Moby blasted by liberals for daring to suggest food stamps should be limited to healthy groceries instead of junk food… the NERVE of that guy


Image: Moby blasted by liberals for daring to suggest food stamps should be limited to healthy groceries instead of junk food… the NERVE of that guy

(Natural News)
Earlier this month, electronic pop music star Moby made an argument that has the liberals absolutely outraged. What was the argument, you might ask? That food stamps shouldn’t pay for junk food – because God forbid somebody insists that taxpayer money shouldn’t be used on welfare recipients looking to stock up on Twinkies and Ho-Hos (sarcasm intended).

“Right now, a congressional arm-wrestling match is pitting those who want to preserve funding for SNAP against those who want to gut it,” Moby wrote in an op-ed for the Wall Street Journal, adding that while SNAP really does help people in need, “it also puts a lot of unhealthful food on America’s plate.” The music star continued, “Its costs are huge, as are the added costs of treating diabetes, hypertension and other illnesses that poor eating habits cause.”

Truthfully, this argument seems like a rational solution to both health problems in the United States and wasteful spending within our welfare system. If welfare recipients are going to be getting money from the federal government (aka the American taxpayers), then it only makes sense that the money should be solely for healthy food instead of candy bars and chocolate cake. But like with most other rational solutions that have been proposed to solve the problems America faces, the liberals are standing in the way.

Indeed, Moby faced a substantial amount of backlash after writing his piece for the Wall Street Journal. Liberal feminist and senior staff writer at Upworthy.com Parker Molloy took to Twitter and wrote, “Things Moby’s op-ed doesn’t address: 1, food deserts, 2, the fact that healthy food can be expensive, 3, the fact that some families on SNAP might not have the time/equipment to prepare healthy foods.” Another liberal blogger with the Twitter username “jes skolnik / texas calboy” wrote, “dear moby this is a bad and classist opinion other people’s bodies are none of yr business.”

Regarding Parker Molloy’s comment that healthy food can be expensive and that some families might not have time to prepare healthy food, here’s an idea that could enrage leftists even more than Moby’s comments in the Wall Street Journal: How about some of these welfare recipients find work so that they can more easily afford healthier foods? The idea that the American taxpayers have to subsidize bad eating habits just because buying healthy food would be mildly inconvenient to welfare recipients is absurd. (Related: In a shocking interview, a welfare recipient admitted to sitting at home, smoking weed and waiting for government money.)

Past research has shown that an enormous amount of welfare money is being spent on sweets and non-essential food products. According to a report published by the United States Department of Agriculture, Americans use food stamps to buy over $600 million worth of “sweetened beverages,” in addition to hundreds of millions more of sugary snacks and unhealthy foods.

Specifically, food stamps worth roughly $1.3 billion were spent on “sweetened drinks, desserts, salty snacks, candy, and sugar,” which accounted for about one-fifth of every dollar spent on food items purchased by 26.5 million households in the year 2011, according to the report. (Related: Children of welfare recipients are more likely to become dependent on government handouts.)

The main problem with this is that, obviously, the excessive consumption of sugary foods and drinks leads to poor health, and when welfare recipients experience a decline in health, then they rely on the American taxpayers again for medical expenses. Contrary to what the liberals tend to believe, our country’s welfare system should strive to make people more self-sufficient in the long run, not less. There’s a lot of work that needs to be done to reform the entire welfare system, but a good starting point would be to require that welfare money is used solely for healthy food products.

Find more news on healthy food choices at Food.news.

Sources include:

Eater.com

Breitbart.com

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Source Article from http://www.naturalnews.com/2018-04-17-moby-blasted-by-liberals-for-daring-to-suggest-food-stamps-should-be-limited-to-healthy-groceries-instead-of-junk-food.html

Trump Tower fire shows why every home should have fire sprinklers

It’s not just about the fire either; it’s also about flame retardants and health.

Last week a man died on the 50th floor of the Trump Tower in New York City. The residential portion of the building did not have sprinklers; they did not become mandatory until 1998 and residential buildings did not have to be retrofitted. Then-developer Donald Trump, like most developers, complained that doing so is really expensive and retrofits are often ugly.

