New Report Highlights Ten American Species Our Children May Never See

Our children are less likely to see monarch butterflies, bumble bees, and a host of other once-common wildlife species due to farm pesticides, declining ocean health, climate change, and dirty energy production, according to a new report by the Endangered Species Coalition. The report, Vanishing: Ten American Species Our Children May Never See, highlights ten disappearing species and the causes of their dramatic population declines.

“This report calls attention to the fact that species are vanishing before our eyes,” said Cathy Liss, president of the Animal Welfare Institute, which nominated the little brown bat in partnership with Bat Conservation International and the Center for Biological Diversity. “By including this often-overlooked bat species, which despite its small size is of enormous ecological (and economic) value, the Endangered Species Coalition is building much-needed awareness that this animal is in grave danger of extinction.”

Little brown bats are in peril due to white-nose syndrome, a deadly fungus that has been decimating bat populations since it was first discovered in the United States in 2006. These bats, once common in North America, are now virtually extinct in their core Northeast range; up to 99 percent have died in affected areas. Weakened immune systems due to pesticide exposure and human disturbance in their caves are also factors in their demise.

As primary predators of night-flying insects that prey on agricultural crops, bats rank among humanity’s most valuable allies. An estimated 694 tons of insects—55.5 school buses’ worth—are alive today because bats have died of white-nosed syndrome. The report encourages people to build and install bat houses to help promote a healthy environment and provide shelter for this species in desperate need of safe habitats.

In addition to the little brown bat, the report features the mountain yellow-legged frog, monarch butterfly, North Pacific right whale, great white shark, rusty-patched bumblebee, greater sage-grouse, polar bear, Snake River sockeye salmon, and one plant species—the whitebark pine. All of the species chosen were nominated by Endangered Species Coalition member groups from across the country and reviewed by a committee of distinguished scientists for inclusion.

“With each passing day, our children are less and less likely to experience the full beauty of nature and see the kind of wildlife that baby boomers, Gen Xers, and even millennials experienced,” said Leda Huta, executive director of the Endangered Species Coalition. “We owe it to our future generations of Americans to protect our vanishing wildlife and the special places they call home.”

To learn more about the little brown bat and the other endangered species highlighted in the report, visit www.vanishingwildlife.org.

Source Article from http://www.nationofchange.org/new-report-highlights-ten-american-species-our-children-may-never-see-1411571858

New Report Highlights Ten American Species Our Children May Never See

Our children are less likely to see monarch butterflies, bumble bees, and a host of other once-common wildlife species due to farm pesticides, declining ocean health, climate change, and dirty energy production, according to a new report by the Endangered Species Coalition. The report, Vanishing: Ten American Species Our Children May Never See, highlights ten disappearing species and the causes of their dramatic population declines.

“This report calls attention to the fact that species are vanishing before our eyes,” said Cathy Liss, president of the Animal Welfare Institute, which nominated the little brown bat in partnership with Bat Conservation International and the Center for Biological Diversity. “By including this often-overlooked bat species, which despite its small size is of enormous ecological (and economic) value, the Endangered Species Coalition is building much-needed awareness that this animal is in grave danger of extinction.”

Little brown bats are in peril due to white-nose syndrome, a deadly fungus that has been decimating bat populations since it was first discovered in the United States in 2006. These bats, once common in North America, are now virtually extinct in their core Northeast range; up to 99 percent have died in affected areas. Weakened immune systems due to pesticide exposure and human disturbance in their caves are also factors in their demise.

As primary predators of night-flying insects that prey on agricultural crops, bats rank among humanity’s most valuable allies. An estimated 694 tons of insects—55.5 school buses’ worth—are alive today because bats have died of white-nosed syndrome. The report encourages people to build and install bat houses to help promote a healthy environment and provide shelter for this species in desperate need of safe habitats.

