STUPID: Publix grocery stores ban LATIN words on birthday cakes because staffers think Latin words are profanity


Image: STUPID: Publix grocery stores ban LATIN words on birthday cakes because staffers think Latin words are profanity

(Natural News)
A South Carolina teenager was forced into having an embarrassing conversation with his friends and loved ones after a local Publix grocery store where his mom ordered him a graduation cake decided to arbitrarily censor its congratulatory wording, ignorantly believing it to be profanity.

Jacob Koscinski, a home-schooler who recently graduated from high school, achieved an impressive 4.89 grade point average (GPA), which means he graduated with highest honors. And there’s a term for this in Latin, Summa Cum Laude, that’s commonly used to describe students like Jacob who excel academically above their peers.

But when Jacob’s mother filled out the text form on the Publix website asking that her son’s cake bear an inscription with this Latin honor phrase, the grocery chain edited out the middle word. Because this word is sometimes used to describe male reproductive fluid in English slang, Publix decided to remove and replace it with three dashes.

The grocery store didn’t notify the Koscinski family, however. Instead, Jacob’s mother reportedly took the cake home and opened it, only to discover that the edible inscription she requested had been altered by the Publix censor police, which obviously have no idea what Summa Cum Laude means in academic terms.

“He did not know we were getting a cake because he’s not a big cake eater,” stated Jacob’s mom Cara to local media. “So we were all standing there waiting to see it and when we opened it, it was a huge shock to all of us.”

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“The website had censored me and this is a website that you can refer to for the Latin term for Summa Cum Laude which means highest honors,” she added.

Since many of Jacob’s family members didn’t understand why the middle word of this term was removed, he had no choice but to explain it to them.

“The cake experience was kind of frustrating and humiliating because I had to explain to my friends and family … what that meant,” Jacob stated. “And they were giggling uncontrollably. At least my friends were.”

After notifying the Publix store in question, located on Savannah Highway and Main Road, Cara was offered an apology and a full refund by the manager.

“It’s fine for us to be compensated for the cake,” Cara added in a statement to the media. “We’re just happy that our son graduated school and has a bright future.

Publix routinely plays morality police while hypocritically working with Big Pharma to keep cannabis illegal

This is the same Publix grocery store chain, of course, that spent nearly a million dollars trying to overturn medical cannabis legalization in the state of Florida, where voters overwhelmingly indicated that they no longer want to be prosecuted and jailed for using a plant.

Publix heiress Carol Jenkins Barnett, daughter of Publix founder George W. Jenkins, personally donated $800,000 to the anti-legalization group “Drug Free Florida,” which spent its own organizational fortune trying to keep prohibition in place throughout the Sunshine State.

Since the company profits heavily from the pharmacies that are part of every one of its grocery stores, Publix recognized cannabis legalization as a threat to this cash windfall. As a result, Publix lobbied heavily to keep cannabis illegal in Florida, even as it plays the morality police in other areas such as magazine censor in the checkout line and cake wording censor in the bakery.

Keep in mind that Publix has direct ties to both the Florida Medical Association (FMA) and PhRMA, which are aggressively anti-cannabis and pro-pharmaceutical. The FMA in particular, as explained in a report published by the Miami New Times, has an entire lobbying wing dedicated to “Pharmaceutical Corporate Affairs” that basically works to keep pharmaceuticals as the only available medicine to Americans.

Read Banned.news for more examples of speech that’s being banned in modern society.

Sources for this article include:

ABCNews4.com

NaturalNews.com

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Source Article from http://www.naturalnews.com/2018-05-23-stupid-publix-grocery-stores-ban-latin-words-on-birthday-cakes.html

Is your grocery bill too high?

Perhaps you’re not yet aware of these clever tricks for bringing it down.

Keeping food costs under control can be a real challenge. Depending on where you live, how many people you have to feed, and what your dietary preferences are, grocery bills have a knack for creeping upwards and eating into one’s attempts to save. Fortunately, there are some clever tricks that can help you pare it down.

1. Make a cash budget and stick to it. This is the first thing to do if your grocery bill feels out of control. Be strict about limiting yourself to the money you’ve brought, and using cash helps considerably with this, especially if you leave debit and credit cards at home.

2. Buy less. Americans throw away an estimated 20 percent of the groceries they buy, due in large part to impulse buying. If that sounds familiar, then you’re likely buying more than you need. Start shopping for fewer items on a more frequent basis. Make a list and do not deviate from it.