This is true; one either has ugly exposed pipes, or drop ceilings or bulkheads all over and it makes a real mess. It’s fine and easy in lofts where exposed pipes are a feature, not a bug, but not in fancy Fifth Avenue suites. Even in Florida, where residential sprinkler retrofits are required, condo owners can get out of it if they provide other safety measures and install them in the corridors.

fire at trump tower© LAURA BONILLA CAL/AFP/Getty Images

This is one event you really can’t blame Donald Trump for; nobody wanted to retrofit over occupants’ heads. He had another under construction at the time the law was passed and was also exempt, but because nobody was living in it yet, he was able to put sprinklers in at a cost of $ 3 million, acknowledging at the time that “people feel safer with sprinklers.”

Even his tweet, which many considered insensitive for not mentioning the victim, was true; the principle of fire protection at the time was to design an enclosure that would confine the fire and limit its spread for long enough that the fire department could respond to the alarm and put it out. And it did, albeit not before the fire killed the owner of the apartment. Alas, the theory is that there should be smoke detectors within the suite to warn the owner to get out, and they clearly didn’t.

The problem in a modern concrete, steel and drywall building is not the structure burning, but all the stuff in it. Here the owner had a lot of stuff, including “hundreds of guitars and ukeleles” that would burn nicely. Furniture with polyurethane foam cushions burn nicely too, even when they are full of toxic brominated fire retardants. There are also retardants in drapes, carpets and electronics. As I noted in an earlier post:

When retardant-laden materials do catch fire, (retardants, by definition, only slow it down) the chemicals are dangerous to breathe. One report says “The International Association of Firefighters supports bans on these chemicals because firefighters have been shown to be at much higher risk of cancer, heart, lung and other debilitating diseases caused by the dangerous gases created when fire retardants burn. If you are in your home when a fire starts, you are exposed to them too.”

If we want to live in a healthy environment, we have to get rid of these flame retardants. To do that we should be using natural materials and minimizing the risk of fire by having sprinklers in every home, not just the ones in high rises.

masksMasks can give you 60 minutes of air/Promo image

If you are going to live in an older building that doesn’t have sprinklers, invest in a whole bunch of hard-wired and battery powered smoke detectors. Mix them all up with both photoelectric and ionizing units. If your vision and hearing isn’t top notch, get the ones with lights. Since 80 percent of the deaths in fires are caused by smoke inhalation, many people are buying these smoke masks that everyone has in Japan, $35 at Amazon.

It is another good reason to get rid of stuff and go minimalist. Don’t add to the fire load and don’t block the way to the exit. And sell that guitar collection.

Source Article from https://www.treehugger.com/green-architecture/every-home-should-have-fire-sprinklers.html

Every home should have fire sprinklers

It’s not just about the fire either; it’s also about flame retardants and health.

Last week a man died on the 50th floor of the Trump Tower in New York City. The residential portion of the building did not have sprinklers; they did not become mandatory until 1998 and residential buildings did not have to be retrofitted. Then-developer Donald Trump, like most developers, complained that doing so is really expensive and retrofits are often ugly.

This is true; one either has ugly exposed pipes, or drop ceilings or bulkheads all over and it makes a real mess. It’s fine and easy in lofts where exposed pipes are a feature, not a bug, but not in fancy Fifth Avenue suites. Even in Florida, where residential sprinkler retrofits are required, condo owners can get out of it if they provide other safety measures and install them in the corridors.

fire at trump tower© LAURA BONILLA CAL/AFP/Getty Images

This is one event you really can’t blame Donald Trump for; nobody wanted to retrofit over occupants’ heads. He had another under construction at the time the law was passed and was also exempt, but because nobody was living in it yet, he was able to put sprinklers in at a cost of $ 3 million, acknowledging at the time that “people feel safer with sprinklers.”

Even his tweet, which many considered insensitive for not mentioning the victim, was true; the principle of fire protection at the time was to design an enclosure that would confine the fire and limit its spread for long enough that the fire department could respond to the alarm and put it out. And it did, albeit not before the fire killed the owner of the apartment. Alas, the theory is that there should be smoke detectors within the suite to warn the owner to get out, and they clearly didn’t.