In addition to the little brown bat, the report features the mountain yellow-legged frog, monarch butterfly, North Pacific right whale, great white shark, rusty-patched bumblebee, greater sage-grouse, polar bear, Snake River sockeye salmon, and one plant species—the whitebark pine. All of the species chosen were nominated by Endangered Species Coalition member groups from across the country and reviewed by a committee of distinguished scientists for inclusion.

“With each passing day, our children are less and less likely to experience the full beauty of nature and see the kind of wildlife that baby boomers, Gen Xers, and even millennials experienced,” said Leda Huta, executive director of the Endangered Species Coalition. “We owe it to our future generations of Americans to protect our vanishing wildlife and the special places they call home.”

To learn more about the little brown bat and the other endangered species highlighted in the report, visit www.vanishingwildlife.org.

Source Article from http://www.nationofchange.org/new-report-highlights-ten-american-species-our-children-may-never-see-1411571858

Monarch Butterfly: U.S. Agency Pledges $20 Million For Conservation

A planed $20 million budget for monarch butterflies habitat restoration efforts over the next five years has been announced by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. Populations of the iconic Monarch butterfly hit an all-time low in the winter of 2013-2014, according to the Minnesota-based conservation group Monarch Joint Venture, with an estimated population of 33 million, down from the 1996-97 population of 1 billion monarchs.

Factors behind the decline in the butterfly’s population include a loss of their natural prairie habitat, and loss of the milkweed habitat needed to lay their eggs and for their caterpillars to eat.

The agency, Fish and Wildlife Director Dan Ashe said, has allocated $4 million a year over the next five years to support monarchs, in an effort to keep the species off the endangered species list.

Fish and Wildlife is working in collaboration with the Monarch Joint Venture, the National Wildlife Federation and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to restore and enhance over 200,000 acres of habitat for monarchs on public and private lands this year. In addition, they are supporting more than 750 schoolyard habitat projects and pollinator gardens nationwide.

The new funding will help USFWS to focus, with their partners, on conserving breeding and migration habitat in priority areas, such as spring breeding areas in Texas and Oklahoma, summer breeding habitat in Minnesota and other Midwest Corn Belt states, and areas west of the Rockies important for the western monarch population.

3,000 Mile Journey

Much of a monarch butterfly’s (Danaus plexippus) life is spent migrating between the U.S., Mexico, and Canada-a journey that for some individuals can cover over 3,000 miles. However, in recent years, this journey has become more dangerous and less successful for many because of deforestation, illegal logging, increased development, agricultural expansion, livestock raising, forest fires, and other threats to their migratory paths and summer and overwintering habitats.

“We can save the monarch butterfly in North America, but only if we act quickly and together,” said Ashe. “And that is why we are excited to be working with the National Wildlife Federation and National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to engage Americans everywhere, from schools and community groups to corporations and governments, in protecting and restoring habitat. Together we can create oases for monarchs in communities across the country.”

Original article by Denise Rosenfield for Reliawire

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Source Article from http://fracturedparadigm.com/2015/08/24/monarch-butterfly-u-s-agency-pledges-20-million-for-conservation/

New Report Highlights Ten American Species Our Children May Never See

Our children are less likely to see monarch butterflies, bumble bees, and a host of other once-common wildlife species due to farm pesticides, declining ocean health, climate change, and dirty energy production, according to a new report by the Endangered Species Coalition. The report, Vanishing: Ten American Species Our Children May Never See, highlights ten disappearing species and the causes of their dramatic population declines.

“This report calls attention to the fact that species are vanishing before our eyes,” said Cathy Liss, president of the Animal Welfare Institute, which nominated the little brown bat in partnership with Bat Conservation International and the Center for Biological Diversity. “By including this often-overlooked bat species, which despite its small size is of enormous ecological (and economic) value, the Endangered Species Coalition is building much-needed awareness that this animal is in grave danger of extinction.”

