UNLV President and Students Demand Apology From North Las Vegas Police


LAS VEGAS — There are new developments in the controversy over a video showing North Las Vegas Police riding motorcycles on the UNLV campus without permission and immediately after a Black Lives Matter spoken word event.
Students believe the officers were trying to intimidate them.

It happened on Tuesday night, and on Wednesday, the university’s president, Len Jessup, demanded an apology from police. On Thursday, the Black Lives Matter group came forward and also demanded an apology.

Vera Anderson was one of the poets speaking that night and she says that the police presence was out of place.
“Like what are you doing here? This is where students walk,” said Anderson.

Aaron Patty is the spokesperson for the North Las Vegas Police Department and says this is all just a big misunderstanding and officers had no idea that a Black Lives Matter event was taking place.
He says those motorcycle cops were just looking for a tight space to train in.

“This helps create an environment for them where they can do low-speed training in and around tight obstacles that’s challenging for them,” said Patty.

Anderson says she understands that officers need to train but she thinks they could have done so in a way that didn’t alarm the students on campus.

“I definitely think officers need to train, and they need to train on multi-cultural competence. They know black and brown people are afraid of them or think they might get hurt,” said Anderson. “So maybe when they saw all those black people, they could’ve stopped and said, ‘Hey we’re just doing some training.’ Instead, they said nothing.”

Officer Patty admits the department should have let UNLV know they would be there, but he stresses the fact that his officers in no way meant to offend anyone.

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Top 9 Apps for Students: Writing Papers, Exam Preparation, Time Management




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There are lots of apps out there for people who are writing or learning, whatever their intentions are. The apps range from apps which help with editing, apps which help people prepare for exams, and apps which can help me write. Some people might prefer to use a service like essaykitchen.net, which writes papers for money, but some other people might find that their problems (which they would otherwise have gone to a writing service with) are solved with the help of the apps which they can now use. Apps are increasingly being incorporated into the educational system because of their adaptability and popularity among the student body as a whole. This article does not contain all the apps which are available, but it has most of the more important ones, and is hopefully a good introduction to the topic.

Apps for Writing College Papers

Apps for writing college papers include apps which help with editing and sentence structure, to help people who are writing to better understand where they are going wrong, and how they can improve their work.

  • Grammarly – Grammarly is an app which is described as a language enhancing platform by its creators. Launched in 2009, Grammarly allows users to proofread their papers and works, as well as find plagiarism sources. The app has more than two hundred and fifty grammar rules uploaded onto it for the user’s benefit.
  • Hemingway – the Hemingway app shows people what their writing is like by highlighting different sections in different colours, so that they can see what they need to improve or change. Yellow and red both indicate a sentence which is too long – you can either split it, or simplify it in some way – while other options, such as pinks, give you the option to change individual words to simpler ones, and even offer suggestions. Hemingway is something which people can actively use to improve their writing, as it shows them how to improve, and gives suggestions.
  • ProWritingAid – this is an editing tool which has a multifunctional approach – it was specifically designed to help people rewrite and redraft their work. It helps with possible changes to be made to the work, and it offers ideas as to how things in the text can be made more readable and accessible for everyone involved. This involves highlighted texts which can be moused over, and which display possible changes to the writer, as a way of showing them how to make the necessary changes. ProWritingAid is an app which is seen as very useful for people who are reworking first drafts into something presentable.

Apps for Exam Preparation

These apps exist specifically to help people prepare for and work on their exams, whatever they need to study. The apps give them different ways to revise, and help them plan out their revision.

  • Exam Prep App – this app gives free help for people studying for exams by offering pass papers and study questions in both English and Hindi for people using it.
  • Grade Up – this app allows people to access all kinds of resources and tests for free, as well as being set up in such a way as to allow you to test yourself and others using the app. People can also talk to other people who are also using the app to study for similar exams.
  • Aptitude Test and Preparation – this app has seven unique options for whatever exam you are wanting to practice for, to give users the widest range of practice and tips as possible. The practice mode allows you to make changes based on how exactly you want to study and prepare for the exam in question.

Apps for Time Management

Apps for time management exist to help people divide up their time, to help them remember appointments, and, in the case of exam studying, helps them to divide up their time and revise appropriately.

  • Wunderlist – this app allows you to manage specific tasks, breaking down your schedule into different tasks throughout the day. The app is available for smartphone, tablet, and wearable technologies.
  • To-do – this is a cloud based technology which allows people to manage specific tasks and times through various pieces of technology, such as smartphones, tablets, or wearable technologies.
  • Studious – this app has an in-built calendar which allows people to track their appointments, including different colours to help distinguish different tasks. People who use the app can also set notifications for their appointments, and support links. The app is fully compatible with tablets.