The problem in a modern concrete, steel and drywall building is not the structure burning, but all the stuff in it. And here the owner had a lot of stuff, including “hundreds of guitars and ukeleles” that would burn nicely. Furniture with polyurethane foam cushions burn nicely too, even when they are full of toxic brominated fire retardants. There are also retardants in drapes, carpets and electronics. As I noted in an earlier post:

When retardant-laden materials do catch fire, (retardants, by definition, only slow it down) the chemicals are dangerous to breathe. One report says “The International Association of Firefighters supports bans on these chemicals because firefighters have been shown to be at much higher risk of cancer, heart, lung and other debilitating diseases caused by the dangerous gases created when fire retardants burn. If you are in your home when a fire starts, you are exposed to them too.”

If we want to live in a healthy environment, we have to get rid of these flame retardants. To do that we should be using natural materials and minimizing the risk of fire by having sprinklers in every home, not just the ones in high rises.

masksMasks can give you 60 minutes of air/Promo image

If you are going to live in an older building that doesn’t have sprinklers, invest in a whole bunch of hard-wired and battery powered smoke detectors. Mix them all up with both photoelectric and ionizing units. If your vision and hearing isn’t top notch, get the ones with lights. Since 80 percent of the deaths in fires are caused by smoke inhalation, many people are buying these smoke masks that everyone has in Japan, $35 at Amazon.

It is another good reason to get rid of stuff, to go minimalist, don’t add to the fire load and don’t block the way to the exit. And sell that guitar collection.

Source Article from https://www.treehugger.com/green-architecture/every-home-should-have-fire-sprinklers.html

Cities around the world should prepare for running out of water, experts say

It’s called “Day Zero”: when Cape Town, South Africa’s bustling port city, sees its water taps run dry, and its population thrust into a perilous situation.

Originally projected for this year, the impending crisis has been delayed in part by severe measures — the city instituted restrictions that amount to less than one sixth of an average American’s water consumption. Yet despite that effort, “Day Zero” is still projected to arrive next year.

And when it comes, the crisis will see the government switching off all the taps and rationing the resource through collection points.

That future isn’t just Cape Town’s. It’s a scenario cities around the globe may face, experts say.

It may be hard to fathom just how cities could be at risk of a water scarcity crisis when approximately 70 percent of the world is made up of the resource. The stark reality, however, is that the percentage of fresh water probably only amounts to about 2.5 percent, according to often-cited assessments.

Source Article from http://govtslaves.info/2018/04/cities-around-the-world-should-prepare-for-running-out-of-water-experts-say/

PREPPERS: Picking The Best Handgun Night Sight-5 You Should Consider

Let’s be honest. Handgun night sights are all pretty similar. What really are the differentiating features? In this article, we will get down into the nitty gritty and compare some similar night sights.

The sights that we will be reviewing are made by XS, Truglo, Night Fision, Trijicon and AmeriGlo. When it’s all said and done, we will give a winner for each category, and then make some buying recommendations at the end.

We will focus on sights that are made for a Glock, but all these brands make sights for multiple weapons. In terms of what we are looking for, we will talk about brightness, target acquisition, size, durability and price.

Before talking about specifics, we will give a brief introduction on each sight.

XS Sights

XS is most commonly known for their DXW Big Dot sight. This sight features a very large painted white dot with tritium inside of the painted ring. The rear sight is a white painted stripe, but a tritium rear sight is available at an added cost.

While they are much less common, XS also makes a more traditional set of sights, which they call the F8. This sight changes up the norm. While most handgun sights utilize three dots, the F8 uses two dots. The rear sight has one dot, which is located below the notch in the sight. Essentially, you place the front dot on top of the rear dot, as opposed to in between two rear dots.

Truglo

Truglo has a pretty wide variety of handgun sights. They have sights that use only fiber optics and only tritium, but they also have their TFO sights which combines the two. These sights are bulkier, as there must be enough space to contain the fiber optic element.

Their TFX sights are similar to the TFO, but they utilize a painted ring around the front dot. The Tritium Pro sights are the same as the standard tritium sights, but with an added painted ring as well. The TFX Pro are their most expensive, and they utilize an orange painted ring for maximum brightness.

