Victoria Nuland, wife of Arch-Neocon Robert Kagan on Russian ‘hacking’– ‘The Hairs Really Went Up on the Back of Our Necks’

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Source Article from https://theuglytruth.wordpress.com/2018/02/05/victoria-nuland-wife-of-arch-neocon-robert-kagan-on-russian-hacking-the-hairs-really-went-up-on-the-back-of-our-necks/

‘Nation’ Writer on Russia ‘Hacking’: ‘I’ve Never Seen Media Malpractice Like This’

On Friday, Fox News’s Tucker Carlson interviewed Stephen F. Cohen, a contributing editor at The Nation. Cohen sharply criticized coverage at the Washington Post and the New York Times, and more generally stated that he has “never seen media malpractice” like the establishment press’s year-long effort to breathe life into what he insists has been a completely ginned-up claim that Russia tried to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

Given that it has leaned hard-left during its entire existence, it might stun readers here to know that Cohen, who is married to magazine editor Katrina vanden Heuvel, strongly believes, based on what he claims is his own extensive research, that there is no evidence of Russian U.S election influence.

Readers should keep in mind, as they view and digest Cohen’s contentions, that they, if true, completely refute the “fact-checkers” at Politifact, who have decided that “Russian election interference is a ‘made-up story'” is 2017’s “Lie of the Year.”

Politifact, which concedes that “It seems unlikely — though not impossible — that Russia interference changed the outcome of the election,” contends that “one man” — President Donald Trump — “keeps saying it didn’t even happen,” strongly implying that Trump is all alone in his belief. That’s wrong — and Cohen is on Politifact’s side of the aisle.

Carlson began by pointing to the print edition version of a Friday Washington Post story. The print story, which has a different headline (“How Trump’s pursuit of Putin has left the U.S. vulnerable to the Russian threat”) from the online version (“Doubting the intelligence, Trump pursues Putin and leaves a Russian threat unchecked”), has a subhead — “Hacking Democracy” — which assumes facts Cohen contends are not in evidence.

The full video segment from the show is here. The first excerpt which follows begins after Cohen was introduced, and deals with that Washington Post item:

Transcript (bolds are mine throughout this post):

(Snip 1, from 0:28 to 1:47 of full segment)

TUCKER CARLSON: So I’m reading the Washington Post today, which is the Jeff Bezos publication. And right on the front page, there’s a piece about Russia. And the subhead says here, “Hacking Democracy,” as if it is a known and universally accepted fact that our democracy was, quote, “hacked.”

Do we know that?

STEPHEN COHEN: We do not. It’s been alleged. Originally it was said that 17 intelligence agencies made that finding. Turned out it was a few people in a couple intelligence agencies.

If you read on in the Washington Post story in the first paragraph, they go back to this claim that it’s the consensus of intelligence agencies. So it’s simply not true.

I have to say that in addition to being a professor, for a long time I was also a paid consultant of a major American television network. I admire mainstream media. I learned a lot. But I have never seen media malpractice like this before in my life.

What that constitutes is essentially making allegations for which there is no verified facts, information, or evidence, and then basing your commentary on it.

So briefly put, it said that somehow Trump has been compromised by Putin, the leader of Russia. Then, when Trump does diplomacy with Putin, the New York Times literally calls it “treason.” I haven’t seen anything like this before.

The next video below contains two snips. In the first, Cohen reacts to the press’s heavy reliance on leaks in the absence of substance, and notes the heavy irony in the left completely switching sides on the intelligence agencies’ presumptive credibility. In the second, Carlson directly asks Cohen if he seen any evidence of Russian attempts to influence the 2016 election:

Transcript:

(Snip 2, from 2:12 to 2:35 of full segment)

COHEN: … A leaker, by definition, has a political agenda. We’d agree on that, right?

CARLSON: Yes, of course.

COHEN: You may not be old enough to remember, but I remember when the media, and particularly the liberal media, was deeply suspicious of intelligence agency sources.

CARLSON: Yes.

COHEN: And now we have a situation where they seem to be the Holy Writ. If they whisper it to you on the telephone, it’s true, and you print it.

(Snip 3, from 3:20 to 3:48)

CARLSON: … Do we have and have you seen any evidence at all that the Russian government materially affected the outcome of the 2016 election?