Little brown bats are in peril due to white-nose syndrome, a deadly fungus that has been decimating bat populations since it was first discovered in the United States in 2006. These bats, once common in North America, are now virtually extinct in their core Northeast range; up to 99 percent have died in affected areas. Weakened immune systems due to pesticide exposure and human disturbance in their caves are also factors in their demise.

As primary predators of night-flying insects that prey on agricultural crops, bats rank among humanity’s most valuable allies. An estimated 694 tons of insects—55.5 school buses’ worth—are alive today because bats have died of white-nosed syndrome. The report encourages people to build and install bat houses to help promote a healthy environment and provide shelter for this species in desperate need of safe habitats.

In addition to the little brown bat, the report features the mountain yellow-legged frog, monarch butterfly, North Pacific right whale, great white shark, rusty-patched bumblebee, greater sage-grouse, polar bear, Snake River sockeye salmon, and one plant species—the whitebark pine. All of the species chosen were nominated by Endangered Species Coalition member groups from across the country and reviewed by a committee of distinguished scientists for inclusion.

“With each passing day, our children are less and less likely to experience the full beauty of nature and see the kind of wildlife that baby boomers, Gen Xers, and even millennials experienced,” said Leda Huta, executive director of the Endangered Species Coalition. “We owe it to our future generations of Americans to protect our vanishing wildlife and the special places they call home.”

To learn more about the little brown bat and the other endangered species highlighted in the report, visit www.vanishingwildlife.org.

Source Article from http://www.nationofchange.org/new-report-highlights-ten-american-species-our-children-may-never-see-1411571858

New Report Highlights Ten American Species Our Children May Never See

Our children are less likely to see monarch butterflies, bumble bees, and a host of other once-common wildlife species due to farm pesticides, declining ocean health, climate change, and dirty energy production, according to a new report by the Endangered Species Coalition. The report, Vanishing: Ten American Species Our Children May Never See, highlights ten disappearing species and the causes of their dramatic population declines.

“This report calls attention to the fact that species are vanishing before our eyes,” said Cathy Liss, president of the Animal Welfare Institute, which nominated the little brown bat in partnership with Bat Conservation International and the Center for Biological Diversity. “By including this often-overlooked bat species, which despite its small size is of enormous ecological (and economic) value, the Endangered Species Coalition is building much-needed awareness that this animal is in grave danger of extinction.”

Little brown bats are in peril due to white-nose syndrome, a deadly fungus that has been decimating bat populations since it was first discovered in the United States in 2006. These bats, once common in North America, are now virtually extinct in their core Northeast range; up to 99 percent have died in affected areas. Weakened immune systems due to pesticide exposure and human disturbance in their caves are also factors in their demise.

As primary predators of night-flying insects that prey on agricultural crops, bats rank among humanity’s most valuable allies. An estimated 694 tons of insects—55.5 school buses’ worth—are alive today because bats have died of white-nosed syndrome. The report encourages people to build and install bat houses to help promote a healthy environment and provide shelter for this species in desperate need of safe habitats.

In addition to the little brown bat, the report features the mountain yellow-legged frog, monarch butterfly, North Pacific right whale, great white shark, rusty-patched bumblebee, greater sage-grouse, polar bear, Snake River sockeye salmon, and one plant species—the whitebark pine. All of the species chosen were nominated by Endangered Species Coalition member groups from across the country and reviewed by a committee of distinguished scientists for inclusion.

“With each passing day, our children are less and less likely to experience the full beauty of nature and see the kind of wildlife that baby boomers, Gen Xers, and even millennials experienced,” said Leda Huta, executive director of the Endangered Species Coalition. “We owe it to our future generations of Americans to protect our vanishing wildlife and the special places they call home.”

To learn more about the little brown bat and the other endangered species highlighted in the report, visit www.vanishingwildlife.org.

