Mosul Terror-Bombed to Rubble

Mosul Terror-Bombed to Rubble



by Stephen Lendman (stephenlendman.org – Home – Stephen Lendman)



When America attacks another nation, international, constitutional and US statute laws of war are discarded with imperial arrogance.



They’re for other countries, not the USA, its rules alone followed. The devastating result is always the same. 



Wherever the self-styled “indispensable nation” shows up, mass slaughter, horrendous destruction, utter chaos, and appalling human misery follow.



The battle for Mosul will long be remembered by truth-telling historians and analysts as one of history’s great crimes. Iraq’s long ago thriving second largest city of 1.7 million people was turned to smoldering rubble.



Thousands, maybe tens of thousands, of defenseless civilians were indiscriminately massacred – largely by US-led terror-bombing, leveling residential areas and vital infrastructure, the city turned into a moonscape.



UN humanitarian coordinator for Iraq Lise Grande explained when the battle for Mosul began last October, US-led coalition and Iraqi forces “committed to a humanitarian concept of operations, which puts civilian protection at the center of their battle plan. They committed to do everything possible in order to ensure civilians were protected during the fighting.”



Instead, indiscriminate mass slaughter and destruction took place throughout months of conflict.



In February 1968, AP foreign correspondent Peter Arnett said the following about the battle for Ben Tre:



“It became necessary to destroy the town to save it,” quoting a US military officer. “He was talking about the decision by allied commanders to bomb and shell the town regardless of civilian casualties, to rout the Vietcong.”



The same applies to numerous other US offensives, including the battle for Mosul. The shocking disregard for human lives and welfare defines all US wars – aggressive ones of choice post-WW II in all cases, never for self-defense, humanitarian intervention and democracy building as falsely claimed.



Two surprising neocon/CIA-connected Washington Post articles discussed the utter devastation of months of war on Mosul. 



Maybe Langley was gloating, taking a victory lap, using WaPo to explain the destructive power of America’s military.



One article headlined “How war ravaged the city of Mosul in satellite images,” saying they “show how the conflict has turned a once lively city into rubble.”



Pre-and-post-battle images are stunning – the former taken in November 2015, the latter on July 8. It’s hard comprehending they’re from the same locations in the same city.



They bear testimony to US imperial viciousness. They show high crimes of war and against humanity on an unimaginable scale. 



Destroyed areas look like a nuking aftermath. On the ground, no signs of life are visible – residential areas, hospitals, bridges and other infrastructure leveled.



A second article headlined “After Daesh defeat, a daunting search for bodies in the rubble of Mosul,” saying:



“The streets of Mosul’s Old City are littered with bodies, tangled between shattered stones and remnants of the lives they left behind.”



“In the baking summer heat, exhausted rescue crews are now sifting through the debris of the toughest battle against Daesh, also known as ISIS, in what became its final redoubt in the city.”



“As Iraqi ground troops, US-led coalition jets and Daesh militants pulverized the Old City’s winding maze of streets last week, thousands of civilians were caught in the crossfire.’



“(T)he area is now deserted. (A)ll that remains in the Old City is rubble and unknown (numbers) of bodies” – many thousands massacred indiscriminately, largely defenseless civilians, mostly women and children.



Last fall, Washington redeployed thousands of ISIS fighters from Mosul to Syria. It’s unknown how many remained to draw out months of fighting.



Hundreds of corpses already were found “suffocated under the ruins of their homes,” said WaPo. Other bodies so far lie rotting in streets turned into open-air graves.



Mangled and charred bodies are unrecognizable. In dozens of interviews with survivors, WaPo reporters found no one who hadn’t lost a relative or friend.



All US war theaters bear testimony to its might makes right way of operating. Imperial aims alone matter, nothing else.



VISIT MY NEW WEB SITE: stephenlendman.org (Home – Stephen Lendman). Contact at lendmanstephen@sbcglobal.net.



My newest book as editor and contributor is titled “Flashpoint in Ukraine: How the US Drive for Hegemony Risks WW III.”



http://www.claritypress.com/LendmanIII.html



Listen to cutting-edge discussions with distinguished guests on the Progressive Radio News Hour on the Progressive Radio Network.


Source Article from https://www.freedomsphoenix.com/Article/221756-2017-07-17-mosul-terror-bombed-to-rubble.htm?EdNo=001&From=RSS

Amid the rubble of Mosul, bitter memories and the stench of death

MOSUL, Iraq — Bodies of dead Islamic State fighters still lay in the streets of west Mosul. Severed limbs from corpses were burnt, charred and strewn among the rubble of destroyed houses. The stench of death, a mixture of bodily waste and rotting flesh, mingled with the smell of garbage that hung in the air. The only way to cope with the nausea was to avoid deep breaths and take small sips of flavored sodium water from a plastic bottle that was melting in the broiling sun. But the stench was not the only thing the dead ISIS fighters left behind.