Wrap-up

Most people are quite happy to go to a writing service and say ‘write my paper for me’ to them, but these apps can help to change the way we look at time management and writing, to see if we could actually work on the problems ourselves to become better writers. While the apps given in this article cover three major areas, they are only scratching the surface of what is available – there are so many apps available that anybody can find one to suit themselves.




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Law Professor tells millennial students he will not accept any words ending in "ism"

adam macleod

    

A professor of law at Faulkner University in Montgomery, Alabama, has had enough of millennial students who rely on trendy terms so they can deride the wisdom of the ages. Adam MacLeod, associate professor of law at Jones School of Law, wrote an article for The New Boston Post in which he published a speech that warned his first-year law students he would not accept any words ending in “ism.”

MacLeod’s preamble to his speech stated, “For several years now my students have been mostly Millennials. Contrary to stereotype, I have found that the vast majority of them want to learn. But true to stereotype, I increasingly find that most of them cannot think, don’t know very much, and are enslaved to their appetites and feelings. Their minds are held hostage in a prison fashioned by elite culture and their undergraduate professors. They cannot learn until their minds are freed from that prison.”

Then, the terrific speech. It commenced like this:

Before I can teach you how to reason, I must first teach you how to rid yourself of unreason. For many of you have not yet been educated. You have been dis-educated. To put it bluntly, you have been indoctrinated. Before you learn how to think you must first learn how to stop unthinking. Reasoning requires you to understand truth claims, even truth claims that you think are false or bad or just icky. Most of you have been taught to label things with various “isms” which prevent you from understanding claims you find uncomfortable or difficult. Reasoning requires correct judgment. Judgment involves making distinctions, discriminating. Most of you have been taught how to avoid critical, evaluative judgments by appealing to simplistic terms such as “diversity” and “equality.”

MacLeod continued:

Reasoning requires you to understand the difference between true and false. And reasoning requires coherence and logic. Most of you have been taught to embrace incoherence and illogic. You have learned to associate truth with your subjective feelings, which are neither true nor false but only yours, and which are constantly changeful.

Noting that the students had “weeds” in their minds, MacLeod asserted:

Each of you has different weeds, and so we will need to take this on the case-by-case basis. But there are a few weeds that infect nearly all of your brains. So I am going to pull them out now.

First, except when describing an ideology, you are not to use a word that ends in “ism.” Communism, socialism, Nazism, and capitalism are established concepts in history and the social sciences, and those terms can often be used fruitfully to gain knowledge and promote understanding. “Classism,” “sexism,” “materialism,” “cisgenderism,” and (yes) even racism are generally not used as meaningful or productive terms, at least as you have been taught to use them. Most of the time, they do not promote understanding.

MacLeod succinctly stated, “In fact, ‘isms’ prevent you from learning.”

MacLeod tore into the idea of what he called ” chronological snobbery,” the idea that “moral knowledge progresses inevitably, such that later generations are morally and intellectually superior to earlier generations, and that the older the source the more morally suspect that source is.”

MacLeod ripped into the importance placed by students on diversity and equality, pointing out, “Some diversity is bad. For example, if slavery is inherently wrong, as I suspect we all think it is, then a diversity of views about the morality of slavery is worse than complete agreement that slavery is wrong. Similarly, equality is not to be desired for its own sake. Nobody is equal in all respects. We are all different, which is to say that we are all not the same, which is to say that we are unequal in many ways.”

Then, the crux of the matter: “You should not bother to tell us how you feel about a topic. Tell us what you think about it. If you can’t think yet, that’s O.K.. Tell us what Aristotle thinks, or Hammurabi thinks, or H.L.A. Hart thinks. Borrow opinions from those whose opinions are worth considering.”

Macleod concluded:

1. The only “ism” I ever want to come out your mouth is a syllogism. If I catch you using an “ism” or its analogous “ist” – racist, classist, etc. – then you will not be permitted to continue speaking until you have first identified which “ism” you are guilty of at that very moment. You are not allowed to fault others for being biased or privileged until you have first identified and examined your own biases and privileges.

2. If I catch you this semester using the words “fair,” “diversity,” or “equality,” or a variation on those terms, and you do not stop immediately to explain what you mean, you will lose your privilege to express any further opinions in class until you first demonstrate that you understand three things about the view that you are criticizing.

3. If you ever begin a statement with the words “I feel,” before continuing you must cluck like a chicken or make some other suitable animal sound.