Night Fision

Night Fision is relatively new on the scene, and focus on strictly three dot tritium sights. Their sights utilize a tritium front sight with a painted ring. For the paint color, you are able to choose between white, orange and yellow.

For the rear sight, you can choose either square or U-notch. You can choose white paint around the dots, no paint, and you can even choose no tritium at all, and just have a simple U shape.

Trijicon

While they are very popular for their ACOG riflescopes, Trijicon is also well respected for their pistol night sights. These are also simple three dot style tritium sights, and you can choose between a yellow or orange front ring. The rear sights are a U shape, similar to the previously mentioned Night Fision sights.

Source Article from http://govtslaves.info/2018/04/preppers-picking-the-best-handgun-night-sight-5-you-should-consider/

NYPD Wants Your License For Facial Recognition. Should They Gain This Power?



Next Story

According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, the NYPD’s Real Time Crime Center and Facial Identification Sections would like to get full and unfettered access to the state’s database of driver’s licenses.

Currently, the police department is limited to mugshots of criminals within their own facial identification database. Now they want the ability to match facial images with identity for the millions of people who drive cars within the state of New York.

Why is law enforcement asking for facial identification capabilities over innocent, law-abiding folks? An article on the subject suggests that such a capability could help the department to identify lost adults with cognitive disorders like Alzheimer’s; it could help hospitals put names to unconscious patients who are admitted without ID; and if expanded, it could aid in interstate law enforcement efforts to find criminals that live under false identities.

What Price Hath Privacy? 

Do such piecemeal benefits justify the removal of yet another brick from our personal sanctuaries of privacy?

A proposed expansion of capabilities in governmental programs always requires the vigilance of concerned citizens. As technology has evolved, the power of surveillance has risen exponentially. The potential and far-reaching implications, not just in the present but for the future, need to be in the forefront of our minds and a topic of our deeper discussions.

Typically, such inquiries eventually lead to the question, ‘What might happen if these capabilities fell into the wrong hands?’

This question may be more prescient to the case than it appears. And rather than focusing on the NYPD’s ability to protect their technology and freshly-inherited citizen database from external cybertheft, we might be better served to simply ask ourselves: Is the New York Police Department—itself—the ‘wrong hands’?

Tools Of Power?

Not to make us fearful but more so to reflect, do we believe that this law enforcement agency consistently adheres to its stated commitment to ‘Protect the lives and property of our fellow citizens and impartially enforce the law’? Or do we have reason to believe that has the potential to move the needle closer to a dystopian police state? In the bigger scheme of things, are there times when an agency such as this serves—in whole and in part—the agendas of the Deep State?

If we are realistic about the reach of the Deep State, then we have to acknowledge their well-honed ability to infiltrate and control any discrete entities under the broad purview of government. If, for example, they became more capable of locating and targeting ordinary citizens, some of whom they may identify as ‘enemies of the state,’ it could certainly supplement the current and future tools they use to neutralize dissent.

Here’s Edward Snowdon on the dangers of this technology:

But regardless of our opinion about the autonomy or integrity of any particular branch or agency of government, as a general rule we might best be served to promote limits on the proliferation of personal information that can give rise to an increased centralization of power. While the consolidation of personal data might help to make certain processes more efficient or effective, it moves us further away from the kind of liberty promised by the forefathers.

Decentralization

The original purpose for image-mounted driver’s licenses is to help maintain safety and accountability on our roadways. Few would disagree that the ends justify the means in this case, if the Department of Motor Vehicles maintains this information in the strictest of confidence.

Now–if there are some other ways that society can benefit from the existence of the DMV database, why wouldn’t we empower the DMV itself to govern those additional processes so that the information remains as private as possible? If, for example, the NYPD wanted to ascertain the identity of an unconscious person who had been admitted to hospital, it could submit a picture of the patient to the DMV who could conduct the search within their secured database, and only provide information back to the NYPD if they find a positive match.

Less efficient and effective? Perhaps we need to remain ready to pay that price for our privacy. heart-based reflection, without becoming fearful, is the key here.


The Shamanic Way of Healing

The Sacred Science follows eight people from around the world, with varying physical and psychological illnesses, as they embark on a one-month healing journey into the heart of the Amazon jungle.

