Boost your body’s regenerative potential with these healing foods and nutrients

Image: Boost your body’s regenerative potential with these healing foods and nutrients

(Natural News) Whether you’re in the pink of health or suffering from medical conditions, it’s best to read up on these foods and nutrients that can help regenerate body tissues.

When we’re healthy, the body’s default state is that of ceaseless regeneration. However, when we’re sick, regenerative processes are overcome by degenerative ones. During times like this, medicine can help the body regain balance through foods, herbs, and nutrients. But drug-based medicine often uses chemicals that do not have any regenerative potential. They might even disrupt the body’s ability to self-renew to suppress the symptoms that they are supposed to address. (Related: Will scientists soon be able to regrow organs and injured tissue in patients?)

Here are six bodily tissues and the natural ways that can help your body initiate the regeneration process:

  1. Beta cell regeneration — Medical experts are still looking into the “diabetes-reversing potential” of natural compounds. Despite the funding that goes into “stem cell therapies, islet cell transplants, and an array of synthetic drugs in the developmental pipeline,” the cure for type-one diabetes could be right in our backyards or kitchens. In theory, the restoration of beta cells can help diabetics eliminate the need for insulin replacement. These compounds have experimentally helped reconstruct beta-cells that produce insulin and are destroyed in patients with diabetes: arginine, avocado, berberine (found in bitter herbs like goldenseal and barberry), bitter melon, chard, corn silk, curcumin, Gymenna Sylvestre/miracle fruit (“the sugar destroyer”), Nigella Sativa/fennel flower (“black cumin”), stevia, sulforaphane (which can be found in broccoli sprouts), and vitamin D.
  2. Cardiac cell regeneration — Various studies have proven that cardiac tissue can also regenerate. Researchers have even discovered a class of heart-tissue regenerating compounds called neocardiogenic substances. These substances help form cardiac progenitor cells, which turn into healthy heart tissue. Neocardiogenic substances include N-acetyl-cysteine, Geum Japonicum/Asian herb bennet, red wine extract, resveratrol, and Siberian ginseng/eleuthero root.
  3. Cartilage/joint/spine regeneration — Both curcumin and resveratrol can help improve recovery from spinal cord injury. Meanwhile, baicalin, Boswellia serrata, and curcumin extract are some of the potentially regenerative substances that can help address degenerative joint disease (i.e. osteoarthritis).
  4. Hormone regeneration — Vitamin C is one substance that can help manage hormone levels. The vitamin can contribute electrons to revive the form and function of estradiol/estrogen; E2), progesterone, and testosterone. If combined with foods that can help support the function of glands (e.g. the ovaries), vitamin C can soon replace or at least be an alternative to hormone replacement therapy.
  5. Nerve regeneration — A study from 2010, which was published in the journal Rejuvenation Research, revealed that combining blueberry, carnosine, and green tea produces neuritogenic (or promoting neuronal regeneration) and stem-cell regenerative effects in an animal model of neurodegenerative disease. Other researched neuritogenic substances include apigenin (a compound in vegetables like celery), ashwagandha, coffee (which contains trigonelline), curcumin, ginseng, huperzine, lion’s mane, mushroom, natto, red sage, resveratrol, royal jelly, and theanine. Remyelinating compounds, another class of nerve-healing substances, can help stimulate the restoration of the protective sheath around myelin (the axon of the neurons), which is usually damaged because of neurological injury and/or dysfunction, such as autoimmune and vaccine-induced demyelination disorders. Even therapeutic actions, such as listening to music or falling in love, can help improve your health and well-being. This proves that regenerative medicine does not always require the intake of food or drugs and that it can also incorporate various therapeutic actions.
  6. Liver regeneration — A compound in licorice called glycyrrhizin can help stimulate the regeneration of liver mass and function in the animal model of hepatectomy. Other substances that can stimulate liver regeneration include carvacrol (a compound found in oregano), curcumin, Korean ginseng, rooibos, and vitamin E.

Further study into regenerative medicine, along with cultivating attitudes, lifestyles, and proper diets that can boost bodily regeneration, will help us to attain bodily freedom that could soon lead to “the liberation of the human soul and spirit.”

You can read more articles about Chinese herbs and other natural cures at Healing.news.

Sources include:

GreenMedInfo.com

NCBI.NLM.NIH.gov

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/DaveHodges-TheCommonSenseShow/~3/e85ovLGdmBw/

The Ray: 18-mile stretch of road is a testbed for a "regenerative highway ecosystem"

What will the highways of the near future look like? This road project aims to create “a corridor that reconnects and restores us.”

