Monsanto Exec Gets ‘Nobel Peace Prize’ of Food

 

In a blatant act of transgression against the population of the world and real science, the agricultural equivalent to the ‘Nobel Peace Prize’ known as the World Food Prize has been given to a Monsanto executive and two associates for their role in the development of genetically modified crops.

Robert Fraley, the chief technology officer at Monsanto, will be given $250,000 cash along with his prestigious award that was presented at the US State Department on Wednesday. It’s ironic, really, because the US State Department just so happens to also be using our tax dollars to market Monsanto internationally with promotional marketing DVDs and pamphlets. To put it simply, they quite literally act as a marketing wing for Monsanto — the corporation that might as well be a government entity.

It is rather fitting, then, that Monsanto’s executive be adorned with the World Food Prize along with a sack of cash at the headquarters of the Monsanto marketing wing that is the US State Department.

But of course there are also two other scientists being honored for their works against human and environmental health, so it’s important to also identify these corporate scientists as well. First up you have Mary-Dell Chilton, who founder of the rising star biotech company Syngenta, the same great company charged for covering up the fact they knew their own GM corn had been killing animals after consumption. An admission that would ultimately doom their bottom line profits and unveil the reality that Syngenta’s GM crops are indeed unfit for consumption.

As for the third scientist, Marc Van Montagu, he is a European cheerleader for GM crops who founded the Institute of Plant Technology Outreach at Ghent University in Belgium in order to help Monsanto get a stronger foothold in European nations that reject GM crops.

So why have these individuals been given a World Food Prize, especially when over 900 scientists working under the United Nations were forced to admit after extensive research that GMOs lead to decreased yields and are easily outperformed by traditional farming with ease? Probably the same reason that the US government continues to support Monsanto despite complete public disapproval and outcry.

The same conclusion that GM crops cannot feed the world was also reached in the report Failure to Yield following 20 years of research. Nevertheless, the World Food Prize has gone to these manipulators of the food supply in open opposition against human health and sustainability. As to why, the president of the World Food Prize Foundation stated:

“These three scientists are being recognized for their independent, individual breakthrough achievements in founding, developing and applying modern agricultural biotechnology,” said foundation head Kenneth Quinn.

It’s time to stop Monsanto and GMO crops at large. Take part in the Monsanto Video Revolt, an initiative I am launching along with Mike Adams of NaturalNews and Dr. Edward Group of Global Healing Center. It’s time to tell Monsanto to get out and turn activism into legislation. Join the Monsanto Video Revolt right now and get the word out by uploading your videos against Monsanto in online revolution.

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In all but Six States, You Can Be Fired for Being a Victim of Domestic Violence

Last week, Carie Charlesworth, a teacher in California and a victim of domestic violence, was fired from her job because her abusive husband invaded the school parking lot and put the school on lockdown. While her abuser was sent to prison, she was also punished for his crime by losing her employment.

The school’s action -– firing her because she is a victim of domestic abuse –- is sadly legal in most states. Just six, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, New York, Oregon, and Rhode Island, have laws on the books that bar employment discrimination against victims of domestic abuse or sexual assault, according to an up-to-date document tracking these laws from Legal Momentum. State Senators in California introduced a non-discrimination bill in February, which has been referred to committee.

Illinois and Hawaii, as well as New York City and Westchester County, go further to mandate that employers offer victims reasonable accommodations so that they can stay at work: “things like allowing you to change your work telephone number or changing a shift so someone can’t stalk you and find you,” Michelle Caiola, a senior staff attorney at Legal Momentum, told ThinkProgress. Fourteen states protect victims who need to take time off of work to go to counseling, court, or seek medical attention due to their abuse.

For their part, the Bureau of Labor Statistics has found that only about 15 percent of employers have a workplace policy that specifically addresses domestic violence.

The laws are sparse, but the abuse at work is not. One study found that nearly three-quarters of abused women were harassed by their partner while at work. Homicide is a leading cause of workplace deaths for women, second only to roadway incidents.

But discrimination like the kind that Charlesworth experienced can lead victims to shy away from reporting. Of the 4 million workplace crimes committed against women from 1993-1990, less than half were reported to the police.

The loss of a job thanks to abuse can end up cutting off a lifeline to end that abuse. Three-quarters of women report staying with their abuser longer because of economic reasons. “We know that economic abuse is frequent in these situations, and abusers often try to get the victim fired in order to increase her financial dependency on him,” Kim Gandy, president and CEO of the National Network to End Domestic Violence, told ThinkProgress. By showing up at a partner’s workplace, in many states an abuser can put her job at risk, potentially driving her back into his arms.