COHEN: I have heard you say repeatedly there is no evidence. I’ve looked harder than you have. I’ve looked here in America, but I also have looked in Moscow. I mean, when I am there, as people I know, and yes, I confess, I do know people who are or have been Russian intelligence agents. I haven’t found anybody in Moscow who believes this story.

Cohen has been consistently critical of media conduct and the Russian narrative for months. Headlines at a few of his recent columns at The Nation include the following:

  • December 12 — “Media Malpractice Is Criminalizing Better Relations With Russia”
  • November 27 — “Russia Is Not the ‘No. 1 Threat’—or Even Among the Top 5”
  • November 15 — “‘Russiagate’ Zealots (Mainly Democrats) Have Become a Major Threat to US National Security”

<<< Please support MRC’s NewsBusters team with a tax-deductible contribution today. >>>

How utterly fascinating it is that a longtime leftist fellow traveler at one of its furthest-left publications completely disputes the Washington Post’s “Hacking Democracy” assumption, and insists, in the face of Politifact’s contention that there is “a mountain of evidence” supporting Russia’s alleged attempts to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election, that there is none.

Cross-posted at BizzyBlog.com.

Source Article from https://www.newsbusters.org/blogs/nb/tom-blumer/2017/12/16/contributing-editor-nation-russia-2016-election-ive-never-seen-media

WikiLeaks begins publishing source code for CIA hacking tools

WikiLeaks began publishing the source code of alleged CIA hacking tools Thursday in a new series dubbed “Vault 8.”

The source code, according to a press release from the anti-secrecy organization, is intended to “enable investigative journalists, forensic experts and the general public to better identify and understand covert CIA infrastructure components.”

“Source code published in this series contains software designed to run on servers controlled by the CIA,” WikiLeaks writes, stressing that the material does not contain 0-day or undisclosed vulnerabilities that could be utilized by others.

Hive, the first tool featured in Vault 8, aids the agency in controlling malware installed on target devices.

“Even the most sophisticated malware implant on a target computer is useless if there is no way for it to communicate with its operators in a secure manner that does not draw attention,” WikiLeaks writes. “Using Hive even if an implant is discovered on a target computer, attributing it to the CIA is difficult by just looking at the communication of the malware with other servers on the internet.”

“Hive provides a covert communications platform for a whole range of CIA malware to send exfiltrated information to CIA servers and to receive new instructions from operators at the CIA.”

Details on Hive were first revealed last April as part of WikiLeaks’ release of CIA hacking tool documentation known as Vault 7.

While the source code for Hive is unlikely to do little more than assist forensics analysts, the code for more powerful tools in Vault 7, if released, could potentially enable malicious attackers.

These latest leaks, likely from the same source as the Vault 7 files, are believed to have originated from a CIA employee or contractor.

In April of last year it was learned that a joint investigation by the FBI and CIA had begun looking into hundreds of agency members who would have had access to the material.

That same month CIA Director Mike Pompeo criticized WikiLeaks and its founder Julian Assange during his first public speech as head of the agency.

“Assange and his ilk make common cause with dictators today,” Pompeo said at the time. “Yes, they try unsuccessfully to cloak themselves and their actions in the language of liberty and privacy; in reality, however, they champion nothing but their own celebrity. Their currency is clickbait; their moral compass, nonexistent.”

Although then-presidential candidate Donald Trump repeatedly praised WikiLeaks during his campaign, reports claimed last April that Trump’s Justice Department had prepared charges seeking the arrest of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

While Attorney General Jeff Sessions appeared to hint at the alleged charges during a press conference that month, Assange’s lawyer, Barry Pollack, stated that the Department of Justice has not attempted to make contact.

Copyright Information: This article was reprinted with permission from Infowars.com. Please contact the author directly for republishing information.


For almost a decade Gov’t Slaves has worked tirelessly to bring its readers the most critical news the corporate media does not want you to see. We have no intrusive ads, pop-ups or clickbait, just NEWS. If you happen to be in a position to support my work, PLEASE consider making a one-time donation to fund the site. Your support is humbly appreciated. Thomas @ Gov’t Slaves



Source Article from http://govtslaves.info/2017/11/wikileaks-begins-publishing-source-code-for-cia-hacking-tools/

‘UK teen almost hacking US officials a serious concern for American security’

British teenager Kane Gamble pleaded guilty to trying to hack top US officials’ personal computers.

