Interview: ‘The Voice’ winner Brynn Cartelli on her favorite performances, important lessons and what to expect next

Season 14 of “The Voice” wrapped things up on Tuesday, May 22, crowning the youngest winner in the show’s history. Fourteen seemed to be a lucky number for Brynn Cartelli as that was also the age she was when she first auditioned to be on the hit NBC series. Now 15 and this season’s newest star, Cartelli has proven, alongside “Voice” coach Kelly Clarkson, her talent reaches far beyond her years – even Adam Levine would agree.

“Everyone in the Top 11 is like an older sibling to me. It’s intimidating but at the same time it’s such an honor that I get to start my career with something like ‘The Voice,’” Cartelli told AXS earlier in the season. On the heels of her win, we reunited with the young artist to catch up on all the latest.

AXS: What was the first thing that went through your head when you heard your name announced?

Brynn Cartelli: Man, when I first heard my name, I didn’t even believe it. I was in such shock, it was so crazy.

AXS: You’re the youngest winner ever, what does that mean to you?

BC: It’s incredible that my fans and everyone who supported me got me to the end. I’m so thankful for every single person that voted, that bought the song once; It’s been a wild ride.

AXS: Out of all of your performances this season, which was your favorite?

BC: I think my favorite performance that I did was probably “Fix You.” That’s where I got to connect with everyone. Because everyone’s gone through something; whether it’s been big and impactful on their life, or whether it’s something small that hurt them just a little bit, “Fix You” is really something anyone can understand and everyone can relate to. I think it’s such a beautiful song. I just love singing it. It was really emotional.

AXS: Was there a performance by another contestant that really wowed you this season?

BC: Oh, all of them.

AXS: Anything that really had your heart? Or a moment that really stood out to you?

BC: When Britton did “Good Lovin’” that was the coolest thing ever. I loved that.

AXS: What would you say being on a show like this has taught you?

BC: I walked in not really sure who I was as an artist, now I’m completely aware of where I want to go, what I want to do, how I want to sound and everything that I want. I feel so lucky to know this and I’m so excited for the future.

AXS: Getting to work with Kelly must have been incredible. What would you say were some of your fondest memories of working with her?

BC: She’s just so fun. If this was last week and we were in a rehearsal right now, even if I was exhausted, she’d be there supporting me. She’s so happy all the time and it’s so genuine. She’s real. She knows what she likes, she knows what she doesn’t like; she’s just such a cool person.

AXS: What do you think you’re going to miss most about your time on the show?

BC: One of the things I’m going to miss the most is living in the same hotel as a bunch of people who are ridiculously talented and speak the same language as me. You don’t find that anywhere else. I could walk up to anyone and start talking about music when they were all here; everyone cares about everyone. If you’re talking to actual musicians, it’s something different, it’s really special. I’m going to miss that a lot.

AXS: What advice can you offer other artists in the coming seasons?

BC: I feel like no matter where you are in your career, just go for it. I mean, I was in the beginning of my career. I just came in with a guitar and sang a little bit and they went, “cool.” I did not realize how much that would change things, but I’m so excited for it. Anyone who comes in needs to know they have an equal shot. Everyone’s there for a reason. At the end of the day, it’s one winner and everyone is putting their heart out there. It’s incredible to watch it all go down because everybody in the show is a family. It’s so special. If anyone is considering or on the fence, they should do it.

AXS: So, what’s your next move? What are you going to do first?

BC: I want to get home and get settled first. Then I have to finish out my school year. In the midst of that, Kelly and I have some really fun things planned for the summer. I just sent her a message about all these ideas I had for my own music. It makes me so excited.

AXS: What can fans expect to see from you in the future? Where do you hope to go?

BC: I want to make music for a really long time. I want to continue to change up what I do; because I love a lot of different genres. My main is dark pop/soul. I love that genre and I feel like I can do something in it. I have all these ideas and I love to write music. When I go home, I know I’m going to be writing a lot.

AXS: Do you have any dream collaborations you want to make happen?

BC: Yes. Tori Kelly, Allen Stone, JP Cooper; there’s a lot. I really want to sing with Coldplay now.

AXS: Is there anything you want to leave the readers who have been watching you and supporting you through this whole journey?

BC: I just want to say thank you to everyone. I’m so appreciative. Even though the show’s over, I want them to remember who I am and have my music – and get ready to buy it when it’s available, because I can’t wait to make it for them.

Source Article from https://m.axs.com/interview-the-voice-winner-brynn-cartelli-on-her-favorite-performances-130595

Interview: Singer Mike Aiken talks about sailing, new album ‘Wayward Troubadour’

With songs on his upcoming album Wayward Troubadour having titles like “Two Lane Highway” and “Travelin’ Bone,” you get the idea that the singer, songwriter and guitarist Mike Aiken does indeed know the nation’s highways and byways like the back of his hand. What you may not realize without a deeper dive into Aiken’s bio is that he’s as much of a sea dog as he is road dog, drawing inspiration not just from his experiences on dry land but also from countless hours spent on the water.