One of the pioneers in corporate sustainability, Ray C. Anderson of Interface, not only led the change to a greener way of doing business during his lifetime, but his work also continues to inspire those looking to build a better world. He described his own environmental epiphany after reading Paul Hawken’s The Ecology of Commerce as a “spear in my heart, a life-changing moment,” when he realized he was “a plunderer” who no longer wanted to leave that legacy behind and who vowed to run his company “in a manner that takes from the earth only that which is naturally and rapidly renewable – not one fresh drop of oil – and to do no harm to the biosphere.”

Anderson passed on in 2011, but his legacy of green is still strong, and one of the small ways he was recognized was through the dedication of an 18-mile stretch of I-85 in Troup County, Georgia, in his honor. Although the irony of naming a stretch of interstate highway after Anderson doesn’t go unnoticed, this corridor, dubbed The Ray, is now a testbed and pilot project showcase for technologies and solutions that “will transform the transportation infrastructure of the future.”

Some of these are high-tech projects, such as a solar road and a solar-powered electric car charging station, but others are just plain commonsense, such as tire pressure sensors, farming the shoulders and right-of-way areas along the road with a perennial grain, planting pollinator gardens, and building bioswales to capture pollutants from roadway runoff and mitigate their effects on the local waterways.

The Ray bioswales© The Ray Bioswales

This is how Executive Director Allie Kelly describes the vision for The Ray:

One recent discovery that has come out of the research of The Ray is an innovative method of cutting down on road noise while also producing clean quiet renewable energy. The results of a study undertaken with UK innovation consultancy Innovia Technology found that noise barriers made with photovoltaic material (solar panels), which can convert sunlight into electricity, can be an effective way of stacking functionality. Conventional solar farms are optimized for solar gain, as they can present the panels at the best angle to the sun for maximum output, but they also have a large physical footprint, which can be an issue in crowded urban areas. Solar noise barriers, on the other hand, don’t take up a lot of horizontal area, but they are not likely to match the efficiency of conventional solar arrays. What they do have going for them is the fact that these noise-reducing barriers can do double duty.

As Harriet Langford, president and founder of The Ray, said, “By changing the decision on the front end about what kind of materials we use, we can unlock additional value. If you can mitigate noise pollution and produce renewable energy at the same time, why wouldn’t you?” The solar barriers project is still in its infancy, and The Ray will be host to prototypes of solar barriers in order to drill down to the most effective materials and construction method to use for them.

“In this research we found that selecting the right solar noise barrier technology for the right situation is critical. Important factors include the required noise reduction, road orientation, local insolation, and the local value of electricity. The aesthetics are also critical, and especially in urban settings, significant value is placed on a better looking barrier. Although bolting standard crystalline silicon panels onto a concrete barrier is cheap and functional, it is somewhat inelegant and wasteful of materials. Thin film solar technologies such as a-Si, CdTe, or perhaps in the future tunable bandgap perovskites integrate the solar panel into one elegant (and optionally transparent) noise-blocking pane of safety glass. With their cost declining and efficiency increasing, we may see more of these technologies on our highways in the future.” – Andy Milton, Innovia Technology

Learn more at The Ray.

Source Article from https://www.treehugger.com/cars/ray-18-mile-stretch-road-testbed-regenerative-highway-ecosystem.html

Beyond organic: How regenerative farming can save us from global catastrophe

A growing corps of organic, climate, environmental, social justice and peace activists are promoting a new world-changing paradigm that can potentially save us from global catastrophe. The name of this new paradigm and movement is regenerative agriculture, or more precisely regenerative food, farming and land use.

Regenerative agriculture and land use incorporates the traditional and indigenous best practices of organic farming, animal husbandry and environmental conservation. Regeneration puts a central focus on improving soil health and fertility (recarbonizing the soil), increasing biodiversity, and qualitatively enhancing forest health, animal welfare, food nutrition and rural (especially small farmer) prosperity.

The basic menu for a regeneration revolution is to unite the world’s 3 billion rural farmers, ranchers and herders with several billion health, environmental and justice-minded consumers to overturn “business as usual” and embark on a global campaign of cooperation, solidarity and regeneration.

According to food activist Vandana Shiva, “Regenerative agriculture provides answers to the soil crisis, the food crisis, the health crisis, the climate crisis and the crisis of democracy.”