Beyond the patchwork of state laws, “there is no real protection at the federal level for this,” Caiola said, although bills to provide employment protection are introduced “in every session.” In fact, the Security and Financial Empowerment Act was introduced in the house on March 15, which would bar employers from discriminating against domestic violence or sexual assault victims. The bill has been referred to committee and doesn’t have a vote scheduled.

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How a Community Bill of Rights is Empowering People Against Corporations

A law passed in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, back in 2010 helped established a novel idea: if people have a Bill of Rights on the individual level, what about a set of rights bridging the individual to her or his community? A right to water and clean air, a right to exist in a peaceful environment, a right to sustainable energy.

After all, when thousands of people gather to protest something — fracking, say, in New York state — it is because they see that the law, which favors corporate interests rather than voting constituents, is broken. So, to clarify what belongs in the people’s domain, the public interest law firm Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund coined the term “Community Bill of Rights,” which sets standards at the municipal and county levels that privilege environmental and health concerns over corporate profit.

And they’ve already scored some legislative victories.

“The communities we’re organizing in have come to the recognition that the state and federal governments are forcing things like fracking and pipelines into their communities, and communities don’t have the right to self-govern, to determine if those things should come in,” says Mari Margil, associate director at CELDF. “They realize they don’t have the legal authority to say no to something they perceive as a threat, whether to the natural environment, public health, or the local economy.”

Consider the gas drilling ban that passed in Pittsburgh in 2010, which was modeled on a CELDF proposed ordinance. By labeling the protections part of a Community Bill of Rights, “the light bulb clicked” for former Pittsburgh Councilman Doug Shields, who said it was important to move the conversation from municipal and planning jargon to something everyone could understand: that protecting one’s health and environment is paramount to all other rights.

In the past, said Shields, advocates had used zoning restrictions to try to bar unwanted industrial use from the land. For example, a city could try to restrict how land was leased for its mineral rights. But those legal hurdles weren’t enough. They also begged the question: “Do citizens have the rights or do corporations have the ultimate rights?” he asks.

But the Community Bill of Rights is not a law without risks. Federal rulings trump state rulings, and state rulings do the same to municipal laws. Just look to Jersey City, where a local ordinance banning a controversial natural gas pipeline was overturned by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

Jersey City pointed to numerous pipeline explosions, environmental concerns, risks to future development, and the safety record of the pipeline’s owner, Spectra Energy, which has received numerous fines for failing to properly inspect its pipelines. But FERC saw things differently, and the pipeline is currently under construction even as appeals linger in court.

Still, Shields is hopeful. Despite threats of a lawsuit over the Community Bill of Rights from the fracking industry, none of those cases have materialized.

A representative for the Marcellus Shale Coalition, a group that represents industry interests, did not return numerous phone calls for comment about the novel legislation.

And if the law is challenged, Shields says it could well strengthen public opinion nationally. “Let’s see you win in court,” he said, challenging corporations’ right to sue and take away “these basic rights.”

As Margil put it: “In every state and federal constitution, our governance comes from consent of the governed.”

So far, the communities where CELDF has found the most success are often in rural areas that are dependent on the surrounding environment.

An example is the group’s success last month in Mora County, New Mexico, where the risks of natural gas extraction are more than just an abstract fear. Beset by oil and gas interests on all sides, New Mexico is dependent on these industries for 30 percent of its budget.

Yet Kathleen Dudley, the CELDF representative in the state and also a local farmer, said Mora County only had to look to the consequences of fracking in neighboring communities before it said no thanks. In fact, when Dudley held an educational workshop as part of her work for CELDF, people from counties where fracking and oil extraction were already underway attended to warn the residents of Mora.

“They said, ‘Wake up, Mora, before it’s too late. Don’t let them turn the engines on,” said Dudley. “Industry is winning because [people] don’t know how to empower themselves or their communities, and that’s what CELDF offered us. They said we’ll help you organize and assert your rights.”

To get the word out, CELDF holds what calls Democracy Schools, which are educational seminars that reframe the conversation and help engage citizens with techniques to fend off industry excess. The effort appears to be having some success. In March, CELDF helped Grafton, New Hampshire, narrowly pass a Community Bill of Rights, and Highland Township, Pennsylvania, did the same thing in January.

Last summer, residents in Spokane, Washington began an effort to institute their own Community Bill of Rights.

But the aim is more than just to change the law in certain pockets of the country, where a single unsympathetic court ruling could set a precedent that negates years of hard work. “It’s got to be a people’s movement,” says Margil, who likened the cause of environmental justice to a “Civil Rights movement of today.”