Source Article from https://www.sott.net/article/369329-Law-Professor-tells-millennial-students-he-will-not-accept-any-words-ending-in-ism

College students going hungry, relying on donated food and food stamps

    

A nitro cold brew sells for $5, and a large mocha for $4.50 at a popular coffee and muffin bar in UC Berkeley’s student union. Downstairs, business is just as brisk at another food emporium.

The provisions there are free.

“I’m low on funds,” shrugged Christopher, a junior, as he stuffed apple juice, a half gallon of milk, a box of peanut butter Puffin cereal and two cans of organic pinto beans and sweet corn – the UC Berkeley Food Pantry’s five-item limit – into his backpack.

Christopher, who asked that his last name not be used, said he depends on the pantry’s donated groceries to make ends meet, especially during emergencies. Someone slashed his tire last week, he said, and now he’s out $110 for a new one. Without the help, he’d have to make a choice: wheels or food.

Faced with such choices, students often skip the nutrition.

Christopher is one of thousands of UC Berkeley students who rely on the Food Pantry for help – records show 1,549 unique visits in September alone – and many are also signing up for food stamps, known as CalFresh, that can provide up to $192 a month for groceries.

More than 500 UC Berkeley students have applied for food stamps since January, up from 111 in all of 2016, and just 41 the year before, said Michael Altfest, spokesman for the Alameda County Community Food Bank, which helps students fill out the forms. Last year, food bank representatives showed up once a month to help the students. Now they have to come every week to meet the need.

Not all applicants qualify. This year, the acceptance rate is 73 percent, up from 62 percent in 2015, Altfest said.

Three years ago, state lawmakers passed AB1930 to make it easier for students to prove eligibility for food stamps. But it’s taken a few years for the ripple effect to hit.

A University of California survey of 9,000 students across all 10 campuses shed light on the need in 2015: Nearly 1 in 5 students, 19 percent, said they had too little to eat “due to limited resources.” Another 23 percent routinely ate substandard food with little variation.

Suddenly, the phrase “food insecurity” – from poor nutrition to outright hunger – became a campus buzz word, and not just on UC campuses.

Aware that some low-income students are stuck on campus during school vacations, Stanford University will keep a dining hall open during spring break for the first time next semester. California State University is working to get each of its 23 campuses equipped with the technology to accept food stamps, which have been provided electronically using debit cards since 2004.

Community college students are especially challenged by soaring housing prices – the two-year schools typically offer no student housing – so on Nov. 9, City College of San Francisco trustees voted unanimously to begin developing a program to help students who are chronically homeless and hungry.

At UC, President Janet Napolitano announced in 2016 that she would spend $302,000 over two years at each of the 10 campuses to expand food pantries and register more students for food stamps through CalFresh.

Last spring at UC Berkeley, Esteban Vasquez became one of those students.

“It’s a huge sigh of relief knowing I can walk into a grocery store and purchase the items I need,” he said the other day.

Vasquez is 21, majors in business and has a management consultant job lined up after he graduates in May. He’s needed his brain cells sharp and his energy well-fueled to make that happen. What he’s needed is food.

“Sophomore year was the most difficult,” he said. “I was out of the dorms and didn’t have a meal plan anymore. It was just rough.”

It’s also rough to talk about, he said. “You feel helpless. You enter this very dark space. In a sense, you become depressed.”

He considered dropping out. He began comparing himself to more affluent students whose families were well equipped to help them succeed. And he acquired an “impostor syndrome,” he said – a sense that he didn’t really belong at UC’s flagship campus.

Born in Oxnard (Ventura County), Vasquez is the youngest of four children. His parents had no schooling at all, he said, and instead spent decades picking fruit “in pretty much any field you can think of.”

At home, food meant eggs, beans and fideo – noodle soup – every day. If he wanted more, his mom warmed up a tortilla and gave it to him with a dab of sour cream and a sprinkle of salt.

“We were pretty much low-income,” Vasquez said. He credits his fifth-grade teacher, Mr. Paul, for referring him to a program for gifted students that inspired his love of reading and set in motion his journey to UC Berkeley and the scholarships and financial aid that would pay for most of it.

But like many students, Vasquez arrived better equipped to handle the university’s challenging academics than other, seemingly simpler hurdles: stress, time – and food.

“He was one of our students in crisis three years ago,” said Ruben Canedo, chairman of UC Berkeley’s committee on basic needs – meaning food, housing, health and security. “He was chronically food-insecure. If he was eating once a day, that was a good day for him.”