3. Don’t take expiry dates too seriously. Enormous quantities of food are thrown away because people read the best before/expiration dates and assume items are no longer safe for consumption. That’s rarely the case. These dates, rather, are meant as guidelines. Learn to use your senses to detect whether or not a food can still be eaten. If in doubt, check out this great website that will tell you exactly when it’s best to eat a given product and how long it will keep.

4. Buy fewer beverages, snack foods, and pre-packaged items. Beverages such as juice, bottled and sparkling water, soda, and iced tea add unnecessary dollars to your bill, not to mention sugar to your diet. Packaged foods and snacks are often marked up highly for their convenience, nor do they offer much nutritional value compared to their fresh or frozen counterparts.

5. Buy store-brand products. As blogger The Frugal Girl advises in an article on this same topic, “Store-brand items have come a long way, and if you only buy name brands, you’re missing out on a big opportunity to save.” Go for the cheapest, most basic canned tomatoes, crackers, pasta, cheese, etc. As always, take a look at the ingredient list to ensure you’re getting a good product.

6. Shop clearance. Figure out when your grocery store clears its shelves most thoroughly. For me that’s Sundays, when I can always find a great number of products marked down 50 percent. Also, some stories reduce all prepared foods (i.e. salads, soups, rotisserie chickens, etc.) by 50 percent in the last hour before closing. If you eat meat, this is big money-saver.

7. Less meat, more beans. Meat can take up a significant portion of one’s grocery bill, which is why cutting it out (or at least reducing significantly) can make a big financial difference. If you’re used to eating it a lot, go down to every other day, then stretch it further. Use smaller quantities and mix with lentils, beans, or soy.

8. Stop buying disposable items. You might as well throw your money directly in the garbage when you buy disposable items, such as paper towels, Ziplock bags, dishwashing sponges, and paper napkins. All of these items have reusable alternatives that you can reuse for years without incurring additional cost.

Source Article from https://www.treehugger.com/green-food/wondering-why-your-grocery-bill-so-high.html

FDA finds glyphosate weedkiller residues in nearly all grocery foods, but has spent years hiding test results from the public


Image: FDA finds glyphosate weedkiller residues in nearly all grocery foods, but has spent years hiding test results from the public

(Natural News)
The two decades between 1994 and 2014 saw global glyphosate use boom from just over 56 million kilograms (123 million pounds) to around 826 million kilograms per year. Glyphosate is the world’s most popular weed killer and is the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup product. In the United States alone, farmers douse their wheat, oats, corn and soybean fields in over 200 million pounds of this toxic chemical each year. Some spinach and almond farmers also spray it on their fields before the growing season.

Now, a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request by The Guardian newspaper has uncovered documents confirming that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has quietly been testing food samples to check for glyphosate residues but has not released its findings to the public. The Guardian notes that the agency has struggled to find any foods that have not been contaminated by this herbicide.

In an email to some of his colleagues, FDA chemist Richard Thompson noted, “I have brought wheat crackers, granola cereal and corn meal from home and there’s a fair amount in all of them.” He noted that the only food he had on hand that was not found to contain glyphosate traces was broccoli.

Even though the documents reveal that some of the foods tested contained 6.5 parts per million of glyphosate – well above the legal limit of 5.0 ppm – the FDA insists that these results don’t count, since the foods used in the tests were not “official” samples.

Back in 2015, the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) labeled the herbicide glyphosate as “probably carcinogenic to humans,” and linked it to an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

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The IARC report noted:

Glyphosate currently has the highest global production volume of all herbicides. The largest use worldwide is in agriculture. The agricultural use of glyphosate has increased sharply since the development of crops that have been genetically modified to make them resistant to glyphosate. Glyphosate is also used in forestry, urban, and home applications. Glyphosate has been detected in the air during spraying, in water, and in food. The general population is exposed primarily through residence near sprayed areas, home use, and diet, and the level that has been observed is generally low.

The FDA insists that though it has discovered glyphosate residues on so many of the foods tested, these levels are low and are therefore not cause for concern. As such, they feel it is not in the public’s best interest to make their findings known.

Tracey Woodruff, a professor at the University of California San Francisco’s School of Medicine, disagrees.

“People care about what contaminants are in their food. If there is scientific information about these residues in the food, the FDA should release it,” she told The Guardian. “It helps people make informed decisions. Taxpayers paid for the government to do this work, they should get to see the information.”

Linda Birnbaum, toxicologist and director of the U.S. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), warns that even low-level exposure to glyphosate can be very dangerous because we are exposed to many different sources of this chemical and its effects are cumulative.