Wayward Troubadour is set to drop on June 8 and the album will please roots music fans who like old-style country music; the western swing of “Everything Changed,” the subdued wanderlust of “Nashville Skyline” and the breezy “A Little Lazy in Your Life” being perfect (and fiddle-enhanced) examples. We had a chance to chat with Aiken by email about his early influences, about drawing inspiration from the sea and where his sailboat might take him next. His commentary below is given exclusively to AXS.com.

AXS: You ran away as a kid to play music. Obviously, that has paid off now, but how did it work out for you at the time? Did you learn some hard lessons?

Mike Aiken: I learned some “street” lessons for sure. At one point I got picked up by the Chicago police for vagrancy and put in juvenile hall for a week. It didn’t help my guitar playing but increased my sense of adventure. It also gave me a lesson in observation of my surroundings that I’ve used both in traveling off the beaten path and in songwriting. You can say early training for a wayward troubadour.

AXS: We’re guessing that back in those days you didn’t have the deep knowledge of roots and country music that informs your music today. What type of music were you first playing, and when did you discover your talent for songwriting and storytelling?

MA: Story songs have always fascinated me and drawn me in. One of the earliest songs that drew me in was Roger Miller’s “King of the Road.” I don’t know where I heard it as a kid but the story captivated me and the “I have all the time in the world” laid-back way Roger sang it still gets to me. As for playing, I was all over the map, but “roots music,” (not that I understood what that was) was always a part. I would go from Doc Watson to Duane Allman, with Taj Mahal and Ry Cooder being big influences. They still are big influences. I hope I’m still discovering a talent for songwriting and storytelling. It’s something I’ve just always liked to do.

AXS: Your new album is called Wayward Troubadour, an appropriate title for a well-traveled musician. Is there a particular place or era that has most affected the musician that you are today?

MA: Well for me it’s been a desire, or need, to be on the move. My wife Amy and I have been living on sailboats for over 20-years and have put on over 30,000 open ocean miles. I’ve traveled by thumb, car, motorcycle, horseback, boat, bus and airplane. Touring has always felt like home. For me it’s a secure, comfort-spot; to be on the go. It doesn’t have to be fast but it is better if it’s moving. I’ve met wonderful people all over this beautiful planet so I would say, observing the world and the people in it has affected me the most.

AXS: How was your show at MerleFest? Did you treat the crowd to some of Wayward Troubadour, and did you get to hang out with or jam with any of the other performers?

MA: MerleFest was great! Yes, we brought out some tunes from Wayward Troubadour. We used MerleFest as an early kick-off of the record. We played at the Midnight Jam and brought out some other folks to play with us. Good times!

AXS: As you mentioned, you’re an accomplished sailor and the number of miles you’ve logged on the water are equivalent to a trip around the world and then some. Where have you sailed most recently and what is at the top of your list of ports that you’ve not yet visited?

MA: The music biz and the recording and releasing of Wayward Troubadour have kept us from doing any really long distance trips lately. As an example, to sail to Europe from the east coast of the US takes a month, assuming all goes well. That being said, we took a break and went to the Abacos in The Bahamas recently; crystal water and good diving reefs. I’m dying to sail to Cuba before it changes too much. Of course, the list is long of places to sail to.

AXS: Did you write or flesh out any of Wayward Troubadour on your boat? Do you sail with any bare-bones recording gear so you can capture your inspiration while away from home?

MA: The song “Chesapeake” was written while we were at anchor waiting out a fall cold front. We were heading from Norfolk, VA to Annapolis, MD. “Travelin’ Bone” was written while at anchor in Antigua and the idea for and first verse of “Hangover Helper” were written at the dock in Norfolk, VA the morning after a strong rum front blew through the night before. As for capturing inspiration, these days I use my phone to get the idea of a song. But in general, saltwater and electronics don’t get along.

Follow Mike Aiken here.

Source Article from https://m.axs.com/interview-singer-mike-aiken-talks-about-sailing-new-album-wayward-trou-130593

Interview: Finding inspiration with Ian Astbury of The Cult

It has always been difficult to categorize The Cult. This band has cemented themselves in rock history with their transcended combination of goth, metal and mysticism, completed by Ian Astbury’s brilliant vocals and anchored with Billy Duffy’s guitar riffs. Last year AXS had the opportunity to talk guitars in an interview with Billy Duffy, Friday we chatted with Ian Astbury about vocals.

AXS: The Cult is hitting the road with Stone Temple Pilots and Bush to create a tri-headlining Revolution 3 tour. What can fans expect? Any deep cuts to be brought into the set?

Ian Astbury: We are about to start rehearsals now, so we are about to get into all of that. Next week. We haven’t started to put together a setlist yet.

AXS: That has to be hard to put together.

I.A.: Haha, yeah…it always is. It always is. Certain songs you just can’t get rid of, although we have done tours without “She Sells Sanctuary” in the set. We are probably going to rotate the sets because we are playing at different times. The headliners are revolving on this tour. I really thought 2018 was going to be more of a writing year because we had been touring a lot the previous years.

AXS: Robert Plant once said he had one voice for the studio, one for a stadium and another for clubs. Do you find this as well?