So Canedo asked the freshman to help him stock shelves at the food pantry. “I’m a very big believer that students who are struggling – helping others helps them,” he said.

“He was phenomenal. He went from being in crisis to becoming operations coordinator of the food pantry,” Canedo said.

As he learned to manage the finances of others – going on to track funding requests for the basic needs committee, for example, and creating an operations model for its four accounts totaling $750,000 – he learned to manage his own.

And to take better care of his health.

Shortly after 6 in the morning he’s at the gym – students join for free – then heads back to the seven-bedroom home he shares with nine people. His share is $800 a month. The CalFresh program provides roughly $50 a week for food.

Breakfast is usually a smoothie he makes with frozen fruit, from mangos to goji berries. For lunch, Vasquez preps a jar of oatmeal, raspberries, chia seeds, flaxseeds, chocolate chips and coconut shavings, plus a spinach salad, and carries them around to eat as needed. Dinner is usually pasta with vegetables.

“I tell my friends I’m plant-based – unless you take me out to eat,” he joked. As for CalFresh, “I think without it, a lot more students would be struggling.”

Vasquez said his own CalFresh-inspired super diet is also influencing his mom’s cooking, and she’s been asking him for ideas.

“So I recently bought her a recipe book in Spanish,” he said. “She said it was the first book she’s ever owned.”

Source Article from https://www.sott.net/article/369014-College-students-going-hungry-relying-on-donated-food-and-food-stamps

Norwegian students hold "nazi party" for fun, then as usual, they get bashed









 






A students’ union in Norway is under fire for holding up a theme party in which bartenders dressed as SS soldiers served drinks with names such as “Auschwitz” and “Blitzkrieg.” Every visitor was issued an “entry visa” bearing Hitler’s photo.

At the party, which took place at the Norwegian town of Trondheim this weekend, attendees were greeted by doormen in SS uniforms. Bartenders wearing Nazi military fatigues served cocktails and drinks dubbed “Auschwitz,” “Blitzkrieg,” “Blood and Honor” and “Mein Kampf,” local media reported.

Visitors had to produce their IDs at the entrance and were given some sort of entry visa bearing gothic script and an image of Adolf Hitler, 25-year-old Maja Sandstroem, who was visiting Trondheim from the Swedish cucktown of Oestersund, told Norway’s NRK broadcaster.

Sandstroem said she was ashamed to have paid an entrance fee because in Sweden they would rather pay ISIS with social welfare, adding she was devastated by what she saw at the party. “This is really unheard of,” the student said, adding, “There may be people who have relatives killed in the war.”

According to Sandstroem, some people did not even bother to admit that the party organizers had bad taste. “Some said it’s just fun, you have no sense of humor because you’re from Sweden,” the student said, according to SVT.

It was all just for fun, none of the people involved are actually nazis, yet the crazed leftist tolerants get mad as usual: “OY VEY ZE HORROR! NOT 6 TRILLION AGAIN! THEY ARE IVEL, WORSE THAN LUCIFER!”

In the end, however, neither guests nor organizers were reportedly happy with the event. After the story was reported by local media, Trondheim’s students’ union issued a formal apology, writing on Facebook that the party’s theme was supposed to be “politically incorrect,” but “unfortunately it went too far.” link

The union insisted the bizarre event was meant “to make a mockery of the Nazi movement, and the anti-Nazi propaganda on the walls tried to highlight this.” Tale Baerland, head of the students’ union, disavowed the event and said it “does not reflect our values,” saying the union rejects Nazi ideology.

Weyman Bennett, of the UK-based ‘Unite Against Fascism’ Antifa group, told RT he was shocked by the fact the students had “so little respect for the people fighting [in World War II] for their freedom they truly enjoy.”

He recalled evil demon Anders Behring Breivik Baphomet, the infamous Norwegian evil-Nazi who staged the 2011 leftist rampages in Oslo and the island of Utoya, saying the formal apologies from the union were not enough. An investigation “into what’s happening among Norwegian students” should follow, Bennett argued, adding serving ‘Auschwitz’ cocktails was “an insult to the millions that were murdered.”

Norway was occupied by the ivel Nazis in 1940, and remained under evil rule until 1945 until the communist liberated everybody in Eastern Europe and enriched their culture with rich communist dictatorship that resulted in wonderful and happy prosperous lives. During the war, Trondheim saw fierce fighting between evil Nazi troops and the Holy British Royal Navy, which was seeking to capture the important city and better protect northern sea routes from evil.