Many natural health advocates have spoken out about the FDA’s cover-up of its test findings and the fact that it took 40 years for them to start testing for glyphosate residue in the first place. (Related: Discover where glyphosate might be lurking at Glyphosate.news.)

These types of findings reinforce the need for us all to take responsibility for our own health and limit our exposure to glyphosate by purchasing or growing our own organic, pesticide-free fresh produce.

Sources for this article include:

IARC.fr[PDF]

TheGuardian.com

TechTimes.com

NYDailyNews.com

Statista.com

USRTK.org

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Source Article from http://www.naturalnews.com/2018-05-04-fda-finds-glyphosate-weedkiller-residues-in-nearly-all-grocery-foods.html

The problems with Amsterdam’s plastic-free grocery aisle

The aisle relies heavily on biodegradable plastics, which have serious drawbacks.

Earlier this winter, a supermarket in Amsterdam called Ekoplaza made headlines for having the first-ever plastic-free aisle. At the time, I wrote enthusiastically, “The aisle features more than 700 food items, including meats, sauces, yogurts, cereals, and chocolate; and, as unbelievable as it sounds, there’s not a speck of plastic in sight — only cardboard, glass, metal, and compostable materials.”

My assessment was not entirely accurate, however, because there was plenty of plastic in sight; it just happened to be made of compostable materials, such as plant cellulose, wood pulp, algae, grass, cornstarch, shrimp shells, etc. It looks like plastic, but is considered different because it’s not not made entirely from fossil fuels and is biodegradable. Some background via The Plastic Planet, which has partnered with Ekoplaza to create the aisle:

“Unlike conventional plastics, which will exist for centuries on our planet, biomaterials are designed to be composted – either in your home compost or in industrial composting facilities. They should be put in the same bin as your food waste, not your plastic recycling bin. All the biomaterial packaging in Ekoplaza Lab is certified as OK Home Compostable or BS EN13432, the key standard for industrial composting across Europe and the UK.”

Ekoplaza store view© Ekoplaza (via Facebook)

Not everyone is impressed by these efforts. Australian zero waste blogger Lindsay Miles is outraged by a plastic free aisle that’s full of plastic lookalikes. She sees the biodegradable plastic solution as seriously lacking because there is so much it fails to address. In an excellent blog post on the topic, she lists the problems with Ekoplaza’s approach. I’ve shared some of her thoughts below and added a few of mine.

1. The language is confusing. A promo video refers to this biodegradable packaging as ‘disappearing’ within 12 weeks, but that is inaccurate: “That’s impossible science. Compost, degrade, dissolve, evaporate – call it what it is. Nothing disappears.” Even the products themselves are confusing; for example, did you know that cellulose tube netting, used to sell oranges and pretty much identical to regular plastic netting, will degrade in a home composter? It’s unlikely that the average shopper would know this, or even try it.

2. There is no resource reduction. A tremendous amount of material is still required to make these biodegradable plastics. Miles writes:

“Growing huge amounts of food (sugar, corn, tapioca) with the sole purpose of synthesizing it into packets so that food items can be neatly displayed with predetermined portions in perfect rows in the supermarket? The land, energy and carbon footprint of that is huge.”

One fact I was especially shocked to learn last year while reading “Life Without Plastic” (book) was that a so-called biodegradable bag only needs to contain 20 percent plant material in order to be labeled as such. The other 80 percent could be fossil fuel-based plastic resins and synthetic additives. This is considered ‘residue.’

3. Compostable is a slippery term. Many of the plant-based plastics in Ekoplaza are compostable in industrial facilities. These are not widely available, or even if they are, they might run for a cycle time that’s shorter than what is needed to compost a particular item.

4. Compostable plastics do not biodegrade in the ocean. Alarm over the ocean plastic problem has driven many of the efforts to go plastic-free and zero waste, and yet these so-called greener products act the same as conventional plastics in water. Miles writes:

“No compostable plastic to date has been shown to break down in the marine environment. As plastic packaging is lightweight, floats, blows in the wind and can be carried by animals, it ends up in the ocean.”

5. This packaging still generates harmful waste. No matter how a plastic bag has been made, it’s just as capable of suffocating an animal, damaging a seagull’s gut, snagging on a sea turtle. These products are impossible to contain, and unless they’re in a proper industrial composting facility, the potential for littering and harm to animals is still there.

I am sure Ekoplaza and its partner, A Plastic Planet, have good intentions, but their approach falls short of what is really needed. It’s too focused on maintaining the status quo, rather than challenging customers to adopt a radically different and more effective shopping model. I do understand the importance of convenience and how this is integral to people minimizing their planetary impact, but there comes a point where we’re going to have to question the way we do things and become used to the idea of taking refillable containers to the store.