I.A.: That is interesting. I feel that as songwriters we have evolved over the years to write songs for different environments. Perhaps the voice changes, the sentiments of what you are putting over. Robert is a master, one of the greatest singer-songwriters of all time. I would definitely bend to his wisdom.

AXS: Often after decades of use, singers blow out their vocal chords or the quality of their tone diminishes, yet you seem to have managed to retain your pipes quite well. What is your secret? Any advice for up and coming vocalists as far as a regimen goes?

I.A.: It is pretty basic, sleep. Water. Dehydration is the number one killer to voice so staying hydrated is really important. Living a lifestyle that respects the voice, especially on the road. The last few tours I got sick with bronchitis. We were in South America and I had bronchitis on the road, it was pretty rough. I was pretty much in bed or recuperating up until about a half hour before stage time. At that point, I just sort of flipped into dream mode.

AXS: You have to rally somehow.

I.A.: Exactly! That’s when hydration is real important. Hydration and diet. I am mindful of what I eat, like milk. Dairy is the enemy of singers. Well, it is for me. When you are young and rippin’ it up it is one thing, but then it isn’t really about quality of the voice then is it? It is about the performance. It is sort of a different band I guess then in a way. We are focused on putting a song over in the best possible way we can. Sometimes we cross over into a different space and the moment takes over. It is not always calculated. There is an element that comes to the show that is completely unexpected. A lot of times it is about the environment because that always changes. If we feel good in a room and it is ambient and acoustic there is the potential for magic. Where the audience is at obviously. You know, if you are working in the middle of winter and it is a Tuesday night, it is a big enough task for people to get to the show. Plus they are soaking wet. So we have to work extra hard those nights, but in the height of summer outdoors. I love playing outdoors. Like Red Rocks for example, it is magical on its own you don’t even have to put a band in there. The environment is there, it is just up to you to do the rest.

AXS: What continues to inspire you?

I.A.: Well as we travel we have new experiences. Going to new environments kind of shakes off your domestic situation. While traveling you are allowed to open up to new experiences. Travel is a very important part of it. I am not great on social media. I know a lot of people that are but I don’t do a lot of it. I do really enjoy looking at what people are looking at and observing. For the most part, it is just experiences. I have my own experiences, it is the only thing I really know. I can only write what I know.

AXS: Have you and Billy been doing any writing?

I.A.: Over the past six months we have been kind of going our separate ways and getting back into our lives. The past couple of years have taken up a lot. There were a few albums and quite a bit of touring, which is about right for The Cult. We both go away for a while and work on our own things. Then we meet at some point and share ideas that we’ve got. See if we want to continue making another album. I don’t know, albums are really interesting now. It is a very different time for releasing music. We will see. We are not tied to any label right now so we can pretty much do anything we want.

AXS: The Cult have revisited albums for tours in the past. 2009 was Love and in 2013 Electric. A lot of the fans are dreaming of a Sonic Temple tour. Next year is 30 years since its release. Any thoughts for a Sonic tour?

I.A.: I don’t know, we will see. I’d love to see how the summer rolls. When it comes to setlists it is really what we just naturally gravitate towards. With Love and Electric, playing those albums in 2009 and 2013 just kind of felt right. With each of them we had made and album and then toured and then made an album and then toured. There was a cycle we had been in for about 8 years, playing an iconic record we had already recorded. So we will see. You know though that The Cult never celebrate anniversaries. I always thought that was an industry devise to sell records or whatever. Some label came up with that idea. 10th anniversaries, 20th anniversaries. How about people just put out a good record right now.

Visit The Cult webpage for more information on the band. Follow The Cult on Facebook and Twitter to stay up-to-date on all band happenings. The Cult will be performing at Red Rocks Amphitheatre in Morrison, CO on August 19, 2018, purchase AXS tickets here.

Source Article from https://m.axs.com/interview-finding-inspiration-with-ian-astbury-of-the-cult-130456

Interview: spaceprodigi talks making festival debut at EDC Las Vegas’ kineticFIELD

Her name is about to be on the lips of everyone attending EDC Las Vegas this weekend. Who might this be? Mack Bartsch, better known as spaceprodigi, will take the stage at kineticFIELD on day 3 at 7 p.m. to mesmerize the crowd with her analog synth and her blended beats.

EDC’s kineticFIELD is quite an accomplishment for any DJ, a highlight for a career. For spaceprodigi, who is a mere 17 years of age, it will serve as her debut on the festival scene. Talk about one way to start a career! She’s simply astounding and her sound will mesmerize and move people this coming weekend. 

AXS had the opportunity to catch up with the wunderkind before EDC gets underway. She shares her excitement, passions and influences that have helped get her to this place. 

AXS: At 17 you’re bursting on the scene with a great stage name and sound. How did you go about choosing your name?​​

spaceprodigi: I have always been a huge roller coaster enthusiast, but ever since I was about 6 years old, I’ve had a major obsession with the classic coaster at Disney World, Space Mountain. At that age, the look of the massive spaceship structure of the building, the sound of the pretty on-ride synth music, and the darkness all intrigued me; it really felt like you were in freaking outer space! I knew every fact about that ride and have ridden it at least 100 times since then. So, when I was 13 and started producing electronic music, I was trying to figure out what I wanted my name to be and so I told my mom “What about spaceprodigi?” 