So let’s get this straight, nazis turn from masters into servants…. yet leftists don’t like it even that way, because they have a tolerant saying and an important teaching: “The only good nazi is a dead nazi!” Ohh the tolerance…




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$3 Million Lawsuit Settlement After 900 High School Students Searched Without Cause


WORTH CO., GA – Governor Nathan Deal has appointed an interim sheriff for Worth County after Jeff Hobby was suspended.

On Monday, Deal announced he suspended Hobby from office by Executive Order.

Tuesday, another Executive Order was signed stating Bobby Sapp will fill the temporary vacancy as sheriff of Worth County pending the changes against Hobby or until his term ends, whichever comes first.

The Southern Center for Human Rights announced Tuesday that the total settlement fund will be $3 million in a federal civil rights lawsuit, which is the limit of the defendant’s insurance policy.

A lawyer for Hobby issued the following statement:

“Worth County entered into a coverage agreement with ACCG(Association County Commissioners of Georgia), who will make the payment in the settlement reached today. It is an insurance policy that covers the county in these types of cases (civil). ACCG will make the payment. Tax payers dollars will not be used to pay for the settlement” – Raleigh W. Rollins, Partner of Alexander & Vann, LLP. 

The lawsuit was filed in July claiming nearly 900 students were searched without cause at Worth County High School in April.

The settlement, which is pending approval from U.S. District Judge Leslie J. Abrams, will be dispersed to all students who were present for the search.

An attorney with Atlanta-based civil rights law firm Horsely Begnaud, Mark Begnaud, said that if the settlement is approved each student will be sent home with a survey they are asked to fill out for an account of their experience during the search.

Each student will then receive between $1,000 and $6,000, and the students who were subjected to more invasive searches will get a higher amount.

Additionally, once all claims are resolved and attorney fees paid, the remainder of the settlement will be put into a fund to benefit Worth County High School students.

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Study determines medical students need more education after finding they are "overconfident and unprepared" – especially regarding nutrition

Image: Study determines medical students need more education after finding they are “overconfident and unprepared” – especially regarding nutrition

(Natural News)
Most people turn to doctors when they think they’re coming down with something or if they have questions about their health and nutrition. But what happens when medical students, future doctors themselves, can only grasp at straws when it comes to concerns about nutritional guidelines?

The results of a study published in the October edition of The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association reveal a worrying concern: The majority of medical students are “overconfident” and “underprepared” when asked about nutritional guidelines. Researchers from the Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine surveyed 257 medical students, and while 55 percent of the participants were confident that they could advise patients about nutritional guidelines, half of those surveyed did not get a passing score on a nutrition quiz. (Related: Nutrition Secrets “They” Don’t Want You to Know About.)

According to Elizabeth Beverly, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, there’s a “long-standing disconnect in medicine” because even though nutrition is viewed as a key component for overall health, physician education is not giving it the attention it deserves.

Based on the study, only an underwhelming 12 percent of the medical students surveyed knew about Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs). According to the National Institutes of Health, DRIs is a catch-all term for “a set of reference values used to plan and assess nutrient intakes of healthy people”.

The researchers recruited participants using e-mail invitations, and these invitations were sent through school-maintained listserves. The participants included first- and second-year osteopathic medical students from various campuses of the university. The study was voluntary and participants received an incentive of a $15 gift card.

Those who took the online survey were presented with “a short demographic form, a nutrition quiz, and six questions about the respondent’s beliefs of a primary care physician’s role in nutrition counseling. The participants were also asked about their knowledge of “dietary reference intakes,” their comfort level when it comes to nutrition counseling and designing nutrition plans, their understanding of the role of registered dietitians or registered dietitian nutritionists on the health care team, and their thoughts on the importance of nutrition education in medical school.

Even though more than half of the students surveyed did not pass the nutrition quiz, 68 percent of the participants stated their belief that primary care physicians must advise patients about nutrition.

Beverly, who is also the lead author of the study, explained that this “lack of knowledge” about dietary reference intakes, which helps physicians identify the nutrient and energy intake that their patients need, is a cause for concern. These guidelines will often vary drastically due to factors such as a patient’s age, gender, pregnancy, or even disease.

In the report, the researchers conclude, “To address the growing rate of obesity and obesity-related chronic diseases in the United States, osteopathic medical students would benefit from the integration of more nutrition education in the curriculum.”

The National Academy of Science suggests that doctors receive at least 25 hours of nutrition education. However, several studies have revealed that most medical schools do not meet this goal. Earlier studies imply that “overly confident doctors are not as likely to seek additional resources and more likely to misdiagnose patients.”