Gamble is autistic and was only 15 years old when he attempted to hack the computers of former CIA chief John Brennan and the head of security of the Obama administration. He was released on bail and is due to be sentenced by a British regional court in December.

While it is not clear how close Gamble was to getting hold of sensitive information, red flags have been raised about the ability of the US government network to defend itself against hacking.

RTKane Gamble is charged with attempting to hack the computers. Did he actually get access to sensitive information?

Mark Chapman: The important thing to recognize here is that he’s pleaded guilty to the hacking allegations. That is certainly something that we don’t condone. But there is a serious concern here – vulnerability of American computers – because if a British teenager can get access, or even look to get enough access that he has been caught, that is something that other hackers, be they from rogue states, be they from anyone wishing to do the US harm… that is very concerning.

RT:  Were they personal computers with highly sensitive personal information, or just somebody’s laptops?

MC: As I understand it, they were personal computers. But that distinction isn’t perhaps as significant as people would often make out. If you can access somebody’s personal computer, you learn all about their life, you can then use that information to get the passwords, to get everything that they know, that they have, to enable to then use that information to access further. 

RT:   So the guy just admitted that he attempted to get this information. So, if he didn’t manage to enter the system, doesn’t that mean that the security here actually worked?

MC: That is one for the CIA to be looking at themselves. Clearly it is very concerning that however close he got, whether or not he got in, that it was close enough for them to be concerned, for them to not just brush it off, but go to the effort of informing the UK government of putting the arrest in place for him to have to plead guilty to the charges.

RT:  Kane is autistic and was about 15 years old when he committed the crimes. Will they go lightly on him because of that?

MC: It is hard to tell. I think it would be the right thing to do if that was the case. However, we saw with Gary McKinnon that the element of autism isn’t something that will be taken into account. His age might well be. This is a child, when he was committing those crimes. We will have to see what happens in due course.

Source Article from https://www.rt.com/usa/406040-us-computers-vulnerable-hackers/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=RSS

The not-so-genius effects of hacking your brain with smart drugs

    

When you talk to brain-hackers from Silicon Valley, they talk of creating the perfect stack – a combination of natural and pharmaceutical nootropics that can help make them into a super-powered genius that can go hours without sleep while maintaining massive focus. It sounds like a cool way to hack the brain, but this practice can come at a price.

The problem is that many of the pharmaceutical versions (and sometimes even the natural ones) can be damaging.

In the early days, people trying to crank out loads of computer code, write the next best-selling novel, cram for a university exam, or simply party like it was 1999, used micro-doses of LSD or Adderall, a prescription drug normally used to treat ADHD, and some of these practices are still used today.

The thinking behind this phenomenon is that if supplements like glutamate, an excitatory substance to the brain and nervous system can successfully be utilized for people who have cognitive dysfunction like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s, ADHD, etc., certainly these supplements could help enhance memory creativity, and cognitive performance in “normal” people.

This assumption is not entirely wrong. We already know that even changing our nutrition, getting better sleep (not even necessarily more), and lowering our stress, frees up the brain to take in more, and process experiences and make memories faster. This can translate into all sorts of benefits, from super learning to even increased psychic awareness.

There’s just one caveat. Everyone’s brain is very different.

For example, a natural substance called choline is highly available in breast milk, and in certain foods we eat. There’s a lot of it in breast milk because babies need it to help their brains grow, but choline does tons of stuff like help our cells form, our muscles work normally, and even the liver to function properly.

It would seem that more choline would be a “no-brainer” when it comes to boosting brain power even in grown adults, but the more is better attitude in the west is proven wrong once again – and this is a natural substance. Choline in high doses can also cause low blood pressure, nausea, vomiting, excessive salivation, diarrhea, constipation, anorexia, dizziness, insomnia and headaches.

To be fair, many people take excessive doses of things like ginseng or ginkgo biloba extract and experience intestinal issues that can be excruciatingly painful; this can be true of consuming too much fish oil even – also natural brain boosters, but the pharmaceutical brain hacking drugs pose even riskier potentials.