“Washington is not going to do anything until they’re forced to do something,” she added. “We’re focusing on the work we do because we understand pressure has to come out of communities. When we look at past and contemporary movements, they have to be driven upward, not top down.”

Source Article from http://www.nationofchange.org/how-community-bill-rights-empowering-people-against-corporations-1371822426

Ambulance broke down while taking Nelson Mandela to hospital

Posted

June 22, 2013 18:46:07

South Africa says the ambulance that rushed Nelson Mandela to hospital two weeks ago broke down and another had to be called, but the mishap did not endanger the anti-apartheid hero.

The 94-year-old former president is being treated in Pretoria for a lung infection and remains in a serious condition.

Two weeks after he was admitted, it has emerged that the ambulance taking him to hospital has engine trouble on its way to the hospital, which is 55 kilometres from Mr Mandela’s home.

Some local media reports have suggested Mr Mandela was left stranded in the cold for 40 minutes waiting for another ambulance.

But a spokesman for the presidency says doctors are “satisfied” that Mr Mandela suffered no harm during the wait for a replacement vehicle.

“All care was taken to ensure that the former president’s medical condition was not compromised by the unforeseen incident,” presidential spokesman Mac Maharaj said.

Mr Mandela was taken to hospital in the early hours of June 8.

President Thabo Mbeki yesterday said the Nobel Peace Prize laureate is not going to “die tomorrow” despite a growing acceptance among South Africans of his mortality.

AFP/BBC

Topics:
world-politics,
government-and-politics,
person,
community-and-society,
human-interest,
south-africa

Source Article from http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-06-22/ambulance-broke-down-while-taking-nelson-mandela-to-hospital/4773802

The Age tells PM to go for nation’s sake






With one parliament sitting week remaining, there’s fresh pressure on Prime Minister Julia Gillard with the usually supportive Melbourne The Age newspaper urging Prime Minister Julia Gillard to stand aside for the sake of the nation.

Ms Gillard has not commented on the editorial piece and the few Labor MPs making public appearances sought to hose down the speculation.

Opposition leader Tony Abbott said whoever was leader, a divided and dysfunctional Labor still would not provide good government.

In the editorial on Saturday, The Age said the coalition had been allowed to run unchallenged for too long and Ms Gillard had been unable to sell Labor’s landmark reforms to voters who had stopped listening.

It said the government had lost its way and the onus fell on her to break the impasse.

“If it is to be done, it is best done now. But it must be an unequivocal and energising change for the better,” it said.

Ms Gillard’s sole public appearance on Saturday was the official opening ceremony for the Avenue of Honour at Yungaburra, North Queensland, commemorating the 39 Australian soldiers killed in Afghanistan.

Mr Abbott attended the same event, but in earlier media appearances said it was clear whoever led a divided and dysfunctional Labor, it still would not provide good government.

“It’s poisonous inside the party and the sooner they have some time out to rediscover what they stand for, what they believe, who they represent, the better for everyone,” he said.

Mr Abbott did not rule out moving a long-threatened no-confidence motion in parliament but said that would only occur if there was a reasonable prospect of success.

“In the end the Australian people should be choosing the next prime minister not the faceless men. So I rule nothing out and we will respond appropriately in the parliament to whatever happens this week,” he said.

For a no-confidence motion to succeed, the opposition needs the backing of four independents.

Tasmanian independent Andrew Wilkie offered some slight hope, denying media reports he would continue to support Labor no matter who was leader.

“My position is and remains that I’ll decide what to do about any change in the ALP leadership if and when such a change occurs,” he said in a statement.

Attorney General Mark Dreyfus backed the prime minister, declaring she had his absolute support, as did Employment Participation Minister Kate Ellis.

“I have no intention of adding to the speculation, the gossip, the analysis, the dissection of every statement that is made,” she told reporters in Adelaide.



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Canberra memorial honours Afghan fallen


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Memorial honours Aussie soldiers killed in Afghanistan






Thousands of people attended the opening of the Avenue of Honour memorial at Lake Tinaroo at Yungaburra, north of Cairns.

The memorial started out as a personal initiative of the family of Private Ben Chuck, one of three commandoes killed in a helicopter crash in June 2010. On his final journey home, his gun carriage passed along the shore of Lake Tinaroo, south-west of Cairns.

At the opening ceremony of the memorial, Prime Minister Julia Gillard declared the memorial a tribute to the 39 young Australians who died in a dangerous place far from home in the deserts, valleys and mountains of Afghanistan.

She said the memorial is also a special place for the nation to honour all the men and women who have served in Afghanistan.

“I want you to know it is also a place which is very special to me. I attended the funerals of 24 of the Australians whose names will be read today,” she said.