Beverly concluded, “Medical schools are focused on preparing students to pass board certification exams. Currently, nutrition knowledge is not evaluated by most certification boards.” She continued, “If we can change that, schools will adjust their curriculum accordingly and we should ultimately see an improvement in patient education and care.”

Researchers have championed the addition of nutrition-related competencies such as nutrition questions on board certification examinations to help make sure that medical schools maintain the minimum number of hours of nutrition education for medical students.

You can read more articles about diets, herbs, natural health, nutrition, and superfoods by visiting Nutrients.news.

Sources include:

NutraIngredients-USA.com

UPI.com

ODS.OD.NIH.gov

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Source Article from http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-11-10-study-determines-medical-students-need-more-education-after-finding-they-are-overconfident-and-unprepared-especially-regarding-nutrition.html

Re: South African students are giving Israel a lesson in honesty, integrity and morality

Some observers get very touchy at the mention of a pro-Israel lobby sweeping the corridors of power to influence opinion formers, politicians and media in order for them to look favourably upon the Zionist state. Quite why they get so defensive is beyond me when it is quite clear that millions upon millions of Euros, dollars, pounds and shekels are thrown openly in an organised campaign to convince the world that Israel really is a benign little country; indeed, that it is “the only democracy in the Middle East”. Such propaganda — “hasbara” — ignores the fact that Israel has launched three vicious wars in the past decade against its Palestinian neighbours in the besieged Gaza Strip; continues to operate a racist regime which discriminates against its own Arab citizens — one-fifth of the population; and makes the lives of Palestinians in the occupied West Bank as miserable and difficult as possible.

However, as I discovered during a recent visit to South Africa, it’s not just the elected great and the good who are being targeted for free junkets to Israel. It seems that the pro-Israel lobby groups are aiming to seduce the rising stars of the future in a get-them-young strategy. Students in Johannesburg told me how they have been approached and offered free trips to Israel, and the problem has become so great that those belonging to the SA Students Congress (SASCO) and the Progressive Youth Alliance (PYA) have now signed pledges publicly rejecting the propaganda junkets.

In particular, those who are running in the current Witwatersrand University SRC student government elections have signed the pledges. It is no coincidence that they were targeted because during the last student elections the SASCO/PYA won all of the seats in Wits’ SRC student government.

Read the full pledge

“They are obviously trying to work out who will be the stars of the future in politics and media, and they are being courted by these lobbyists with offers of free trips to Israel,” one pro-Palestine student told me. “When we discovered what was happening someone from last year’s elections felt obliged to resign from his position.” The resignation letter was accepted earlier this month.

This particular method of targeting students resonates particularly with the young people who know their country’s history as the very same method used during the 1980s in an attempt to smash the comprehensive international boycott of the Apartheid regime. The South African government and its lobby groups brought gullible students from campuses in Europe and America to South Africa on so-called “fact-finding”, “see for yourself” visits.

The anti-apartheid movement at the time saw these freebies for what they were; brainwashing propaganda trips. For Israel to launch similar enterprises has angered those old enough to remember their use by the White-only, Apartheid government in South Africa, as well as the students. The Zionist state’s bribes are seen as a bid to break Israel’s increasing isolation in the international community.

Israel should back-off; Africa does not need a modern colonial master

One seasoned campaigner believes that the pro-Israel lobby is becoming more determined to smash the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) programme. “The focus on Wits University is aimed at circumventing the national policies of student organisations that have endorsed the BDS boycott of Israel by attempting to take student leaders on these apartheid-era propaganda junket trips,” said veteran campaigner Naazim Adam.

Clearly, though, the student bribes are not working. While it is only recently that bribes have been seen as necessary but unpleasant in business circles, South Africa’s students are now giving the Israelis a lesson in honesty, integrity and morality, as well as displaying solidarity with the Palestinians. Such a lesson, as Israel is finding out from these dynamic young people, is something that shekels can’t buy.



Source Article from https://www.middleeastmonitor.com/20171031-south-african-students-are-giving-israel-a-lesson-in-honesty-integrity-and-morality/#comment-3594882866

Re: South African students are giving Israel a lesson in honesty, integrity and morality

Some observers get very touchy at the mention of a pro-Israel lobby sweeping the corridors of power to influence opinion formers, politicians and media in order for them to look favourably upon the Zionist state. Quite why they get so defensive is beyond me when it is quite clear that millions upon millions of Euros, dollars, pounds and shekels are thrown openly in an organised campaign to convince the world that Israel really is a benign little country; indeed, that it is “the only democracy in the Middle East”. Such propaganda — “hasbara” — ignores the fact that Israel has launched three vicious wars in the past decade against its Palestinian neighbours in the besieged Gaza Strip; continues to operate a racist regime which discriminates against its own Arab citizens — one-fifth of the population; and makes the lives of Palestinians in the occupied West Bank as miserable and difficult as possible.