This incredible true story details how ancient shamanic healing methods can work to shift our bodies and minds. here.

Read the incredible true story here.

The Shamanic Way of Healing

8 people with illnesses go into the jungle to heal naturally… read the incredible true story here.

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Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Collective-evolution/~3/mNZviNR9HVE/

According to science reading books should be your priority

reading

    

You’re not doing yourself any favors if you’re in the 26 percent of American adults who haven’t read even part of a book within the past year.

More than a quarter – 26 percent – of American adults admit to not having read even part of a book within the past year. That’s according to statistics coming out of the Pew Research Center. If you’re part of this group, know that science supports the idea that reading is good for you on several levels.

Reading fiction can help you be more open-minded and creative

According to research conducted at the University of Toronto, study participants who read short-story fiction experienced far less need for “cognitive closure” compared with counterparts who read nonfiction essays. Essentially, they tested as more open-minded, compared with the readers of essays. “Although nonfiction reading allows students to learn the subject matter, it may not always help them in thinking about it,” the authors write. “A physician may have an encyclopedic knowledge of his or her subject, but this may not prevent the physician from seizing and freezing on a diagnosis, when additional symptoms point to a different malady.”

People who read books live longer

That’s according to Yale researchers who studied 3,635 people older than 50 and found that those who read books for 30 minutes daily lived an average of 23 months longer than nonreaders or magazine readers. Apparently, the practice of reading books creates cognitive engagement that improves lots of things, including vocabulary, thinking skills, and concentration. It also can affect empathy, social perception, and emotional intelligence, the sum of which helps people stay on the planet longer.

Reading 50 books a year is something you can actually accomplish

While about a book a week might sound daunting, it’s probably doable by even the busiest of people. Writer Stephanie Huston says her thinking that she didn’t have enough time turned out to be a lame excuse. Now that she has made a goal to read 50 books in a year, she says that she has traded wasted time on her phone for flipping pages in bed, on trains, during meal breaks, and while waiting in line. Two months into her challenge, she reports having more peace and satisfaction and improved sleep, while learning more than she thought possible.

Successful people are readers

It’s because high achievers are keen on self-improvement. Hundreds of successful executives have shared with me the books that have helped them get where they aretoday. Need ideas on where to start? Titles that have repeatedly made their lists include: The Hard Thing About Hard Things by Ben Horowitz; Shoe Dog by Phil Knight; Good to Great by Jim Collins; and Losing My Virginity by Richard Branson.

Source Article from https://www.sott.net/article/382171-According-to-science-reading-books-should-be-your-priority

EXCLUSIVE: As Teachers Forced to Beg for Money, Govt Can’t Find $1 BILLION They Should Already Have

teachersteachers

More than 30,000 teachers gathered to protest at the Oklahoma State Capitol this week, and while they are demanding that the state pass a bill that would provide an additional $150 million in education funding, some taxpayers are questioning why the teachers aren’t calling for the government to be held accountable for the way it is spending the money it already has.

While teachers march with signs that say “Fund Our Schools” and they share photos online of dilapidated textbooks that need to be replaced, they are calling on the state to solve their problems by increasing taxes. However, a study conducted by the 1889 Institute revealed that in 2014, only 48 percent of public school revenue came from the state.

The other 41 percent of revenue came from the district and 11 percent came from the federal government. Even if the state increased taxes and allocated more money for the education budget, the state’s more than 500 districts are responsible for determining the salaries of teachers and support staff as long as they are over a state minimum schedule.

Each of the districts is also fully equipped with a superintendent and administrative staff, raising concern among parents about how much school officials are being paid while the teachers who work directly with students receive a significantly lower salary.

Steve Dickson, an Oklahoma resident and political insider, told The Free Thought Project that he started studying the state’s budget for education when he heard teachers complaining about a lack of funds for school supplies.

“The teachers say they don’t have money for class supplies, but I have three kids in elementary school and I probably spend $150 for school supplies for each of them at the beginning of the year—two boxes of crayons, three boxes of Kleenex, Clorox wipes, reams and reams of paper,” Dickson said. “I’m sure the teachers are spending money too, but I don’t think they should have to. I don’t know where the money is going that the school districts are getting.”