AXS: It’s a great name that catches the ear, especially when your debut festival show is at EDC. You’re 17 and tapped to play kineticFIELD this year. Take us through all the emotions and excitement from beginning to end when you first heard.

s: When I first heard I was playing on Kinetic, I freaked out! I was like, “Oh my gosh, I get to play in front of a big crowd!” I was shocked, scared and excited at the same time and I wouldn’t have ever dreamed that I would be playing on one of the biggest stages of electronic dance music for my first festival.

AXS: How have you gone about preparing for this year’s set and in what ways does the crowd play a part in the formation of that set as you play before them?

s: Well, since this is my first real show, I’ve spent the last few months making a lot of new music and working on my live show setup. 

I’ve been crafting a live set that is full of energy as well as emotions so that the crowd can really feel what I’m feeling when I make the music. So, I want to show my versatility by including tracks ranging from energetic bangers to more chilled out trance vibes. My show setup is a little different; I use Ableton on my laptop, which sends stems of my music to my Pioneer mixer, then I can manipulate those stems with my FX units. The setup offers a lot of flexibility and eventually I will add a few live analog synths to the show.

AXS: You’ve already done so much…podcasting, producing, teaching. How do you do it all and what aspect do you like the best?

s: Producing, mixing, and mastering music with analog gear is very time consuming, and that’s my only focus right now. So, I’ve made a lot of changes in my life to produce music; I recently switched over to online schooling at UT High School, which allows me to complete my school in less time with more flexibility. I spend the majority of my day locked up in my studio.

AXS: Who are some of the biggest influences on your music, and how are you continuing to develop that music as you grow? How do events like EDC and other festivals become formative in that shaping? 

s: My biggest influence is deadmau5, who is the reason why I started producing electronic music. Joel (deadmau5) has inspired me to create using analog synths as well as taking the time to learn how to mix and master my music with hardware gear. Other big influences are Eric Prydz, Tiësto, Martin Garrix, Zedd, Daft Punk and some rock bands such as Depeche Mode, Nine Inch Nails, My Chemical Romance and Blink-182. As for my music, I’ve been continuing to develop my own sound, which is a combo of edgy, energy and pretty.

AXS: What’s next for you? Are you working full time in music, going to school or focusing on developing your skills as a producer?

s: I’m working on producing more music, getting it released, and finding the perfect label for me. Also, I won’t be going to school and plan on continuing on doing more shows and festivals while I grow as an artist. My dream is to have my own live show and tour, as well as being a headliner of major festivals.

 

Make sure to catch spaceprodigi this weekend on Day 3 of EDC Las Vegas at kineticFIELD, 7 p.m. In the meanwhile, watch as she works her synth and take a listen to her SoundCloud channel. 

Source Article from https://m.axs.com/interview-spaceprodigi-talks-making-festival-debut-at-edc-las-vegas-ki-130418

Rare Nikola Tesla Interview From 1931 About What Extraterrestrial Communication Would Do To Mankind

Nikola Tesla was one of the greatest scientific minds our world has ever known. Although mysteriously absent from school textbooks, he accomplished much in his lifetime, discovering radio and remote control — the backbone of NASA’s current technology — drone technology, cosmic radio waves, and more. He was also a big proponent of free, unlimited energy for everyone.

Tesla publicly demonstrated his first working model of a robot guided by radio waves, unveiled to many astonished viewers at the Electrical Exposition held at Madison Square Garden, in May 1898. This was front page news in America at that time. It marked the first time that radio waves were used to guide the movement of a robot — 11 years before Marconi was awarded the Nobel Prize for the discovery of radio in 1909.

In today’s world of science, few remember that most of our pioneering physicists and chemists were mystics. Certainly this is the case for Tesla, whose idea of free energy was greatly influenced by Vedic philosophy. It is an unfortunate reality that even someone as brilliant as Tesla would be maligned as a pseudoscientist by mainstream researchers if he were alive and working today.

Tesla wasn’t just a proponent of wireless communication and energy. He also believed we are not alone in the universe — a conclusion which has become blatantly obvious, even to many mainstream scientists. In fact, a recent congressional hearing in the United States saw top U.S. astronomers tell Congress that extraterrestrial life most certainly exists, without question. And a number of scientists and military and political personnel have told us that we are not alone, and that we have been being visited by intelligent extraterrestrial life for a long time.

Tesla offered these remarks in an interview he gave to Time at the age of 75:

I think that nothing can be more important than interplanetary communication. It will certainly come someday, and the certitude that there are other human beings in the universe, working, suffering, struggling, like ourselves, will produce a magic effect on mankind and will form the foundation of a universal brotherhood that will last as long as humanity itself.