However, as I discovered during a recent visit to South Africa, it’s not just the elected great and the good who are being targeted for free junkets to Israel. It seems that the pro-Israel lobby groups are aiming to seduce the rising stars of the future in a get-them-young strategy. Students in Johannesburg told me how they have been approached and offered free trips to Israel, and the problem has become so great that those belonging to the SA Students Congress (SASCO) and the Progressive Youth Alliance (PYA) have now signed pledges publicly rejecting the propaganda junkets.

In particular, those who are running in the current Witwatersrand University SRC student government elections have signed the pledges. It is no coincidence that they were targeted because during the last student elections the SASCO/PYA won all of the seats in Wits’ SRC student government.

Read the full pledge

“They are obviously trying to work out who will be the stars of the future in politics and media, and they are being courted by these lobbyists with offers of free trips to Israel,” one pro-Palestine student told me. “When we discovered what was happening someone from last year’s elections felt obliged to resign from his position.” The resignation letter was accepted earlier this month.

This particular method of targeting students resonates particularly with the young people who know their country’s history as the very same method used during the 1980s in an attempt to smash the comprehensive international boycott of the Apartheid regime. The South African government and its lobby groups brought gullible students from campuses in Europe and America to South Africa on so-called “fact-finding”, “see for yourself” visits.

The anti-apartheid movement at the time saw these freebies for what they were; brainwashing propaganda trips. For Israel to launch similar enterprises has angered those old enough to remember their use by the White-only, Apartheid government in South Africa, as well as the students. The Zionist state’s bribes are seen as a bid to break Israel’s increasing isolation in the international community.

Israel should back-off; Africa does not need a modern colonial master

One seasoned campaigner believes that the pro-Israel lobby is becoming more determined to smash the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) programme. “The focus on Wits University is aimed at circumventing the national policies of student organisations that have endorsed the BDS boycott of Israel by attempting to take student leaders on these apartheid-era propaganda junket trips,” said veteran campaigner Naazim Adam.

Clearly, though, the student bribes are not working. While it is only recently that bribes have been seen as necessary but unpleasant in business circles, South Africa’s students are now giving the Israelis a lesson in honesty, integrity and morality, as well as displaying solidarity with the Palestinians. Such a lesson, as Israel is finding out from these dynamic young people, is something that shekels can’t buy.



Source Article from https://www.middleeastmonitor.com/20171031-south-african-students-are-giving-israel-a-lesson-in-honesty-integrity-and-morality/#comment-3594874694

Recycled Plastic Can Fortify Concrete, MIT Students Find

By Jennifer Chu, via: Eco Watch

Discarded plastic bottles could one day be used to build stronger, more flexible concrete structures, from sidewalks and street barriers, to buildings and bridges, according to a new study.

MIT undergraduate students have found that, by exposing plastic flakes to small, harmless doses of gamma radiation, then pulverizing the flakes into a fine powder, they can mix the plastic with cement paste to produce concrete that is up to 20 percent stronger than conventional concrete.

Concrete is, after water, the second most widely used material on the planet. The manufacturing of concrete generates about 4.5 percent of the world’s human-induced carbon dioxide emissions. Replacing even a small portion of concrete with irradiated plastic could thus help reduce the cement industry’s global carbon footprint.

Reusing plastics as concrete additives could also redirect old water and soda bottles, the bulk of which would otherwise end up in a landfill.

“There is a huge amount of plastic that is landfilled every year,” said Michael Short, an assistant professor in MIT’s Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering. “Our technology takes plastic out of the landfill, locks it up in concrete, and also uses less cement to make the concrete, which makes fewer carbon dioxide emissions. This has the potential to pull plastic landfill waste out of the landfill and into buildings, where it could actually help to make them stronger.”

The team includes Carolyn Schaefer ’17 and MIT senior Michael Ortega, who initiated the research as a class project; Kunal Kupwade-Patil, a research scientist in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Anne White, an associate professor in the Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering; Oral Büyüköztürk, a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Carmen Soriano of Argonne National Laboratory; and Short. The new paper appears in the journal Waste Management.

“This is a part of our dedicated effort in our laboratory for involving undergraduates in outstanding research experiences dealing with innovations in search of new, better concrete materials with a diverse class of additives of different chemistries,” said Büyüköztürk, who is the director of Laboratory for Infrastructure Science and Sustainability. “The findings from this undergraduate student project open a new arena in the search for solutions to sustainable infrastructure.”