Source Article from http://www.nationofchange.org/new-report-highlights-ten-american-species-our-children-may-never-see-1411571858

New Report Highlights Ten American Species Our Children May Never See

Our children are less likely to see monarch butterflies, bumble bees, and a host of other once-common wildlife species due to farm pesticides, declining ocean health, climate change, and dirty energy production, according to a new report by the Endangered Species Coalition. The report, Vanishing: Ten American Species Our Children May Never See, highlights ten disappearing species and the causes of their dramatic population declines.

“This report calls attention to the fact that species are vanishing before our eyes,” said Cathy Liss, president of the Animal Welfare Institute, which nominated the little brown bat in partnership with Bat Conservation International and the Center for Biological Diversity. “By including this often-overlooked bat species, which despite its small size is of enormous ecological (and economic) value, the Endangered Species Coalition is building much-needed awareness that this animal is in grave danger of extinction.”

Little brown bats are in peril due to white-nose syndrome, a deadly fungus that has been decimating bat populations since it was first discovered in the United States in 2006. These bats, once common in North America, are now virtually extinct in their core Northeast range; up to 99 percent have died in affected areas. Weakened immune systems due to pesticide exposure and human disturbance in their caves are also factors in their demise.

As primary predators of night-flying insects that prey on agricultural crops, bats rank among humanity’s most valuable allies. An estimated 694 tons of insects—55.5 school buses’ worth—are alive today because bats have died of white-nosed syndrome. The report encourages people to build and install bat houses to help promote a healthy environment and provide shelter for this species in desperate need of safe habitats.

In addition to the little brown bat, the report features the mountain yellow-legged frog, monarch butterfly, North Pacific right whale, great white shark, rusty-patched bumblebee, greater sage-grouse, polar bear, Snake River sockeye salmon, and one plant species—the whitebark pine. All of the species chosen were nominated by Endangered Species Coalition member groups from across the country and reviewed by a committee of distinguished scientists for inclusion.

“With each passing day, our children are less and less likely to experience the full beauty of nature and see the kind of wildlife that baby boomers, Gen Xers, and even millennials experienced,” said Leda Huta, executive director of the Endangered Species Coalition. “We owe it to our future generations of Americans to protect our vanishing wildlife and the special places they call home.”

To learn more about the little brown bat and the other endangered species highlighted in the report, visit www.vanishingwildlife.org.

Source Article from http://www.nationofchange.org/new-report-highlights-ten-american-species-our-children-may-never-see-1411571858

New Report Highlights Ten American Species Our Children May Never See

Our children are less likely to see monarch butterflies, bumble bees, and a host of other once-common wildlife species due to farm pesticides, declining ocean health, climate change, and dirty energy production, according to a new report by the Endangered Species Coalition. The report, Vanishing: Ten American Species Our Children May Never See, highlights ten disappearing species and the causes of their dramatic population declines.

“This report calls attention to the fact that species are vanishing before our eyes,” said Cathy Liss, president of the Animal Welfare Institute, which nominated the little brown bat in partnership with Bat Conservation International and the Center for Biological Diversity. “By including this often-overlooked bat species, which despite its small size is of enormous ecological (and economic) value, the Endangered Species Coalition is building much-needed awareness that this animal is in grave danger of extinction.”

Little brown bats are in peril due to white-nose syndrome, a deadly fungus that has been decimating bat populations since it was first discovered in the United States in 2006. These bats, once common in North America, are now virtually extinct in their core Northeast range; up to 99 percent have died in affected areas. Weakened immune systems due to pesticide exposure and human disturbance in their caves are also factors in their demise.

As primary predators of night-flying insects that prey on agricultural crops, bats rank among humanity’s most valuable allies. An estimated 694 tons of insects—55.5 school buses’ worth—are alive today because bats have died of white-nosed syndrome. The report encourages people to build and install bat houses to help promote a healthy environment and provide shelter for this species in desperate need of safe habitats.