Few people know that in 1899, while working at his Colorado Springs laboratory, he announced that he had received extraterrestrial radio signals. The scientific community thought he was nuts, and in fact, cosmic radio signals didn’t even exist at the time. One an easily imagine how alone and misunderstood Tesla must have felt.

The Black Knight Satellite

It’s known as the “Black Knight Satellite,” and although it wasn’t confirmed by scientists until 1932, Tesla discovered it in 1899 while in his Colorado Springs laboratory, hearing strange rhythmic sounds on his radio receiver. The confirmation in 1932 gave birth to the field of radio astronomy, which is now used to decode and detect messages from distant stars and other mysterious celestial sources. Tesla writes:

I can never forget the first sensations I experienced when it dawned upon me that I had observed something possibly of incalculable consequences to mankind. I felt as though I were present at the birth of a new knowledge or the revelation of a great truth. Even now, at times, I can vividly recall the incident, and see my apparatus as though it were actually before me. My first observations positively terrified me, as there was present in them something mysterious, not to say supernatural, and I was alone in my laboratory at night; but at that time the idea of these disturbances being intelligently controlled signals did not yet present itself to me.

The changes I noted were taking place periodically, and with such a clear suggestion of number and order that they were not traceable to any cause then known to me. I was familiar, of course, with such electrical disturbances as are produced by the sun, Aurora Borealis and earth currents, and I was as sure as I could be of any fact that these variations were due to none of these causes. The nature of my experiments precluded the possibility of the changes being produced by atmospheric disturbances, as has been rashly asserted by some. It was some time afterward when the thought flashed upon my mind that the disturbances I had observed might be due to an intelligent control. Although I could not decipher their meaning, it was impossible for me to think of them as having been entirely accidental. The feeling is constantly growing on me that I had been the first to hear the greeting of one planet to another. . . . I was not merely beholding a vision, but had caught sight of a great and profound truth. (source)(source)

Tesla believed that the signals he was picking up on were from Mars.  Here’s another statement he gave on what he found:

Others may scoff at this suggestion…[of] communicating with one of our heavenly neighbors, as Mars…or treat it as a practical joke, but I have been in deep earnest about it every since I made my first observations in Colorado Springs… At the time, there existed no wireless plant other than mine that could produce a disturbance perceptible in a radius of more than a few miles. Furthermore, the conditions under which I operated were ideal, and I was well trained for the work. The character of the disturbances recorded precluded the possibility of their being of terrestrial origin, and I also eliminated the influence of the sun, moon, and Venus. As I then announced, the signals consisted in a regular repetition of numbers, and subsequent study convinced me that they must have emanated from Mars, the planet having just then been close to the earth. (source)

According to the American Physical Society Physics, Tesla concluded that these signals, or this strange unnatural object they originate from, was indeed extraterrestrial, or an effort to “communicate with Earth by alien beings.”

This was one of multiple incidents in which Telsa intercepted what he thought were intelligent signals from space. He states that even the simplest form of communication (such as the interchange of numbers) could represent a form of intelligible transmission from extraterrestrials.

When I came across that information, I instantly thought about this NSA document, which is one example of strange messages that come from space, as elaborated on below.

Today, we know for sure that these signals are of extraterrestrial origin, but it’s assumed that they are radio waves from planets, comets, stars, or galaxies — not ‘ET.’

More than 30 years after the confirmation in 1932, a graduate student by the name of Jocelyn Bell noticed some strange data coming from her telescope at the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory (MRAO). After a few weeks, she noticed that the signal being produced could not have originated from any known natural source, and she (and her team) ruled out every conceivable explanation, such as multiple sources of human interference, other radio astronomers, radar reflected off the moon, orbiting satellites, television signals, and more. Nothing could explain these strange signals.

She eventually published a paper in the scientific journal Nature, despite the fact that the source of the sound, though they knew it to be artificial, had not been determined.

These announcements caused quite a commotion at the time, and today it is common for strange signals, determined to be coming from ‘non-natural’ sources, to be detected. But who knows what they are?

Just last year, strange radio wave flashes from far outside of our Milky Way galaxy (or in it) had scientists completely confused.

I just want to make it clear that this type of stuff is always going on.

Sources Used:

aps.org/publications

tfcbooks

collective-evolution

Source Article from https://worldtruth.tv/a-rare-nikola-tesla-interview-from-1931-about-what-extraterrestrial-communication-would-do-to-mankind/

A Rare Nikola Tesla Interview From 1931 About What Extraterrestrial Communication Would Do To Mankind



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Nikola Tesla was one of the greatest scientific minds our world has ever known. Although mysteriously absent from school textbooks, he accomplished much in his lifetime, discovering radio and remote control — the backbone of NASA’s current technology — drone technology, cosmic radio waves, and more. He was also a big proponent of free, unlimited energy for everyone.

Tesla publicly demonstrated his first working model of a robot guided by radio waves, unveiled to many astonished viewers at the Electrical Exposition held at Madison Square Garden, in May 1898. This was front page news in America at that time. It marked the first time that radio waves were used to guide the movement of a robot — 11 years before Marconi was awarded the Nobel Prize for the discovery of radio in 1909.