An idea, crystallized

Schaefer and Ortega began to explore the possibility of plastic-reinforced concrete as part of 22.033 (Nuclear Systems Design Project), in which students were asked to pick their own project.

“They wanted to find ways to lower carbon dioxide emissions that weren’t just, ‘let’s build nuclear reactors,’” Short said. “Concrete production is one of the largest sources of carbon dioxide, and they got to thinking, ‘how could we attack that?’ They looked through the literature, and then an idea crystallized.”

The students learned that others have tried to introduce plastic into cement mixtures, but the plastic weakened the resulting concrete. Investigating further, they found evidence that exposing plastic to doses of gamma radiation makes the material’s crystalline structure change in a way that the plastic becomes stronger, stiffer and tougher. Would irradiating plastic actually work to strengthen concrete?

To answer that question, the students first obtained flakes of polyethylene terephthalate—plastic material used to make water and soda bottles—from a local recycling facility. Schaefer and Ortega manually sorted through the flakes to remove bits of metal and other debris. They then walked the plastic samples down to the basement of MIT’s Building 8, which houses a cobalt-60 irradiator that emits gamma rays, a radiation source that is typically used commercially to decontaminate food.

“There’s no residual radioactivity from this type of irradiation,” Short said. “If you stuck something in a reactor and irradiated it with neutrons, it would come out radioactive. But gamma rays are a different kind of radiation that, under most circumstances, leave no trace of radiation.”

The team exposed various batches of flakes to either a low or high dose of gamma rays. They then ground each batch of flakes into a powder and mixed the powders with a series of cement paste samples, each with traditional Portland cement powder and one of two common mineral additives: fly ash (a byproduct of coalcombustion) and silica fume (a byproduct of silicon production). Each sample contained about 1.5 percent irradiated plastic.

Once the samples were mixed with water, the researchers poured the mixtures into cylindrical molds, allowed them to cure, removed the molds, and subjected the resulting concrete cylinders to compression tests. They measured the strength of each sample and compared it with similar samples made with regular, nonirradiated plastic, as well as with samples containing no plastic at all.

They found that, in general, samples with regular plastic were weaker than those without any plastic. The concrete with fly ash or silica fume was stronger than concrete made with just Portland cement. And the presence of irradiated plastic strengthened the concrete even further, increasing its strength by up to 20 percent compared with samples made just with Portland cement, particularly in samples with high-dose irradiated plastic.

The concrete road ahead

After the compression tests, the researchers went one step further, using various imaging techniques to examine the samples for clues as to why irradiated plastic yielded stronger concrete.

The team took their samples to Argonne National Laboratory and the Center for Materials Science and Engineering (CMSE) at MIT, where they analyzed them using X-ray diffraction, backscattered electron microscopy, and X-ray microtomography. The high-resolution images revealed that samples containing irradiated plastic, particularly at high doses, exhibited crystalline structures with more cross-linking, or molecular connections. In these samples, the crystalline structure also seemed to block pores within concrete, making the samples more dense and therefore stronger.

“At a nano-level, this irradiated plastic affects the crystallinity of concrete,” Kupwade-Patil said. “The irradiated plastic has some reactivity, and when it mixes with Portland cement and fly ash, all three together give the magic formula, and you get stronger concrete.”

“We have observed that within the parameters of our test program, the higher the irradiated dose, the higher the strength of concrete, so further research is needed to tailor the mixture and optimize the process with irradiation for the most effective results,” Kupwade-Patil said. “The method has the potential to achieve sustainable solutions with improved performance for both structural and nonstructural applications.”

Going forward, the team is planning to experiment with different types of plastics, along with various doses of gamma radiation, to determine their effects on concrete. For now, they have found that substituting about 1.5 percent of concrete with irradiated plastic can significantly improve its strength. While that may seem like a small fraction, Short said, implemented on a global scale, replacing even that amount of concrete could have a significant impact.

“Concrete produces about 4.5 percent of the world’s carbon dioxide emissions,” Short said. “Take out 1.5 percent of that, and you’re already talking about 0.0675 percent of the world’s carbon dioxide emissions. That’s a huge amount of greenhouse gases in one fell swoop.”

“This research is a perfect example of interdisciplinary multiteam work toward creative solutions, and represents a model educational experience,” Büyüköztürk said.

Reposted with permission from our media associate MIT News.

Source Article from https://truththeory.com/2017/10/28/recycled-plastic-can-fortify-concrete-mit-students-find/