The Popularity of Nootropics is Growing

Despite potential dangers, there are already more than 70,000 subreddit subscribers to the subject “nootropics.”

It seems more and more of us are looking for a way to be the best version of ourselves, but depending on who you ask – even the pharmaceutical nootropics on the market, which can be stacked and combined in an infinite number of ways, changing the chemical dance going on in our brains – are totally safe, or dangerously side-effect causing.

Originally, the criteria for nootropics were that they had to be brain protective, and promote brain health. It seems that original definition of nootropics has gone by the wayside.

Who the Heck Knows?

“Who the heck knows?” says Kim Urban, a Philadelphia neurophysiologist talking about the possible negative side effects of pharmaceutical grade nootropics. “So few studies have been done, and those that have were not the most controlled trials.”

For example, a study found that Ritalin – a drug often “Stacked” by bio-hackers can eventually reduce brain plasticity. Other nootropics can cause the jitters, insomnia, muscle spasms, and brain fog, and we still don’t know what happens to someone’s brain or nervous system once they go off the smart drugs after prolonged use.

Nonetheless, brain hackers are impatient, often not even waiting for clinical trials for smart drugs that are being developed. They go to sites like selfhacked and figure out which chemical compounds they can experiment with to create a “super-brain.”

It’s like the movie Breaking Bad on their kitchen counters.

A Safer Alternative

In the West is seems we’re always look for a short-cut. Nootropics may provide some benefits when used mindfully, but the risks could possibly outweigh the rewards. Conversely, there are ample studies proving that a mindfulness practice can eventually create brain waves that cause “super-learning,” without causing negative side effects.

In the brain wave frequency above 40 Hz, Tibetan Buddhist monks have been able to learn, memorize, and think exceptionally fast – tapping into brain functions that brain-hackers could only dream of.

This is the gamma wave state. It translates to higher mental activity, expanded perception and problem solving abilities, and higher levels of consciousness.

On Earth, nuclear explosions and lightning produce gamma rays. You can just imagine what gamma waves at that level of energy can do for our thought processes. But hey, you can’t just pop a pill to reach this state of mind, or so it appears.

Source Article from https://www.sott.net/article/363302-The-not-so-genius-effects-of-hacking-your-brain-with-smart-drugs

Abbott Lab’s 465,000 pacemakers recalled as vulnerable to hacking attacks

    

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has announced a recall of 465,000 pacemakers after the devices were found to be vulnerable to hacking.

The pacemakers in question were manufactured by Abbott Laboratories. The devices are all radio-controlled, which means a hacker could potentially access the network that the pacemakers interface with to change their settings or even stop them entirely. That could prove fatal.

Yes, hackers can now literally stop your robot heart with their smartphone. Yes, we are living in a cyberpunk dystopia.

“As medical devices become increasingly interconnected via the internet, hospital networks, other medical devices, and smartphones, there is an increased risk of exploitation of cybersecurity vulnerabilities,” read the FDA statement accompanying the recall.

There have been “no known reports of patient harm related to the cybersecurity vulnerabilities,” the FDA added.

“The pacemaker devices to which this update applies include the RF telemetry versions of the following devices in the US: Accent SR RF™, Accent MRI™, Assurity™, Assurity MRI™, Accent DR RF™, Anthem RF™, Allure RF™, Allure Quadra RF™, and Quadra Allure MP RF™,” read the St. Jude Medical website. St. Jude has been owned by Abbott Laboratories since January 2017.

As we’ve said before, Abbott is resolving all old St. Jude Medical issues,” they added. “These planned updates further strengthen the security and device management tools for our connected cardiac rhythm management devices. The cybersecurity landscape is always changing, which is why we’re working across the healthcare sector to proactively address issues that affect all connected technologies.”

Abbott did not use the term ‘recall,’ preferring instead “firmware update.” They intend to install a cybersecurity patch that will close this vulnerability. Those with one of the affected pacemakers already installed in their chests won’t need them replaced: they just need to go to the hospital for a three-minute firmware update.

In 2016, research group Muddy Waters wrote that St. Jude pacemakers might be vulnerable to hacking, calling the medical device company’s “apparent lack of device security is egregious, and in our view, likely a product of years of neglect.”