“I met many of you on those dreadful days. I will never forget this memorial here, I will never forget you here today and and most importantly we will remember them.”

Opposition Leader Tony Abbott said all those who wore the Australian uniform had volunteered to take risks many Australians have never had to face.

“We (politicians) feel fumbled even a little embarrassed in the presence of those who we have ordered into battle when we have faced no such dangers ourselves,” he said.

“Our only justification can be absolute necessity for the protection of our nation and our absolute duty is unstinting ceaseless support for those whom we put in harm’s way. Part of that support is honouring the fallen, which we do today, 39 men cut down in their prime.”

Victoria Cross recipient Corporal Ben Roberts-Smith urged people to remember the impact war has on the soldiers who do return home.


“Many men have gone to Afghanistan, many will come home with issues and problems that we cannot forget,” he said.


“We need to remember the sacrifices that have been made. Mateship to me is now about remembering the mates we have lost, and the mates who are going to need our help in the future.”

AUSTRALIA MISSION IN AFGHANISTAN ‘ALMOST COMPLETE’

Meanwhile, Veterans’ Affairs Minister Warren Snowdon has concluded a surprise visit to Afghanistan, declaring Australian troops close to completing their mission.


Mr Snowdon met senior Australian commanders at the main base at Tarin Kowt, as well as Afghan government officials.


He said there were clear indications of the growing capability of Afghan forces who would take full responsibility for security in Oruzgan province at the end of this year.


“Although Australia is close to completing a successful mission in Afghanistan, we remember that 39 young Australians made the ultimate sacrifice and many more have been wounded or otherwise injured. Their sacrifice will never be forgotten,” he said in a statement.


Mr Snowdon said he saw for himself the progress in remediating the base at Tarin Kowt and preparing for redeployment of ADF personnel and equipment back to Australia.


“This is a crucial component of Australia successfully concluding its mission in Oruzgan at the end of this year,” he said.


During the visit, Mr Snowdon told Australian soldiers they had made a tangible and meaningful contribution to the security and future of Afghanistan.


“All Australians should be rightfully proud of the outstanding work done by our servicemen and women on this mission of such importance,” he said.



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Memorial honours soldiers killed in Afghanistan






Thousands of people attended the opening of the Avenue of Honour memorial at Lake Tinaroo at Yungaburra, north of Cairns.

The memorial started out as a personal initiative of the family of Private Ben Chuck, one of three commandoes killed in a helicopter crash in June 2010. On his final journey home, his gun carriage passed along the shore of Lake Tinaroo, south-west of Cairns.

At the opening ceremony of the memorial, Prime Minister Julia Gillard declared the memorial a tribute to the 39 young Australians who died in a dangerous place far from home in the deserts, valleys and mountains of Afghanistan.

She said the memorial is also a special place for the nation to honour all the men and women who have served in Afghanistan.

“I want you to know it is also a place which is very special to me. I attended the funerals of 24 of the Australians whose names will be read today,” she said.

“I met many of you on those dreadful days. I will never forget this memorial here, I will never forget you here today and and most importantly we will remember them.”

Opposition Leader Tony Abbott said all those who wore the Australian uniform had volunteered to take risks many Australians have never had to face.

“We (politicians) feel fumbled even a little embarrassed in the presence of those who we have ordered into battle when we have faced no such dangers ourselves,” he said.

“Our only justification can be absolute necessity for the protection of our nation and our absolute duty is unstinting ceaseless support for those whom we put in harm’s way. Part of that support is honouring the fallen, which we do today, 39 men cut down in their prime.”

Victoria Cross recipient Corporal Ben Roberts-Smith urged people to remember the impact war has on the soldiers who do return home.


“Many men have gone to Afghanistan, many will come home with issues and problems that we cannot forget,” he said.


“We need to remember the sacrifices that have been made. Mateship to me is now about remembering the mates we have lost, and the mates who are going to need our help in the future.”

AUSTRALIA MISSION IN AFGHANISTAN ‘ALMOST COMPLETE’

Meanwhile, Veterans’ Affairs Minister Warren Snowdon has concluded a surprise visit to Afghanistan, declaring Australian troops close to completing their mission.


Mr Snowdon met senior Australian commanders at the main base at Tarin Kowt, as well as Afghan government officials.


He said there were clear indications of the growing capability of Afghan forces who would take full responsibility for security in Oruzgan province at the end of this year.


“Although Australia is close to completing a successful mission in Afghanistan, we remember that 39 young Australians made the ultimate sacrifice and many more have been wounded or otherwise injured. Their sacrifice will never be forgotten,” he said in a statement.