In addition to the little brown bat, the report features the mountain yellow-legged frog, monarch butterfly, North Pacific right whale, great white shark, rusty-patched bumblebee, greater sage-grouse, polar bear, Snake River sockeye salmon, and one plant species—the whitebark pine. All of the species chosen were nominated by Endangered Species Coalition member groups from across the country and reviewed by a committee of distinguished scientists for inclusion.

“With each passing day, our children are less and less likely to experience the full beauty of nature and see the kind of wildlife that baby boomers, Gen Xers, and even millennials experienced,” said Leda Huta, executive director of the Endangered Species Coalition. “We owe it to our future generations of Americans to protect our vanishing wildlife and the special places they call home.”

To learn more about the little brown bat and the other endangered species highlighted in the report, visit www.vanishingwildlife.org.

Source Article from http://www.nationofchange.org/new-report-highlights-ten-american-species-our-children-may-never-see-1411571858

New Report Highlights Ten American Species Our Children May Never See

Our children are less likely to see monarch butterflies, bumble bees, and a host of other once-common wildlife species due to farm pesticides, declining ocean health, climate change, and dirty energy production, according to a new report by the Endangered Species Coalition. The report, Vanishing: Ten American Species Our Children May Never See, highlights ten disappearing species and the causes of their dramatic population declines.

“This report calls attention to the fact that species are vanishing before our eyes,” said Cathy Liss, president of the Animal Welfare Institute, which nominated the little brown bat in partnership with Bat Conservation International and the Center for Biological Diversity. “By including this often-overlooked bat species, which despite its small size is of enormous ecological (and economic) value, the Endangered Species Coalition is building much-needed awareness that this animal is in grave danger of extinction.”

Little brown bats are in peril due to white-nose syndrome, a deadly fungus that has been decimating bat populations since it was first discovered in the United States in 2006. These bats, once common in North America, are now virtually extinct in their core Northeast range; up to 99 percent have died in affected areas. Weakened immune systems due to pesticide exposure and human disturbance in their caves are also factors in their demise.

As primary predators of night-flying insects that prey on agricultural crops, bats rank among humanity’s most valuable allies. An estimated 694 tons of insects—55.5 school buses’ worth—are alive today because bats have died of white-nosed syndrome. The report encourages people to build and install bat houses to help promote a healthy environment and provide shelter for this species in desperate need of safe habitats.

In addition to the little brown bat, the report features the mountain yellow-legged frog, monarch butterfly, North Pacific right whale, great white shark, rusty-patched bumblebee, greater sage-grouse, polar bear, Snake River sockeye salmon, and one plant species—the whitebark pine. All of the species chosen were nominated by Endangered Species Coalition member groups from across the country and reviewed by a committee of distinguished scientists for inclusion.

“With each passing day, our children are less and less likely to experience the full beauty of nature and see the kind of wildlife that baby boomers, Gen Xers, and even millennials experienced,” said Leda Huta, executive director of the Endangered Species Coalition. “We owe it to our future generations of Americans to protect our vanishing wildlife and the special places they call home.”

To learn more about the little brown bat and the other endangered species highlighted in the report, visit www.vanishingwildlife.org.

Source Article from http://www.nationofchange.org/new-report-highlights-ten-american-species-our-children-may-never-see-1411571858

New Report Highlights Ten American Species Our Children May Never See

Our children are less likely to see monarch butterflies, bumble bees, and a host of other once-common wildlife species due to farm pesticides, declining ocean health, climate change, and dirty energy production, according to a new report by the Endangered Species Coalition. The report, Vanishing: Ten American Species Our Children May Never See, highlights ten disappearing species and the causes of their dramatic population declines.

“This report calls attention to the fact that species are vanishing before our eyes,” said Cathy Liss, president of the Animal Welfare Institute, which nominated the little brown bat in partnership with Bat Conservation International and the Center for Biological Diversity. “By including this often-overlooked bat species, which despite its small size is of enormous ecological (and economic) value, the Endangered Species Coalition is building much-needed awareness that this animal is in grave danger of extinction.”