In today’s world of science, few remember that most of our pioneering physicists and chemists were mystics. Certainly this is the case for Tesla, whose idea of free energy was greatly influenced by Vedic philosophy. It is an unfortunate reality that even someone as brilliant as Tesla would be maligned as a pseudoscientist by mainstream researchers if he were alive and working today.

Tesla wasn’t just a proponent of wireless communication and energy. He also believed we are not alone in the universe — a conclusion which has become blatantly obvious, even to many mainstream scientists. In fact, a recent congressional hearing in the United States saw top U.S. astronomers tell Congress that extraterrestrial life most certainly exists, without question. And a number of scientists and military and political personnel have told us that we are not alone, and that we have been being visited by intelligent extraterrestrial life for a long time.

Tesla offered these remarks in an interview he gave to Time at the age of 75:

I think that nothing can be more important than interplanetary communication. It will certainly come someday, and the certitude that there are other human beings in the universe, working, suffering, struggling, like ourselves, will produce a magic effect on mankind and will form the foundation of a universal brotherhood that will last as long as humanity itself.

Few people know that in 1899, while working at his Colorado Springs laboratory, he announced that he had received extraterrestrial radio signals. The scientific community thought he was nuts, and in fact, cosmic radio signals didn’t even exist at the time. One an easily imagine how alone and misunderstood Tesla must have felt.

The Black Knight Satellite

It’s known as the “Black Knight Satellite,” and although it wasn’t confirmed by scientists until 1932, Tesla discovered it in 1899 while in his Colorado Springs laboratory, hearing strange rhythmic sounds on his radio receiver. The confirmation in 1932 gave birth to the field of radio astronomy, which is now used to decode and detect messages from distant stars and other mysterious celestial sources. Tesla writes:

I can never forget the first sensations I experienced when it dawned upon me that I had observed something possibly of incalculable consequences to mankind. I felt as though I were present at the birth of a new knowledge or the revelation of a great truth. Even now, at times, I can vividly recall the incident, and see my apparatus as though it were actually before me. My first observations positively terrified me, as there was present in them something mysterious, not to say supernatural, and I was alone in my laboratory at night; but at that time the idea of these disturbances being intelligently controlled signals did not yet present itself to me.

The changes I noted were taking place periodically, and with such a clear suggestion of number and order that they were not traceable to any cause then known to me. I was familiar, of course, with such electrical disturbances as are produced by the sun, Aurora Borealis and earth currents, and I was as sure as I could be of any fact that these variations were due to none of these causes. The nature of my experiments precluded the possibility of the changes being produced by atmospheric disturbances, as has been rashly asserted by some. It was some time afterward when the thought flashed upon my mind that the disturbances I had observed might be due to an intelligent control. Although I could not decipher their meaning, it was impossible for me to think of them as having been entirely accidental. The feeling is constantly growing on me that I had been the first to hear the greeting of one planet to another. . . . I was not merely beholding a vision, but had caught sight of a great and profound truth. (source)(source)

Tesla believed that the signals he was picking up on were from Mars.  Here’s another statement he gave on what he found:

Others may scoff at this suggestion…[of] communicat[ing] with one of our heavenly neighbors, as Mars…or treat it as a practical joke, but I have been in deep earnest about it every since I made my first observations in Colorado Springs… At the time, there existed no wireless plant other than mine that could produce a disturbance perceptible in a radius of more than a few miles. Furthermore, the conditions under which I operated were ideal, and I was well trained for the work. The character of the disturbances recorded precluded the possibility of their being of terrestrial origin, and I also eliminated the influence of the sun, moon, and Venus. As I then announced, the signals consisted in a regular repetition of numbers, and subsequent study convinced me that they must have emanated from Mars, the planet having just then been close to the earth. (source)

According to the American Physical Society Physics, Tesla concluded that these signals, or this strange unnatural object they originate from, was indeed extraterrestrial, or an effort to “communicate with Earth by alien beings.”

This was one of multiple incidents in which Telsa intercepted what he thought were intelligent signals from space. He states that even the simplest form of communication (such as the interchange of numbers) could represent a form of intelligible transmission from extraterrestrials.

When I came across that information, I instantly thought about this NSA document, which is one example of strange messages that come from space, as elaborated on below.

Today, we know for sure that these signals are of extraterrestrial origin, but it’s assumed that they are radio waves from planets, comets, stars, or galaxies — not ‘ET.’

More than 30 years after the confirmation in 1932, a graduate student by the name of Jocelyn Bell noticed some strange data coming from her telescope at the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory (MRAO). After a few weeks, she noticed that the signal being produced could not have originated from any known natural source, and she (and her team) ruled out every conceivable explanation, such as multiple sources of human interference, other radio astronomers, radar reflected off the moon, orbiting satellites, television signals, and more. Nothing could explain these strange signals.

She eventually published a paper in the scientific journal Nature, despite the fact that the source of the sound, though they knew it to be artificial, had not been determined.

These announcements caused quite a commotion at the time, and today it is common for strange signals, determined to be coming from ‘non-natural’ sources, to be detected. But who knows what they are?