As Iraqi forces extend their control over the city, killing or chasing away remaining ISIS fighters, they encounter reminders of the regime imposed by the militant cleric Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who declared a new Islamic caliphate at the Great Mosque of al-Nuri. Meant to be a new era and empire, it has fallen in just three years. Al-Baghdadi himself has been reported killed, although his death has not been confirmed.

The ISIS fighters have continued to resist even after the battle was lost, rocking the city with explosions that shattered ancient structures and sent debris flying to land in heaps on the streets.

Iraqi forces listening in on ISIS radio transmissions heard signs of dissent and chaos in the ranks. The militants argued over which brigade had more men, who was most badly injured and whom they should leave behind. Their injuries went largely unattended and open to infection. They were weak, their morale low, and Iraqi forces knew they could take advantage of their weaknesses.

Wahlid, an Iraqi special-forces soldier, told me, “They’re fighting their hardest,” then he added, “but among themselves they have disputes.”

Radio used by Iraqi special forces to listen to ISISRadio used by Iraqi special forces to listen to ISIS

In a dimly lit room in a house near the front lines used as a base by Iraqi special forces, Wahlid told stories about listening to ISIS. The air conditioning was on full blast inside the house. He sat on a couch, drinking energy drinks and smoking cigarettes. An old walkie-talkie on an end table next to him crackled with voices chattering back and forth. An Iraqi commander shouted, “Get the Humvees out; find a safe place.” ISIS had coordinates for Iraqi soldiers in another neighborhood, and he was telling them to move before ISIS attacked.

Related slideshow: In Mosul, the war is never over, even when the shooting stops >>>

Wahlid laughed and with a smirk told what he considered a humorous story about an ISIS suicide bomber stranded in his explosive-filled car in the middle of the road. “The [Iraqi] soldiers shot at him,” Wahlid said. “His car broke down, he pressed the button and it didn’t work. So the militant who was in the car called on the radio back to the other [ISIS] militants, telling them, ‘The infidels broke down my car, but I can’t make it explode, I cannot blow it up because the button does not work. If you have any other way, brothers, blow it up, I want to blow up the car on the infidels.’”

Iraqi forces called for an airstrike. The car blew up.

ISIS fighters left behind a legacy of self-inflicted martyrdom, expecting rewards in heaven if they died fighting their alleged enemies. They saw themselves as heroes. The world did not agree.

Many came from other countries, tens of thousands of them who left behind a life they knew for a desert they didn’t know. Perhaps some of them left their homes for money, or a chance to be part of history. But the history they created is still desperate to leave them behind.

Many times, soldiers on the front lines admitted they couldn’t understand the ISIS fighters. They spoke different languages. Troops reported chatter in what they thought was Russian, Turkish and an Eastern language they couldn’t identify. One of the soldiers from the Najaf battalion, Rami, said that he was ethnically Turkmen and that sometimes he could understand the Turkish ISIS fighters.

The fighters also left behind their identities and documents. An Iraqi soldier said that while fighting at the front line, he noticed a woman in a black robe and hijab, a scarf around her head. He caught her eye. “I waved for her to run toward me,” he said.

He thought she was a civilian trying to escape. But when she moved along the wall in front of her house, he realized she was hiding an M-16 beneath her clothes. She realized she was exposed and fled. The soldier said she got away. He never said why he didn’t shoot.

But when he approached the house later, he found her identification. She had a German name on a German ID card. He also found a marriage certificate, issued by ISIS. She was married to a Russian fighter. What they left behind was a marriage that would never be recognized anywhere else. ISIS created its own system, its own contracts, records that are meaningless to a world that would never recognize the Islamic State.

ISIS had its own religious police, too, and “punishment officers,” who would correct or even arrest civilians who didn’t follow their rules and laws. One member of ISIS left his officer’s vest in the streets.

And when they fled, ISIS fighters left behind their weapons. Iraqi soldiers picked up weapons throughout the fight, some made in ISIS bomb factories, including mortars and rockets, and old Soviet-era rocket-propelled grenades that ISIS modified and improved. If the weapons were functional, Iraqis repurposed them and killed ISIS fighters with their own weapons. Wahlid demonstrated an RPG-7. “They have made some updates to it,” he said. “They’ve mixed the powder, and the wings [they added] will make it fly.”