Little brown bats are in peril due to white-nose syndrome, a deadly fungus that has been decimating bat populations since it was first discovered in the United States in 2006. These bats, once common in North America, are now virtually extinct in their core Northeast range; up to 99 percent have died in affected areas. Weakened immune systems due to pesticide exposure and human disturbance in their caves are also factors in their demise.

As primary predators of night-flying insects that prey on agricultural crops, bats rank among humanity’s most valuable allies. An estimated 694 tons of insects—55.5 school buses’ worth—are alive today because bats have died of white-nosed syndrome. The report encourages people to build and install bat houses to help promote a healthy environment and provide shelter for this species in desperate need of safe habitats.

In addition to the little brown bat, the report features the mountain yellow-legged frog, monarch butterfly, North Pacific right whale, great white shark, rusty-patched bumblebee, greater sage-grouse, polar bear, Snake River sockeye salmon, and one plant species—the whitebark pine. All of the species chosen were nominated by Endangered Species Coalition member groups from across the country and reviewed by a committee of distinguished scientists for inclusion.

“With each passing day, our children are less and less likely to experience the full beauty of nature and see the kind of wildlife that baby boomers, Gen Xers, and even millennials experienced,” said Leda Huta, executive director of the Endangered Species Coalition. “We owe it to our future generations of Americans to protect our vanishing wildlife and the special places they call home.”

To learn more about the little brown bat and the other endangered species highlighted in the report, visit www.vanishingwildlife.org.

Source Article from http://www.nationofchange.org/new-report-highlights-ten-american-species-our-children-may-never-see-1411571858

New Report Highlights Ten American Species Our Children May Never See

Our children are less likely to see monarch butterflies, bumble bees, and a host of other once-common wildlife species due to farm pesticides, declining ocean health, climate change, and dirty energy production, according to a new report by the Endangered Species Coalition. The report, Vanishing: Ten American Species Our Children May Never See, highlights ten disappearing species and the causes of their dramatic population declines.

“This report calls attention to the fact that species are vanishing before our eyes,” said Cathy Liss, president of the Animal Welfare Institute, which nominated the little brown bat in partnership with Bat Conservation International and the Center for Biological Diversity. “By including this often-overlooked bat species, which despite its small size is of enormous ecological (and economic) value, the Endangered Species Coalition is building much-needed awareness that this animal is in grave danger of extinction.”

Little brown bats are in peril due to white-nose syndrome, a deadly fungus that has been decimating bat populations since it was first discovered in the United States in 2006. These bats, once common in North America, are now virtually extinct in their core Northeast range; up to 99 percent have died in affected areas. Weakened immune systems due to pesticide exposure and human disturbance in their caves are also factors in their demise.

As primary predators of night-flying insects that prey on agricultural crops, bats rank among humanity’s most valuable allies. An estimated 694 tons of insects—55.5 school buses’ worth—are alive today because bats have died of white-nosed syndrome. The report encourages people to build and install bat houses to help promote a healthy environment and provide shelter for this species in desperate need of safe habitats.

In addition to the little brown bat, the report features the mountain yellow-legged frog, monarch butterfly, North Pacific right whale, great white shark, rusty-patched bumblebee, greater sage-grouse, polar bear, Snake River sockeye salmon, and one plant species—the whitebark pine. All of the species chosen were nominated by Endangered Species Coalition member groups from across the country and reviewed by a committee of distinguished scientists for inclusion.

“With each passing day, our children are less and less likely to experience the full beauty of nature and see the kind of wildlife that baby boomers, Gen Xers, and even millennials experienced,” said Leda Huta, executive director of the Endangered Species Coalition. “We owe it to our future generations of Americans to protect our vanishing wildlife and the special places they call home.”

To learn more about the little brown bat and the other endangered species highlighted in the report, visit www.vanishingwildlife.org.

Source Article from http://www.nationofchange.org/new-report-highlights-ten-american-species-our-children-may-never-see-1411571858