Dickson said that when looking at the state’s education budget and the amount that is allocated for each student, he started questioning why the teachers were receiving such low salaries, yet the budget was already so large.

“We have a major corruption problem, and this is my biggest problem with the state government,” Dickson said. “I don’t think teachers get paid enough money and I don’t know anyone that does. If you’re paying $7,000 per student and you have 20 students in a class, that’s $140,000. If the teacher is getting paid $35,000, then where is the rest of the money going?”

Dickson said he is also worried about a number of financial scandals that have recently come to light, and how the state government plans to distribute funds in order to cover the costs of corruption within other state agencies.

In November 2017, the Oklahoma State Department of Health requested $30 million from the State Legislature and claimed that its 2,600 employees would not be paid if the request was not granted by the end of the month.

Interim Health Commissioner Preston Doerflinger said that the funding gap has accumulated over the last 6 years in which department officials regularly overspent on programs and covered it up by funneling money through internal systems.

“The budgets being presented to us were balanced budgets,” Doerflinger said. “At the end of the day, it is fund accounting, but we had monies being moved from various funds—in some cases, restricted funds—to be utilized for operations.”

Last week, a federal report revealed that the Oklahoma City Veterans Affairs Health Care System made $7 million in improper payments to the University of Oklahoma’s medical school in 2015 and 2016. The VA’s inspector general also found that several part-time doctors were being paid for times when there is no evidence that they were treating patients.

In another case, taxpayers in the state will be forced to pay $140 million in emergency funds after the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and the Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences were caught using an expired waiver to receive inflated reimbursements from the Medicare and Medicaid centers.

The waiver program expired in 2001, which means that fraud has been ongoing for the last 17 years. While Oklahoma doctors who treat Medicaid patients are usually reimbursed at around 86 percent, the doctors who treated Medicaid patients through the OU and OSU health sciences centers were being reimbursed at a rate of 140 percent.

The state government was also forced to appropriate an additional $10.1 million for the Education Lottery Trust Fund after it was revealed last year that lottery funds had been used to supplant education funding instead of enhancing it. The actual funds that were budgeted appear to have disappeared, and there is no ongoing public investigation to locate the money.

Despite the fact that each of the scandals listed above has received significant media attention, there are a number of officials who have not faced any charges for their involvement. Instead, the agencies have turned to the state and asked for more money to cover-up the problem, and Dickson told TFTP he believes that the same thing will happen if taxes are increased in the name of additional education funding.     

“We’re paying a lot of money, but we’re not getting enough results for it,” Dickson said. “The teachers certainly aren’t getting paid enough, there’s too much administration, and then we’re raising taxes that I frankly think are going to get diverted to cover the losses from other mismanaged state agencies.”

In addition to money from taxes, the state of Oklahoma uses a variety of methods to fund public education. One of those methods is derived from the fees Oklahoma receives from its Class III Gaming compact with the Native American tribes in the state. In 2016 alone, the state of Oklahoma collected more than $132 million in tribal gaming exclusivity fees under the state-tribal gaming compact, according to an annual report.

Sonya Nevaquaya, a former tribal leader for the Comanche Tribe, told TFTP that while the tribes are forced to abide by strict rules and audits, the state government faces little accountability regarding how it spends the money it receives from the compact, which has totaled more than $1 billion since 2005.

1.123 BILLION DOLLARS has been paid into the state of Oklahoma from all the tribes in Oklahoma that have had a Class III Gaming Compact with the State since 2005,” Nevaquaya said. “This money is supposed to be for education—we the tribes get audited every single year to ensure the State is receiving every cent for Class III gaming if there are findings the state will fine the tribe. My question is, where has all of this money gone and who is auditing the state of Oklahoma for this Gaming Compact money from the tribes?”

Nevaquaya took to Facebook to share her grievances in a status that received more than 13,000 shares in two days. She said her goal was to inspire teachers to start demanding the state government face standards similar to the ones it requires from each of the tribes.

Teachers, ask the governor, ‘where did this 1.123 BILLION dollars go to?” Nevaquaya said. “The Compact expires in 2020—this is where tribal leadership should come together to negotiate a stronger Compact that can allocate money to all school districts and communities for education funding. We also need to have an audit performed on that State Compact gaming money to ensure the tribes and school communities the revenue from the tribal casinos Class III Games given to the state is accounted for by an actual paper trail.”

