thought to be involved in this process. Additionally, excessive sugar consumption dramatically increases the amount of inflammation found in the body; a condition, scientists say, that can prompt an episode of mild depression.

Tom Sanders, professor emeritus of nutrition and dietetics at Kings College London, remained cautious about these findings. He says that even controlling for lifestyle habits, other confounding factors can be seen in the analysis of this study.

“From a scientific standpoint, it is difficult to see how sugar in food would differ from other sources of carbohydrate on mental health, as both are broken down to simple sugars in the gut before absorption and the glycemic index of sugar is less than refined starchy foods such as white bread and rice,” he said.

A simple solution

Depression and anxiety are devastating conditions. For those afflicted with the disease, daily life can be extremely hard. For the most part, patients are prescribed harmful synthetic medicine alongside cognitive behavioral therapy. The prognosis for this combination treatment varies, with some people getting better while others steadily fading into a worse state. It can become an incredibly frustrating situation for the ill patient to live normally.

Thankfully, there is a simple solution in sight. Recent studies are validating the efficacy of magnesium in the prevention and treatment of milder forms of depression. In fact, a nutritional study published in PLoS ONE concluded that taking 248 milligrams of magnesium a day led to a reversal of several symptoms of depression. Magnesium was not only more effective, but it was also cheaper in the long run.

It is only recently that mainstream media is acknowledging these claims.

Sources include:

NewScientist.com

TheGuardian.com

 

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Source Article from http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-05-eating-processed-sugar-found-to-cause-depression-but-magnesium-reverses-it.html