Just last year, strange radio wave flashes from far outside of our Milky Way galaxy (or in it) had scientists completely confused; you can read more about that here.

I just want to make it clear that this type of stuff is always going on.

Sources Used:

http://www.aps.org/publications/capitolhillquarterly/200604/history.cfm

http://www.tfcbooks.com/tesla/1901-02-09.htm

All other sources are listed throughout the article.


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Interview: Country outlaw goes metal with DevilDriver’s Dez Fafara

Every once in awhile, someone in music will put something together that’s simply explosive – something out of the ordinary that makes fans of all genres and all walks of life just lean back and go ‘woah!’ And groove metal’s DevilDriver has just put one of those projects together – only X 10. 

Titled Outlaws ‘Til The End: Vol. 1 the highly anticipated upcoming full-length album will feature classic outlaw country-gone-metal anthems with an array of stellar guest musicians like Hank Williams III or “Hank 3,” Lamb of God’s Randy Blythe and Mark Morton, Lee Ving from Fear, John Carter Cash and Ana Cristina Cash,  Brock Lindow of 36 CrazyfistsBurton C. Bell of Fear Factory and more. Some of the highlights of this collection are the Johnny Paycheck tune “I’m the Only Hell (Mama Ever Raised),” “If Drinking Don’t Kill Me (Her Memory Will)” originally recorded by George Jones, the Johnny Cash anthem “The Man Comes Around,” just to name a few – only like you’ve never heard them before.

AXS had the opportunity to talk to DevilDriver vocalist, Dez Fafara, about this larger-than-life album, the power of music, and how he loves collaborating with other artists – check it out…

AXS: You’ve got your Outlaws ‘Til The End: Vol. 1. album coming out in July – is it true that it was actually a photo that DevilDriver took as cowboys that inspired this project in the first place?

Dez Fafara: Yeah, two photo shoots – there was a picture that was in Revolver [Magazine] that Hank 3 and I did for Rebel Meets Rebel when I interviewed him years back, it’s hanging in my house. And then on an off-day [DevilDriver] hit one of those Mall of America things after a big meal, we all went and got our picture taken with all of us looking like cowboys. And I sat and looked at that thing for like two weeks in the back of the bus as we were touring and it just hit me one day – metal bands have covered it all. Punk rock has been done, 80s songs have been done, and I love when bands cover songs. So I said let’s do something that really hasn’t been done – and to the point of bringing in guests and actually bringing in country people, punk people, metal people, and do something like this. And it took about two years and it was a hell of a lot of chew off, but nothing in life that comes easy is worth it, right? So that’s really it right there.

AXS: What was interesting in hearing you and a lot of the other guys talk about this, is that most of you were introduced to country at a young age, usually by parents or grandparents –  I was too. But then we all kind of fell away from it and immersed ourselves in metal, but then later on in life somehow find your way back to those country classics again.

DF: Right. It’s that thing where you’re old enough, I guess, to have been exposed to your parent’s record collection. (laughs) Now, I have three sons but they’d have to be like, ‘Let me borrow your phone or iPod’ to hear the music I’m listening to. We got unintentionally turned on to different genres because of our parent’s and grandparent’s record collections. I’ve been turned on to lots of genres in my life, I’ve never been a purist, and I have more in common with Dollhouse than I do Black Sabbath, and more in common with Black Flag than I do with whatever other metal band. And my love for outlaw country comes from the realness and the poignant lyrics – there’s something about the realness of those stories that just cuts right through you. And heavy metal just loves a good poignant lyric so to be able to inject this outlaw spirit it just seemed right.

AXS: So is there a particular song on this collection that just really hits you, lyrically?

DF: Well, every one of these hits, and we narrowed it down from 100. (laughs) So every one of these was on the top of my life. But a song like “The Ride” by Hank [Williams] Senior, hearing Lee [Ving], who is my all-time punk rock hero, on that song is incredible. Every one of these lyrics feels personal to me even though we didn’t write the songs. And I don’t drink anymore, I’m sober, but when I used to drink these were the songs that were going on at four in the morning in the back of my tour bus.

AXS: One thing that seems to happen creatively when an artist tries something new is that they learn something new about themselves. Did this project spark that kind of epiphany for you in any way?

DF: Well, one of the reasons I did this project was because back in the 70s everyone used to jam together – get on stage together and jam. But I was a young kid so I wasn’t there, but there was a comradery between musicians – like Zeppelin was down front watching Rolling Stones that night, or whatever. So I wanted some kind of comradery right now in music. If I found anything special within myself it’s that I love to collaborate, I found out that collaboration is the essence of art. I wasn’t by myself I was collaborating with all these great artists from Hank 3 to John Carter Cash and Ana Cash. I’m recording with Lee Ving, I’m working with Randy from Lamb of God. And that’s why we slapped ‘volume 1’ on it, in case a volume two happens – and crazy enough I’ve gotten so many calls, ‘Why didn’t you call me?’ and ‘I would have loved to do this song or that song…’ So there’s a lot of that going on. And I found out that I love collaboration, and I love doing something different that is going to shake up what we’re doing right now. And this record is something that’s going to be played every Saturday at barbeques.