In May 2017, medical device security consultancy WhiteScope extended that warning to the other three major manufacturers of pacemakers.

“The FDA reminds patients, patient caregivers, and health care providers that any medical device connected to a communications network (e.g. wi-fi, public or home internet) may have cybersecurity vulnerabilities that could be exploited by unauthorized users,” the federal agency wrote. “However, the increased use of wireless technology and software in medical devices can also often offer safer, more efficient, convenient, and timely health care delivery.”

Source Article from https://www.sott.net/article/360887-Abbott-Labs-465000-pacemakers-recalled-as-vulnerable-to-hacking-attacks

Heart Hack: 465,000 Pacemakers Recalled as Vulnerable to Hacking Attacks

The pacemakers in question were manufactured by Abbott Laboratories. The devices are all radio-controlled, which means a hacker could potentially access the network that the pacemakers interface with to change their settings or even stop them entirely. That could prove fatal.

Yes, hackers can now literally stop your robot heart with their smartphone. Yes, we are living in a cyberpunk dystopia.

“As medical devices become increasingly interconnected via the internet, hospital networks, other medical devices, and smartphones, there is an increased risk of exploitation of cybersecurity vulnerabilities,” read the FDA statement accompanying the recall.

There have been “no known reports of patient harm related to the cybersecurity vulnerabilities,” the FDA added.

“The pacemaker devices to which this update applies include the RF telemetry versions of the following devices in the US: Accent SR RF™, Accent MRI™, Assurity™, Assurity MRI™, Accent DR RF™, Anthem RF™, Allure RF™, Allure Quadra RF™, and Quadra Allure MP RF™,” read the St. Jude Medical website. St. Jude has been owned by Abbott Laboratories since January 2017.

“As we’ve said before, Abbott is resolving all old St. Jude Medical issues,” they added. “These planned updates further strengthen the security and device management tools for our connected cardiac rhythm management devices. The cybersecurity landscape is always changing, which is why we’re working across the healthcare sector to proactively address issues that affect all connected technologies.”

Abbott did not use the term ‘recall,’ preferring instead “firmware update.” They intend to install a cybersecurity patch that will close this vulnerability. Those with one of the affected pacemakers already installed in their chests won’t need them replaced: they just need to go to the hospital for a three-minute firmware update.

In 2016, research group Muddy Waters wrote that St. Jude pacemakers might be vulnerable to hacking, calling the medical device company’s “apparent lack of device security is egregious, and in our view, likely a product of years of neglect.”

In May 2017, medical device security consultancy WhiteScope extended that warning to the other three major manufacturers of pacemakers.

“The FDA reminds patients, patient caregivers, and health care providers that any medical device connected to a communications network (e.g. wi-fi, public or home internet) may have cybersecurity vulnerabilities that could be exploited by unauthorized users,” the federal agency wrote. “However, the increased use of wireless technology and software in medical devices can also often offer safer, more efficient, convenient, and timely health care delivery.”

Source Article from http://govtslaves.info/heart-hack-465000-pacemakers-recalled-vulnerable-hacking-attacks/

Food samples given away at grocery stores rely on "hacking" the brains of consumers with a clever influence strategy

Image: Food samples given away at grocery stores rely on “hacking” the brains of consumers with a clever influence strategy

(Natural News)
If you’ve ever gone to a supermarket and taken a free sample of one of the store’s products – maybe a slice of cheese or a small cup of soup, for example – then chances are somebody tried to hack into your brain. Of course, “hacked” in this sense doesn’t mean using some kind of mind reading super power that you’d see in a science fiction film; rather, it is a persuasion technique that has been written about and studied by psychologists for many years.

A report published earlier this month by the American Psychological Association discussed this very concept, and how psychological persuasion techniques really can have an effect on the consumers’ behavior. “When someone offers a free sample, it’s not really free. It comes with the implied expectation that if a person accepts it, he or she will feel obligated to return the favor and eventually pay for the full product,” said the report, which was published on ScienceDaily.com. “That’s just one of the many insights psychology has uncovered about the subtle mechanics of persuasion and how people can recognize and respond to attempts to influence their behavior.” (Related: Read about how different colors can affect our moods and emotions.)