So how can regenerative agriculture do all these things: increase soil fertility; maximize crop yields; draw down enough excess carbon from the atmosphere and sequester it in the soils, plants and trees to re-stabilize the climate and restore normal rainfall; increase soil water retention; make food more nutritious; reduce rural poverty; and begin to pacify the world’s hotspots of violence?

First, let’s look at what Michael Pollan, the U.S.’s most influential writer on food and farming, has to say about the miraculous regenerative power of Mother Nature and enhanced photosynthesis:

Consider what happens when the sun shines on a grass plant rooted in the earth. Using that light as a catalyst, the plant takes atmospheric CO2, splits off and releases the oxygen, and synthesizes liquid carbon–sugars, basically. Some of these sugars go to feed and build the aerial portions of the plant we can see, but a large percentage of this liquid carbon – somewhere between 20 and 40 percent – travels underground, leaking out of the roots and into the soil. The roots are feeding these sugars to the soil microbes – the bacteria and fungi that inhabit the rhizosphere – in exchange for which those microbes provide various services to the plant … Now, what had been atmospheric carbon (a problem) has become soil carbon, a solution – and not just to a single problem, but to a great many problems.

Besides taking large amounts of carbon out of the air – tons of it per acre when grasslands [or cropland] are properly managed … that process at the same time adds to the land’s fertility and its capacity to hold water. Which means more and better food for us…

This process of returning atmospheric carbon to the soil works even better when ruminants are added to the mix. Every time a calf or lamb shears a blade of grass, that plant, seeking to rebalance its “root-shoot ratio,” sheds some of its roots. These are then eaten by the worms, nematodes, and microbes – digested by the soil, in effect, and so added to its bank of carbon. This is how soil is created: from the bottom up … For thousands of years we grew food by depleting soil carbon and, in the last hundred or so, the carbon in fossil fuel as well. But now we know how to grow even more food while at the same time returning carbon and fertility and water to the soil.

A 2015 article in The Guardian summarizes some of the most important practices of regenerative agriculture:

Regenerative agriculture comprises an array of techniques that rebuild soil and, in the process, sequester carbon. Typically, it uses cover crops and perennials so that bare soil is never exposed, and grazes animals in ways that mimic animals in nature. It also offers ecological benefits far beyond carbon storage: it stops soil erosion, re-mineralizes soil, protects the purity of groundwater and reduces damaging pesticide and fertilizer runoff.

If you want to understand the basic science and biology of how regenerative agriculture can draw down enough excess carbon from the atmosphere over the next 25 years and store it in our soils and forests (in combination with a 100-percent reduction in fossil fuel emissions) to not only mitigate, but actually reverse global warming, read this article by one of North America’s leading organic farmers, Jack Kittridge.

If you want a general overview of news and articles on regenerative food, farming and land use, you can follow the newsfeed “Cook Organic Not the Planet” by the Organic Consumers Association and/or sign up for Organic Consumers Association’s weekly online newsletter (you can subscribe online or text “Bytes” to 97779).

You can also visit the Regeneration International website, where you’ll find this list of books on regenerative agriculture.

Solving the soil, health, environmental and climate crises

Without going into extensive detail here (you can read the references above), we need to connect the dots between our soil, public health, environment and climate crisis. As the widely-read Mercola newsletter puts it:

Virtually every growing environmental and health problem can be traced back to modern food production. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Food insecurity and malnutrition amid mounting food waste
  • Rising obesity and chronic disease rates despite growing health care outlays
  • Diminishing fresh water supplies
  • Toxic agricultural chemicals polluting air, soil and waterways, thereby threatening the entire food chain from top to bottom
  • Disruption of normal climate and rainfall patterns

Connecting the dots between climate and food

We can’t really solve the climate crisis (and the related soil, environmental, and public health crisis) without simultaneously solving the food and farming crisis. We need to stop putting greenhouse gas pollution into the atmosphere (by moving to 100-percent renewable energy), but we also need to move away from chemical-intensive, energy-intensive food, factory farming and land use, as soon as possible.

Regenerative food and farming has the potential to draw down a critical mass of carbon (200-250 billion tons) from the atmosphere over the next 25 years and store it in our soils and living plants, where it will increase soil fertility, food production and food quality (nutritional density), while re-stabilizing the climate.

The good news is that solar and wind power, and energy conservation are now cheaper than fossil fuels.