Mortars left by ISISMortars left by ISIS

Some ISIS rebels weren’t killed by Iraqi forces or their own weapons but instead were caught and arrested. They were sent to intelligence battalions to be interrogated. At a small base on the outskirts of Mosul’s Old City, Iraqi intelligence officers allowed foreign journalists limited access to several suspects in custody. Bearded, with zip ties around their hands, the captured fighters were ushered back and forth between rooms. Some of the men’s eyes looked young, some old, but all seemed worn out and solemn. An intelligence officer pointed to one man and said he “knew” the man was ISIS because he had “confessed.”

But of all that ISIS left behind, most of all the armed group left Iraqi citizens grieving, even those who sympathized with the Sunni-linked fighters as a way to resist what they saw as an oppressive Shia-majority government. Even they had turned against ISIS, after three years of living under its governance.

The civilians who fled left behind everything they owned. They left behind loved ones whom they will never get to bury. They left photos of their mothers and fathers, taken in the days before the war and occupation.

Photos left behind in the Old City of Mosul, IraqPhotos left behind in the Old City of Mosul, Iraq

Shoes, scarves, T-shirts and dresses littered the streets. White flags still hung on the doors. Families believed that if they hung white cloth on their doors they might be safe. The Iraqi soldiers assured the people of Mosul that the white flags would signal they were on the government side and against ISIS. The civilians didn’t want to be arrested or questioned; they wanted to escape. But as the city grew more dangerous, the white flags were not enough to save them. A new order came down from the Iraqi forces: run.

So they ran. And they left their flags behind, hung from the ruins of their devastated city, once a thriving metropolis in the very cradle of civilization.

Ash Gallagher is a journalist covering the Mideast for Yahoo News.

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Read more from Yahoo News:

 

Source Article from https://www.yahoo.com/news/amid-rubble-mosul-bitter-memories-stench-death-164601312.html

Peter Jennings on 9/11: “Where did all the rubble go?”


rubble, wtc
New York City, NY, September 14, 2001 — Workers clear debris from the World Trade Center wreckage using frontloaders and cranes.

Photo by Andrea Booher/ FEMA News Photo (Matt Morgan/Flickr)

LOWER MANHATTAN (INTELLIHUB) — One day after the Twin Towers and Building 7 basically disintegrated into pillars of dust, leaving very little rubble behind, reporter George Stephanopoulos gave ABC News anchor Peter Jennings his explanation for the missing debris during a live newscast — an explanation that seemed irrational at the time.

For those readers that are unaware, pretty much nothing identifiable was recovered from the debris pile where the towers ‘collapsed,’ no office furniture, no desks, no computers — just fragments.

The trillion dollar question

“Where did all the rubble go?” The ABC anchor asked Stephanopoulos, who was reporting from on scene that day.

“The reason that there is so little rubble is that all of it simply fell down into the ground and was pulverized — evaporated,” Stephanopoulos said. Now, I should say though, for the last several hours there has been a steady stream of dump-trucks and other very large vehicles carrying out debris, including burned out hauls of cars […] police cars and others.”

The reporter’s explanation was that debris that fell from the tower simply disappeared. Something that is not even physically possible without the detonation of advanced nuclear munitions, such barometric bombs and demolition nukes (i.e. suitcase or backpack nukes.) In a strange way, Stephanopoulos answered Jennings correctly. The fact is, he just wasn’t privy to information that surfaced 15-years later in a report which I authored titled: “Secret barometric bomb technologies, nuclear technologies, used to bring WTC towers down: Proof” which explains how barometric bombs and micro-nukes were used to take down the towers.

Secret barometric bomb technologies, nuclear technologies, used to bring WTC towers down: Proof

Stephanopoulos also reported an “increased military presence” and said that National Guard troops, some of which were armed, from the 69th, 258th, 105th, and 42nd Divisions were conducting ‘crowd control and protection and recovery support’ operations.

During the rescue in the days and weeks following the attack, only a small number of bodies were ever recovered. However, small fragments of bodies, bone, and teeth, were found jettisoned, along with massive steel I-beam sections, hundreds of feet away onto neighboring rooftops and streets.

According to the NY Daily News, “Of the 2,750 people that reportedly died at the World Trade Center complex on 9/11, only 1,634 of them have been identified.

Via Intellihub

©2017. INTELLIHUB.COM. All Rights Reserved.

shepardShepard Ambellas is an opinion journalist, analyst, and the founder and editor-in-chief of Intellihub News & Politics (Intellihub.com). Shepard is also known for producing Shade: The Motion Picture (2013) and appearing on Travel Channel’s America Declassified (2013). Shepard is a regular contributor to Infowars. Read more from Shep’s World. Follow Shep on Facebook and Twitter.

Source Article from https://www.intellihub.com/peter-jennings-on-911-where-did-all-the-rubble-go/