Speaking at the 125th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, Robert Cialdini, a professor emeritus of psychology and marketing at Arizona State University, said, “Persuasion is no longer just an art; it’s an out-and-out science.” Professor Cialdini continued, “Indeed, a vast body of scientific evidence now exists on how, when and why people say yes to influence attempts.”

With respect to trying free samples at the grocery store, many of us have most likely experienced this feeling of guilt after walking away from a vendor. Even if you didn’t end up purchasing the full product, chances are you at least gave it some thought because of this unspoken obligation you felt to return the favor. Truth be told, this is actually a psychological persuasion technique, and it is intentionally used more often than you think.

It is fair to say that the majority of persuasion techniques used today to get you to buy certain products or services use this same type of “brain hacking” strategy as the one described by the American Psychological Association. The website FastCompany.com has compiled an entire list of these persuasion tactics, including the scarcity principle, which states that people generally want products more when they are in short supply. This is why department stores often hang a sign on their products that says “just for today,” and why car companies often air commercials that say “you better act fast before it’s too late.”

Another “brain hacking” technique, called the Conversion Theory, states that the minority in a group of people are the most effective voices when it comes to persuading those in the majority, because those in the majority are the most likely to have joined simply because they felt there were no alternatives.

One persuasion tactic that many businesses use is informally known as the Yale Attitude Change Approach, which is based on years of research and analysis. Yale found that factors such as attractiveness and the way in which you speak can have an impact on how effective one is at persuading others.

Whether it’s in a grocery store or elsewhere, one thing we know for sure is that as research into persuasion techniques continues, psychology will play an increasingly significant role. Gone are the days when businesses simply went out and told consumers why their product is better than everybody else’s. Today, they know how to get inside your head – how to “hack your brain,” if you will – and get you to do things that you otherwise may not have done.

Sources include: 

ScienceDaily.com

FastCompany.com

<!–

–>

Source Article from http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-08-28-food-samples-given-away-at-grocery-stores-rely-on-hacking-the-brains-of-consumers-with-a-clever-influence-strategy.html

Leaked docs reveal German police to gain greater ‘hacking’ powers by end of 2017

    

German police will be able to use surveillance software by the end of the year that can hack into people’s smartphones and read encrypted messages in such services as WhatsApp, says a report that cites a leaked document.

A new version of the German police’s Remote Communication Interception Software (RCIS), which is used for surveillance over electronic devices, will be ready by the end of the year, a German independent media outlet, the Netzpolitik, reports, citing a leaked Interior Ministry internal progress report it obtained.

Unlike the previous version of the program, which was limited to surveillance only over desktop computers, the new software will be able to hack into smartphones and tablets with Android, iOS and Blackberry operating systems.

It can also circumvent the encryption systems built into various anonymous messaging services such as WhatsApp or Telegram by hacking directly into the devices themselves and obtaining the messages directly from the “source” – the users’ screens.

In June, the German Bundestag adopted a law that allowed the police to hack into messengers such as WhatsApp using “state trojans” to intercept user communications before they are encrypted on their devices as well as to gain full access to their chat messages, video recordings or other private data.

The law also gave police power to hack into the devices of all people suspected of any criminal activity – not just those who are suspected of terrorism.

However, the leak showed that the new version of the surveillance software that allowed hacking into smartphones and spying on anonymous messengers has been in development by the German Federal Criminal Police (BKA) since at least the beginning of 2016 – almost a year and a half before the security service was legally allowed to develop such software.

The document obtained by Netzpolitik also revealed that the BKA purchased commercially developed surveillance software, the FinSpy, as early as in 2012. It was originally regarded as a potential substitution for state-developed software that could be used during a”transition period” between the BKA receiving allowance to hack into people’s devices and developing its own surveillance program.

Later, the BKA decided to keep it as a backup in case of its own software being compromised.

However, it has not yet used the software, despite paying some €150,000 for it over five years, as it is able to go well beyond the restrictions set in the law, the document says.

FinSpy, developed by Gamma International in Munich, is able to record all calls and messages on a mobile device as well as remotely turn on its microphone and camera and locate and track the device in real time.

FinSpy’s manufacturer has already altered the software three times to make it compatible with German law, Netzpolitik reports.