The heavy use of pesticides, GMOs, chemical fertilizers and factory-farming by 50 million industrial farmers (mainly in the Global North) is not just poisoning our health and engendering a global epidemic of chronic disease and malnutrition. It’s also destroying our soil, wetlands’ and forests’ natural ability to sequester excess atmospheric carbon into the Earth.

The good news is that solar and wind power, and energy conservation are now cheaper than fossil fuels. And most people are starting to understand that organic, grass-fed and freshly-prepared foods are safer and more nutritious than chemical and GMO foods.

The food movement and climate movements must break through our single-issue silos and start to work together. Either we stop Big Coal, Big Oil, fracking and the mega-pipelines, or climate change will soon morph into climate catastrophe, making it impossible to grow enough food to feed the planet. Every food activist needs to become a climate activist.

On the other hand, every climate activist needs to become a food activist. Our current system of industrial food, farming and land use, now degenerating 75 percent of all global farmland, is “mining” and decarbonizing the soil, destroying our forests and releasing 44-57 percent of all climate-destabilizing greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and black soot) into our already supersaturated atmosphere, while at the same time undermining our health with commoditized, overly processed food.

Solving the crisis of rural poverty, democracy and endless war

Out-of-touch and out-of-control governments of the world now take our tax money and spend $500 billion dollars a year mainly subsidizing 50 million industrial farmers to do the wrong thing. These farmers routinely over-till, over-graze (or under-graze), monocrop and pollute the soil and the environment with chemicals and GMOs to produce cheap commodities (corn, soy, wheat, rice, cotton) and cash crops, low-grade processed food and factory-farmed meat and animal products. Meanwhile 700 million small family farms and herders, comprising the 3 billion people who produce 70 percent of the world’s food on just 25 percent of the world’s acreage, struggle to make ends meet.

If governments can be convinced or forced by the power of the global grassroots to reduce and eventually cut off these $500 billion in annual subsidies to industrial agriculture and Big Food and instead encourage and reward family farmers and ranchers who improve soil health, biodiversity, animal health and food quality, we can simultaneously reduce global poverty, improve public health, and restore climate stability.

As even the Pentagon now admits, climate change, land degradation (erosion and desertification) and rural poverty are now primary driving forces of sectarian strife and war (and massive waves of refugees) in places like Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Yemen, Libya and Somalia. U.S. military intervention in these regions, under the guise of “regime change” or democratization, has only made things worse. This is why every peace activist needs to become a climate and food activist and vice-versa.

Similarly corrupt, out-of-control governments continue to subsidize fossil fuels to the tune of $5.3 trillion dollars a year, while spending more than $3 trillion dollars annually on weapons, mainly to prop up our global fossil fuel system and overseas empires. If the global grassroots can reach out to one another, bypassing our corrupt governments, and break down the geographic, linguistic and cultural walls that separate us, we can launch a global regeneration revolution – on the scale of the global campaign in World War II against the Nazis.

One thing we the grassroots share in all of the 200 nations of the world is this: We are sick and tired of corrupt governments and out-of-control corporations degenerating our lives and threatening our future. The Russian people are not our enemies, nor the Chinese, nor the Iranians. The hour is late. The crisis is dire. But we still have time to regenerate our soils, climate, health, economy, foreign policy and democracy. We still have time to turn things around.

The global regeneration movement we need will likely take several decades to reach critical mass and effectiveness. In spreading the regeneration message, and building this new movement at the global grassroots, we must take into account the fact that most regions, nations and people (and in fact many people who are still ignorant of the facts or climate change deniers) will respond more quickly or positively to different aspects or dimensions of our message (i.e. providing jobs; reducing rural and urban poverty and inequality, restoring soil fertility, saving the ocean and marine life, preserving forests, improving nutrition and public health, eliminating hunger and malnutrition, saving biodiversity, restoring animal health and food quality, preserving water, safeguarding Mother Nature or God’s Creation, creating a foundation for peace, democracy and reconciliation, etc.) rather than to the central life or death message: reversing global warming.

What is important is not that everyone, everywhere immediately agrees 100 percent on all of the specifics of regenerative food, farming and land use – for this is not practical – but rather that we build upon our shared concerns in each community, region, nation and continent. Through a diversity of messages, frames and campaigns, through connecting the dots between all the burning issues, we will find the strength, numbers, courage and compassion to build the largest grassroots coalition in history – to safeguard our common home, our survival and the survival of the future generations.

Tell President Trump to address food and agriculture in his climate action plans:



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Source Article from https://www.nationofchange.org/2017/06/05/beyond-organic-regenerative-farming-can-save-us-global-catastrophe/