There are far better models for plastic-free shopping. From outdoor markets to bulk stores to farm share boxes and more, plastic-free does exist, free from greenwashing. You just need to know where to look and be willing to put in a little more effort.

Source Article from https://www.treehugger.com/plastic/problems-amsterdams-plastic-free-grocery-aisle.html

The problems with Amsterdam’s plastic-free grocery aisle

The aisle relies heavily on biodegradable plastics, which have serious drawbacks.

Earlier this winter, a supermarket in Amsterdam called Ekoplaza made headlines for having the first-ever plastic-free aisle. At the time, I wrote enthusiastically, “The aisle features more than 700 food items, including meats, sauces, yogurts, cereals, and chocolate; and, as unbelievable as it sounds, there’s not a speck of plastic in sight — only cardboard, glass, metal, and compostable materials.”

My assessment was not entirely accurate, however, because there was plenty of plastic in sight; it just happened to be made of compostable materials, such as plant cellulose, wood pulp, algae, grass, cornstarch, shrimp shells, etc. It looks like plastic, but is considered different because it’s not not made entirely from fossil fuels and is biodegradable. Some background via The Plastic Planet, which has partnered with Ekoplaza to create the aisle:

“Unlike conventional plastics, which will exist for centuries on our planet, biomaterials are designed to be composted – either in your home compost or in industrial composting facilities. They should be put in the same bin as your food waste, not your plastic recycling bin. All the biomaterial packaging in Ekoplaza Lab is certified as OK Home Compostable or BS EN13432, the key standard for industrial composting across Europe and the UK.”

Ekoplaza store view© Ekoplaza (via Facebook)

Not everyone is impressed by these efforts. Australian zero waste blogger Lindsay Miles is outraged by a plastic free aisle that’s full of plastic lookalikes. She sees the biodegradable plastic solution as seriously lacking because there is so much it fails to address. In an excellent blog post on the topic, she lists the problems with Ekoplaza’s approach. I’ve shared some of her thoughts below and added a few of mine.

1. The language is confusing. A promo video refers to this biodegradable packaging as ‘disappearing’ within 12 weeks, but that is inaccurate: “That’s impossible science. Compost, degrade, dissolve, evaporate – call it what it is. Nothing disappears.” Even the products themselves are confusing; for example, did you know that cellulose tube netting, used to sell oranges and pretty much identical to regular plastic netting, will degrade in a home composter? It’s unlikely that the average shopper would know this, or even try it.

2. There is no resource reduction. A tremendous amount of material is still required to make these biodegradable plastics. Miles writes:

“Growing huge amounts of food (sugar, corn, tapioca) with the sole purpose of synthesizing it into packets so that food items can be neatly displayed with predetermined portions in perfect rows in the supermarket? The land, energy and carbon footprint of that is huge.”

One fact I was especially shocked to learn last year while reading “Life Without Plastic” (book) was that a so-called biodegradable bag only needs to contain 20 percent plant material in order to be labeled as such. The other 80 percent could be fossil fuel-based plastic resins and synthetic additives. This is considered ‘residue.’

3. Compostable is a slippery term. Many of the plant-based plastics in Ekoplaza are compostable in industrial facilities. These are not widely available, or even if they are, they might run for a cycle time that’s shorter than what is needed to compost a particular item.

4. Compostable plastics do not biodegrade in the ocean. Alarm over the ocean plastic problem has driven many of the efforts to go plastic-free and zero waste, and yet these so-called greener products act the same as conventional plastics in water. Miles writes:

“No compostable plastic to date has been shown to break down in the marine environment. As plastic packaging is lightweight, floats, blows in the wind and can be carried by animals, it ends up in the ocean.”

5. This packaging still generates harmful waste. No matter how a plastic bag has been made, it’s just as capable of suffocating an animal, damaging a seagull’s gut, snagging on a sea turtle. These products are impossible to contain, and unless they’re in a proper industrial composting facility, the potential for littering and harm to animals is still there.

I am sure Ekoplaza and its partner, A Plastic Planet, have good intentions, but their approach falls short of what is really needed. It’s too focused on maintaining the status quo, rather than challenging customers to adopt a radically different and more effective shopping model. I do understand the importance of convenience and how this is integral to people minimizing their planetary impact, but there comes a point where we’re going to have to question the way we do things and become used to the idea of taking refillable containers to the store.