The latest developments have provoked criticism from activists and politicians, who believe that massive state surveillance will eventually compromise people’s security instead of protecting them against any threats.

“To sell state hacking as just another surveillance measure like any other is, in the face of the newly published papers, a brazen distortion of the truth,” the Chaos Computer Club spokesman, Falk Garbsch, told Netzpolitik. “An arsenal of Trojans is being built as if it were already normal for the state to hack the digital brains of its citizens.”

Frank Herrmann, a member of Germany’s Pirate Party, warned that hacking directly into mobile devices could lead to more serious consequences than monitoring phone calls. “People don’t realize that this malware endangers the security of the whole device,” he told Deutsche Welle, adding that “the technological intervention is much more severe than just listening in on a phone call.”

In the meantime, Erin Omanovic, an activist of the UK-based NGO Privacy International, told Deutsche Welle that similar measures aimed at giving security services the right to hack into people’s electronic devices are being taken not only in Germany but also in many other countries.

“We’re seeing efforts to legislate for hacking powers in the UK, in Austria, in Italy, and Germany,” he said.

“Some of these capabilities have already been practiced across Europe,” Omanovic said. “The UK, for example, has been engaged in hacking, but just hasn’t legalized it. There’s a complete lack of safeguards and oversight over the use of this type of technology.”

“And there have been some examples of misuse by governments around the world. For example, there’s evidence that FinSpy was used to target human rights activists and lawyers in Bahrain,” the activist added.

Source Article from https://www.sott.net/article/357428-Leaked-docs-reveal-German-police-to-gain-greater-hacking-powers-by-end-of-2017

In-Depth Analysis Kills Russian Hacking Narrative, Shows DNC Planted Fake Evidence

hackinghacking

Washington, D.C. – A damning new technical analysis reveals that files stolen from the Democratic National Committee (DNC) during the 2016 election cycle were most likely downloaded to a USB drive by someone with physical access to a computer connected to the DNC network. The analysis refutes the official narrative of the files being hacked remotely by the Russians – as popularized by the U.S. corporate media, without any actual evidence ever publicly presented.

The alleged DNC hacker, Guccifer 2.0, in an interview with Motherboard in June 2016, claimed he used a zero-day exploit to bypass security on the DNC servers and steal files, which he subsequently published under the title “NGP-VAN.”

While the DNC leak was quickly attributed to the Russian hackers by U.S. intelligence agencies, a document published by an individual going by the name Forensicator reveals how the 7-zip file published by Guccifer 2.0 was transferred at a speed of 23 MB/s, making it “unlikely that this initial data transfer could have been done remotely over the Internet.”

“The initial copying activity was likely done from a computer system that had direct access to the data,” the report from the Forensicator stated. “By ‘direct access’ we mean that the individual who was collecting the data either had physical access to the computer where the data was stored, or the data was copied over a local high speed network (LAN).”

Below are some of the key findings presented by the Forensicator’s report:

• On 7/5/2016 at approximately 6:45 PM Eastern time, someone copied the data that eventually appears on the “NGP VAN” 7zip file (the subject of this analysis). This 7zip file was published by a persona named Guccifer 2, two months later on September 13, 2016.

• Due to the estimated speed of transfer (23 MB/s) calculated in this study, it is unlikely that this initial data transfer could have been done remotely over the Internet.

• The initial copying activity was likely done from a computer system that had direct access to the data. By “direct access” we mean that the individual who was collecting the data either had physical access to the computer where the data was stored, or the data was copied over a local high speed network (LAN).

• They may have copied a much larger collection of data than the data present in the NGP VAN 7zip. This larger collection of data may have been as large as 19 GB. In that scenario the NGP VAN 7zip file represents only 1/10th of the total amount of material taken.

• This initial copying activity was done on a system where Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) settings were in force. Most likely, the computer used to initially copy the data was located somewhere on the East Coast.

• The data was likely initially copied to a computer running Linux, because the file last modified times all reflect the apparent time of the copy and this is a characteristic of the the Linux ‘cp’ command (using default options).

• A Linux OS may have been booted from a USB flash drive and the data may have been copied back to the same flash drive, which will likely have been formatted with the Linux (ext4) file system.