AXS: Another thing that’s cool about this project is that it might open up the minds of some people out there who are only into one genre and don’t give others a chance.

DF: Yeah, I’m not a purist and I never have been. One of my favorite things is to kick sand in the face of the purist. I did that with Coal Chamber – we were an amalgamation of so many things and we had more in common with Sisters of Mercy than with metal. (laughs) But I think there are kids out there who wear their leather jackets and talk about death metal but they go home and listen to other stuff too. If I can’t go from Black Sabbath to Siouxsie and the Banshees to Johnny Cash then f**king leave my house! (laughs) This is all music here and I love all other music. Music crosses so many boundaries you just need to open yourself up. It’s an open forum – you should embrace it in all forms and fall in love with it.

AXS: Is there anything else you’d like to mention?

DF: Well, the record is coming out July 6th and I am beyond humbled and appreciative of every one of guests that are on this thing. I just hope that people really enjoy this record. And hit me up on Instagram and DevilDriver on our Facebook page and website, and come say hello.

Upcoming DevilDriver performances:

July 12 – Oshkosh, WI – Rock USA
July 15 – Mansfield, OH – The World-Famous Historic Ohio State Reformatory, Home of the “Shawshank Prison” – INKCARCERATION Music and Tattoo Festival

Source Article from https://m.axs.com/interview-country-outlaw-goes-metal-with-devildriver-s-dez-fafara-130096

Interview: Grammy-nominated drummer Steve Gadd releases new album and heads back out on tour with James Taylor

James Taylor commented with the following upon listening to Steve Gadd Band’s new album. “These fellows make up the better part of my musical life. Together we make a traveling community. It’s been that way for half of my days. Long may it remain so. Each of these guys individually is a creative force with his own prodigious body of work; each is recognized throughout the musical world as a master of his own ax. Together they are even more than the sum of their parts. When they release a new batch of fresh tunes it is a gift, to be sure, and a cause for celebration.”

Grammy-nominated drummer Steve Gadd is a longtime member of James Taylor’s touring band and for the past four decades has played with the crème de la crème of the music industry. Steely Dan, Paul McCartney, B.B. King, George Benson, James Brown and Al Jarreau have all been a part of Gadd’s musical journey.

Paul Simon says, “[Gadd] is the premier drummer of his generation.” Eric Clapton calls Steve Gadd, “One of the great drummers I’ve played with.” Chick Corea describes him as, “A master of creative grooves.” Gadd is one of the most beloved drummers in the world, lending his passion and skill to a number of iconic recordings. The unmistakable beats in “50 Ways to Leave Your Lover,” “Late in the Evening” and “Aja,” are all compliments of the great, Mr. Gadd.

Gadd has also joined forces with Walt Fowler (trumpet/flugelhorn), Jimmy Johnson (bass), Michael Landau (guitars) and Kevin Hays (keyboards/vocals), to make up the Steve Gadd Band. On their latest self-titled album, the guys have put together 11 tracks; all which beautifully highlight a range of different rhythms and sonic textures.

The renowned drummer recently took time out for a Q&A with AXS after the release of his latest project.

AXS: What’s the first song you ever learned to play?

Steve Gadd: I’d probably have to say John Phillip Sousa’s Marches. My uncle, my dad and my brother used to sit around the family living room and entertain our families. I used to play in marching bands as a kid, too.

AXS: What would you say is one quality every drummer should have?

SG: Listening is probably one of the most important qualities for any musician. 

AXS: How did you first decide living a musician’s life was for you?

SG: I never really decided. It chose me. I played in the High School Band of America and the Army Field Band and when I got out of the army, I went to New York City and gave it a try. 

AXS: Tell me more about what went into your latest album and why you think people need this music in their lives?

SG: Our new album is our third studio project. Everyone contributed tunes, we wrote some together specifically for the album and I just love making music with these guys. I hope people enjoy it as much as we enjoyed making it.

AXS: Talk to me a little bit about the other members of your band and how you all fit together?

SG: Mike, Jimmy, Walt and I’ve been playing in James Taylor’s band for a long time. We’re friends on and off the road. Our wives are all friends and we have a lot of fun together. Larry Goldings was the original keyboard player who was also in James’ band. Kevin Hays has been touring with us for a couple of years now and played on this new album. 

AXS: What has been the greatest lesson you’ve learned throughout your career and who taught it to you?

SG: Every day there are new lessons to be learned as a musician and a person. I don’t think there’s one great lesson.

AXS: What are your top three song picks that anyone who wants to be a drummer should get to know?

SG: I think you should practice to songs you like. After you do that and see which way you lean musically, then you can direct your attention there. 

AXS: What’s on deck for you?

SG: I’m getting ready to go back on the road with James Taylor for the summer and then in the fall, our band will tour in Asia. 

You can pick up select tickets to see James Taylor & His All-Star Band right here at AXS. For more on Steve Gadd you can visit his website.

Source Article from https://m.axs.com/interview-grammy-nominated-drummer-steve-gadd-releases-new-album-and-h-130064