There are far better models for plastic-free shopping. From outdoor markets to bulk stores to farm share boxes and more, plastic-free does exist, free from greenwashing. You just need to know where to look and be willing to put in a little more effort.

Source Article from https://www.treehugger.com/plastic/problems-amsterdams-plastic-free-grocery-aisle.html

Dolphins pre-plan their grocery shopping

These coolest of sea creatures know what they’re doing.

Humans figure out what they’re going to eat before they actually acquire said food. (Unless you’re the kind of person who returns from the supermarket with a bunch of flashy, unrelated items that looked intriguing but you have no idea what to do with. I’m looking at you, papayas.) But what about other animals?

Scientists have never known whether dolphins plan their hunting treks ahead of time. It’s tough to track a dolphin underwater; you can’t exactly ask it to put on a data logger. Dolphins are great swimmers; you wouldn’t be able to touch one with a ten-foot pole if it wasn’t in the mood.

So, what’s a curious scientist to do? Use a five-meter-long pole, obviously.

That’s what a group of researchers did when they conducted a study to figure out just how much planning went into dolphin hunts.

“It is really difficult to approach them and attach something to their backs; you need to be very patient!” said Patricia Arranz, a researcher from the University of St. Andrews who used a five-meter-long pole to attach a data logger to a dolphin.

Because the pole had put them in a techy mood, the scientists also operated underwater robots remotely to track nearby squids, or as dolphins call them, lunch.

“In one of the experiments, we were extremely lucky as the group that the tagged animal was in stayed in the same area, allowing us to track the dolphin every time it was at the surface and observe the prey with the echosounder right where and when the dolphin was foraging,” continued Arranz.

The scientists found that the dolphins were definitely planning their hunt ahead of time. They decided where to look for squid based on where they’d found squid in the past. They even planned multiple stops out along the lines of “Hey guys, let’s hit these nearby squids first, and then go for the big haul deep underwater.”

Just one more reason to think dolphins know what they’re doing. And, if “The Simpsons” are right, that they may eventually conquer the planet.

Source Article from https://www.treehugger.com/animals/dolphins-plan-their-grocery-shopping.html

Bill Gates Totally Out Of Touch – Guesses The Price Of Grocery Items

The Microsoft co-founder is currently worth $US91.7 billion, and it’s safe to say that within his household budget is an allowance for someone to do his supermarket shopping for him.

No late night runs to Aldi for milk and chips for Bill Gates. Oh, no no no.

Ellen DeGeneres hilariously demonstrated just how out of touch Gates is with the real world when she had him as a guest on her TV show.

In a segment pleasingly titled “Bill’s grocery bill,” DeGeneres asked Gates to test his knowledge of some everyday items that you buy at the supermarket.

“When was the last time you have been to a supermarket?” DeGeneres asks.

“A long time ago,” admits Gates.

“ … This will be interesting,” deadpans DeGeneres.

The challenge for Gates was to guess the price of three out of five products within a dollar of their recommended retail price.

If he achieved his goal “the audience will get something”, announces DeGeneres, which was met with rapturous applause from the crowd.

Gates got off to a jaw-dropping start by guessing a box of Rice-A-Roni cost $US5.

It costs $US1.

“What a bargain! I’ll take five,” jokes the billionaire awkwardly.

Next up was Tide dishwashing pods. Gates guesses $US4 and then changes his answer to $US10 when the audience gasps.

They cost $US19.97.

“It’s expensive to do laundry,” Ellen explains.

Things look up for Gates when a package of dental floss is revealed as the next item. Gates is an avid flosser it turns out, so he nails this one by guessing $US4 (it costs $US3.78).

But the success is short-lived. The Silicone Valley king really comes unstuck when faced with a bag of Totino’s pizza rolls.

He guesses $US22, which he quickly changes to $US8 after the audience almost falls off their chairs in shock.

They cost $US8.98.

Finally, he is presented with TGI Fridays frozen spinach and artichoke dip. When the audience indicates they think it costs less than $US10, Gates is surprised.

By this point Gates has visibly given up.

 

Source Article from https://worldtruth.tv/bill-gates-totally-out-of-touch-guesses-the-price-of-grocery-items/

Amazon’s Automated Grocery Store of the Future Opens Monday






Amazon’s Automated Grocery Store of the Future Opens Monday


January 21st, 2018

haha

Via: Reuters:

But there have been challenges, according to a person familiar with the matter. These included correctly identifying shoppers with similar body types, the person said. When children were brought into the store during the trial, they caused havoc by moving items to incorrect places, the person added.















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