• On September 1, 2016, two months after copying the initial large collection of (alleged) DNC related content (the so-called NGP/VAN data), a subset was transferred to working directories on a system running Windows. The .rar files included in the final 7zip file were built from those working directories.

• The computer system where the working directories were built had Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) settings in force. Most likely, this system was located somewhere on the East Coast.

• The .rar files and plain files that eventually end up in the “NGP VAN” 7zip file disclosed by Guccifer 2.0 on 9/13/2016 were likely first copied to a USB flash drive, which served as the source data for the final 7zip file. There is no information to determine when or where the final 7zip file was built.

The Forensicator’s analysis noted that data from the 7-zip file showed the .rar files were built on September 1, 2016, while the other files were last modified on July 5, 2016. According to the report, “when the .rar files are unpacked using a program called WinRAR, their timestamps were preserved from the date they were transferred. The subsequent timestamps of those .rar files were relative times, while the times recorded in the 7-zip files are absolute times, recorded in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).” The Forensicator concluded that if the .rar files were adjusted to Eastern Time, they “fall into the same range as the last modified times for the directories archived in the .rar files.”

Thus, the Forensicator’s analysis determined that the files were likely built on a computer system running on Eastern Daylight Savings Time (EDT) timezone, meaning that the system was most likely located somewhere on the East Coast of the United States.

Additionally, the Forensicator also generated a list of the files sorted by the date they were last modified and imported the list into an Excel spreadsheet. Analyzing the files by date last modified, he observed that the last modified times were clustered together in a 14-minute time period on July 5, 2016.

In an analysis of the metadata, he found a majority of the time it took for the files to be copied, 12 minutes and 48 seconds of the 14 minutes and 15 seconds, was allocated to “time gaps” that appear between several top-level files and directories. The report concluded that this indicated that the files were chosen from a much larger collection of files.

Finally, and perhaps most damning of all, the transfer speed of the files published by Guccifer 2.0, was determined by the Forensicator, which he concluded that if the 1.98 GB 7-zip archive published by Guccifer was copied at a rate of 22.6 MB/s, and all the time gaps were attributed to additional file copying, the initial file copy would be 10 times larger, or 19.3 GB.

All of this leads to a likely conclusion that Guccifer 2.0 is/was a U.S. intelligence asset deployed to muddy the waters surrounding the DNC leak and shift blame to the Russians.

What, if any, independent, verifiable evidence is there that Guccifer 2.0 hacked the DNC?

Basically, there is no evidence to show the Guccifer 2.0 persona was Wikileaks source. There is no evidence that he actually hacked into the DNC beyond the fact he had acquired some DNC/DCCC documents. Conversely, there is significant evidence to contradict his claims thanks to ThreatConnect discrediting his breach claims, and revealing that he was intentionally working to get attributed for the malware discoveries!

Even more damning, according to Forensicator, the Guccifer 2.0 persona curiously chose to “use a Russian VPN (after choosing to taint documents with Russian language) and was noted to have been in possession of a password for a password-protected area of the DCLeaks site (which, plausibly, he could have been given after promising to upload some of his leaks – DCLeaks were willing to give the same password out to the press in exchange for the promise of writing a story about them!)”

Virtually everything previously reported about the Guccifer 2.0 persona has been based on assumption, acceptance of his admissions as factual, with the U.S. public being propagandized by a corporate media to take his conjecture at face value, while the real story is who is behind this persona, and for what purpose?

In summation, we’ve seen deliberately placed “Russian Fingerprints,” efforts to forge perceived association to Wikileaks and Seth Rich, and DNC breach claims discredited.

The report notes that, Guccifer 2.0 utilized “‘Trump Opposition Research’ like it was an identity card only one day after it was advertised by Shawn Henry in a Washington Post article. This likely U.S. intelligence asset publicly noted how he could only ever “hack” the DNC, lacked syntactical traits of a Russian speaking English and recently – has been shown as most likely to have accessed some of his files locally, while on the DNC network (within the Eastern Time zone).”

It appears likely that the appearance of the Guccifer 2.0 person was an intelligence operation designed to hide the fact that the DNC was not hacked by Russians, and was more than likely accessed by someone with physical access to the DNC servers.

Source Article from http://thefreethoughtproject.com/russian-hacking-analysis-fake/