At the end the day, it is no secret that public school teachers in Oklahoma deserve a higher salary and access to updated textbooks and school supplies. But the long list of scandals that have been revealed in recent months involving the state’s agencies and the glaring lack of accountability among the officials who were involved serve as a reminder that simply increasing taxes will not solve the problems that are plaguing public education in the state of Oklahoma.

Source Article from http://thefreethoughtproject.com/oklahoma-teachers-protest-billions/

Judge Rules Starbuck Coffee Should Carry Cancer Warning


BLuke Miller Truth Theory

A California judge has just ruled that Starbucks and other coffee vendors must add a cancer warning to all coffee sold in California.

The ruling will have the potential to expose multiple companies to millions of dollars worth of fines.

The lawsuit was filed in 2010 by the Council for Education and Research on Toxics (CERT) and is aimed at 90 coffee retailers, which include Starbucks, Diddy Donuts and McDonalds. The suit came in place due to chemicals such as acrylamide, which is thought to be cancer causing.

CERT are proposing that for every exposure to the chemical since 2002 in California shops there should be a penalty of up to $2,500. This could result in hundreds of millions in fines for the companies involved.

Los Angeles judge Elihu Berle said that the companies in question have failed to prove their products do not pose risks and thus ruled in the favour of CERT. The companies have until April 10th to appeal the decision.

A statement from the National Coffee Association (NCA) that said they are likely to be appealing the decision stating. “Cancer warning labels on coffee would be misleading. The U.S. government’s own Dietary Guidelines state that coffee can be part of a healthy lifestyle,”

Judge Berle has said: “Defendants failed to satisfy their burden of proving by a preponderance of evidence that consumption of coffee confers a benefit to human health.”

According to reports published many of the companies have settled prior to Wednesday’s decision, agreeing to add signs to their products about cancer-linked chemicals.

Image Copyright: monticello / 123RF Stock Photo

I am Luke Miller the author of this article, and creator of Potential For Change. I like to blend psychology and spirituality to help you create more happiness in your life.Grab a copy of my free 33 Page Illustrated eBook- Psychology Meets Spirituality- Secrets To A Supercharged Life You Control Here

Source Article from https://truththeory.com/2018/03/30/judge-rules-starbuck-coffee-carry-cancer-warning/

On the Russian diplomat expulsion: ‘Ireland should have avoided jumping on this bandwagon’

Russia was the first country to recognise Irish independence and we have always enjoyed a positive relationship with Moscow, writes Danielle Ryan.

Irish flag

    

If Leo Varadkar finds it appropriate to expel a Russian diplomat at the behest of Theresa May, it’s about time he considered expelling the US military from Shannon. The time has come for Ireland to either drop the pretence of being a neutral country – or to actually start acting like one.

The US and Canada, along with 14 EU countries, have said they will expel Russian diplomats in response to the chemical attack on former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter in Salisbury in early March, which the UK has blamed on Moscow.

The announcements on the expulsions were coordinated on a day when Russia was in a state of national mourning after a devastating fire that killed 64 people, 41 of them children, in a Siberian shopping centre.

One after the other, the vassal states of Europe fell in line. Now it’s our turn.

Jumping on the bandwagon

Ireland should have avoided jumping on this bandwagon, not least because there is still no solid evidence that the Russian government was behind the poisoning of Skripal and his daughter. Alas, the verdict has come before the trial and Theresa May has managed to milk the incident for all it’s worth.

It is totally at odds with our supposed neutrality to act “in solidarity” with Britain over unproven and hotly disputed claims of a Russian chemical attack in Britain while at the same time operating a de facto US military base out of Shannon Airport.

Of 451 military aircraft landings at Shannon in 2017, 402 of them were US military aircraft, according to Shannonwatch. Those flights were in addition to 334 US military-contracted flights carrying the personal weapons of troops that landed at Shannon last year.

We are almost certain that the US government has carried prisoners through Shannon as part of its illegal extraordinary rendition programme. We know they routinely carry weapons through Irish airspace to be used in Middle Eastern wars. But that’s all fine. Let them at it, the Irish government says.

Kowtowing to Britain

Ireland’s decision to kowtow to Britain is perhaps even worse than our turning a blind eye to American activities in Shannon. Britain, our “closest neighbour” who we have chosen to act in solidarity with today, still refuses to help investigations into the 1974 Dublin and Monaghan bombings which took the lives of 34 people.

Since Varadkar is appalled by alleged State-sanctioned killings, he might be interested to learn that successive British governments have also repeatedly blocked Irish requests for an independent inquiry into the murder of solicitor Pat Finucane who was gunned down in his own home in 1989 as he and his family ate dinner together – a murder that was committed with “shocking” levels of British state collusion involving the army, the police and MI5.

Perhaps Varadkar could send a few British diplomats packing over those killings, which are undoubtedly more important to Irish people than an allegedly Russian-ordered assassination in Britain for which we have no proof. Unlikely though, as that won’t earn him a place at the good boys table in Brussels.

Pressure put on lab

London has accused Moscow of not cooperating with the investigation, while at the same time refusing Russia’s request to be sent samples of the nerve agent used on Skripal. Craig Murray, former UK ambassador to Uzbekistan has reported that sources at Porton Down lab were angry at the pressure put on them to claim the nerve agent was manufactured in Russia when in fact they could not say that with certainty.

After a tense meeting, he told the BBC, the scientists agreed to the carefully worded phrasing that the chemical used was “of a type developed by Russia” – in the sense that, to borrow Murray’s comparison, the the laptop or phone you are reading this on was probably manufactured in China, but it could be described as being “of a type developed by the United States”.

We are told there is no plausible alternative to Russian State involvement. That is simply not true. It is possible, for example, that rogue elements within the Russian state acted without the Kremlin’s knowledge.

It is also possible that one of Russia’s adversaries or one of its post-Soviet neighbours was involved – and we know that the ‘Novichok’ programme was based in Uzbekistan, not Russia – and that it was the Americans, after the fall of the Soviet Union, who were involved in dismantling the lab where the nerve agent was tested.

Protecting their own interests

The reality is, Ireland has no way of knowing what happened and we are completely reliant on British intelligence agencies who are only focused on protecting their own interests.

Remember, it was Tony Blair who assured us that British intelligence agencies had “established beyond doubt” that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction – and we know how that turned out.

Much has also been made of the planned extension of the Russian embassy in Dublin – a curious decision for a country which isn’t exactly one of Russia’s biggest concerns on the world stage. Will the Russians use the space for spying purposes? It is not inconceivable to imagine – but it is laughable to think the UK and US are not also engaging in espionage activities in Ireland.

Russia customarily opts for tit-for-tat retaliations to this kind of action. In dancing to London’s tune, we risk damaging a positive relationship with Russia, simply because our leaders are afraid to stand out as contrarians in the EU.

Squandering goodwill

Russia was the first country to recognise Irish independence and we have always enjoyed a positive relationship with Moscow. In recent months, the government has increasingly focused on developing trade ties with Russia. The value of Irish exports to Russia increase by 40 per cent to €500 million last year.

Only a month ago, Minister of State for Trade Pat Breen was talking about attempts to reinvigorate diplomacy and trade between the two countries, which had previously been damaged due to EU sanctions. Following a visit to Moscow, Breen told the Irish Times there were huge opportunities for Irish companies in Russia, particularly in the agricultural sector.

Our decision to expel one Russian diplomat will hardly send shivers down Vladimir Putin’s spine, but there is no good reason in this case for us to jeopardise a flourishing economic and cultural relationship at all.

Russia’s ambassador to Ireland has spoken of the “huge amount of goodwill” between our two countries – something I can vouch for having spent time living in Russia where the mention of Irishness is met with huge levels of enthusiasm as far afield as Vladivostok.

It’s a shame that we are willing to squander some of that goodwill and act against our own economic interests purely to appease Britain and avoid a few minutes on the naughty step in Brussels.

Danielle Ryan is an Irish freelance journalist who has lived in the US, Russia and Hungary.

Source Article from https://www.sott.net/article/381400-On-the-Russian-diplomat-expulsion-Ireland-should-have-avoided-jumping-on-this-bandwagon