Mr Snowdon said he saw for himself the progress in remediating the base at Tarin Kowt and preparing for redeployment of ADF personnel and equipment back to Australia.


“This is a crucial component of Australia successfully concluding its mission in Oruzgan at the end of this year,” he said.


During the visit, Mr Snowdon told Australian soldiers they had made a tangible and meaningful contribution to the security and future of Afghanistan.


“All Australians should be rightfully proud of the outstanding work done by our servicemen and women on this mission of such importance,” he said.



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Names of Afghan fallen on new memorial


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Thousands attend opening of Avenue of Honour, a memorial to diggers killed in Afghanistan

Updated

June 22, 2013 18:29:06

Australia’s newest war memorial has opened in far north Queensland to honour the 39 diggers who have been killed in Afghanistan.

Thousands of people attended the opening of the Avenue of Honour memorial at Lake Tinaroo at Yungaburra on the Atherton Tablelands.

Private Ben Chuck, one of three commandos killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan in 2010, was from Yungaburra.

His family tirelessly campaigned to raise the $300,000 needed to build the memorial, which many people say is a place of healing and closure.

The memorial was formally opened during a ceremony attended by Defence chief General David Hurley, Prime Minister Julia Gillard and Opposition Leader Tony Abbott.

A roll honour for the soldiers killed in Afghanistan was read out, while doves were released with a hope for peace and wreaths were laid at the memorial by the families of the fallen diggers.

Ms Gillard says soldiers who lose their lives during war should never be forgotten.

“They knew the life of arms and they knew their craft and, above all, they knew what they put at risk when they went away from us,” she said.

“And yet, knowing all that, they did go away. I know you all marvel at their courage.”

She also paid tribute to the families of fallen soldiers, including Gordon and Susan Chuck, the parents of Private Chuck.

“The fruit of your grief could so easily have been bitterness in your lives. Instead, you have created this national memorial to all the sons lost in Afghanistan,” Ms Gillard said.

Victoria Cross recipient Corporal Ben Roberts-Smith urged people to remember the impact war has on the soldiers who do return home.

“Many men have gone to Afghanistan, many will come home with issues and problems that we cannot forget,” he said.

“We need to remember the sacrifices that have been made. Mateship to me is now about remembering the mates we have lost, and the mates who are going to need our help in the future.”

‘Freedom at a terrible price’

Gordon Chuck says the Avenue of Honour is a “living memorial”.

“Although dedicated to the fallen in Afghanistan, I guess it’s a representation of the commitment and courage of the Australian digger over generations,” he said.

“It’s here to remind people that the freedoms and liberties we seem to hold so dearly, and yet often tend to take for granted, come at a terrible price – we mustn’t forget that.

“The Avenue of Honour over the years will constantly remind generations of that fact.”

Mr Chuck, whose son’s funeral was held at Lake Tinaroo, says the project “started with humble beginnings” but then grew to be one of national significance.

“Thousands of people turned up to pay their respects to Benjamin of course, but not just to Benjamin – to all those soldiers that are out there, in this case in Afghanistan and all those that haven’t come back from the conflict,” he said.

“Over the years there’s been lots of suggestions as to what perhaps should be done to mark that occasion. In the end, it was decided that a living memorial, an avenue of trees, should be planted.”

But Mr Chuck says the project quickly “grew tenfold”.

It’s here to remind people that the freedoms and liberties we seem to hold so dearly, and yet often tend to take for granted, come at a terrible price.

“The project has grown enormously, driven by the enthusiasm of firstly the region, the state, and then national interest,” he said.

“It was then that the expectation was for a memorial of national significance and we knew then we had to deliver something of a world standard.

“We had to ensure that our vision could be met in that time, and I’m happy to say the enormous support by so many has enabled us to do just that.”

Mr Chuck says the avenue stretches about 350 metres along the side of the banks of Lake Tinaroo on a peninsula, with a backdrop of water and mountains.

“There are about 70 flame trees planted here and although not mature yet, in the years to come they will flower for three or four months of the year, specifically around November – Remembrance Day,” he said.

“There are plaques for the fallen soldiers on an honour board.”

Mr Chuck says there is underground lighting the whole way down the avenue, a memorial monument and also a monument for the bomb detection dogs.

‘Flight of spirit’

He says there is a 2.6 metre-high shade structure made of beaten steel by a local firm in Cairns in the shape of two “beautiful wings”.

Mr Chuck says one wing is substantially damaged on purpose.

“It’s quite powerful, it’s very strong and the theme is on flight of spirit,” he said.

“The symbolism there is to represent undaunted spirit, which we believe encompasses what these men go to war with.”

Mr Chuck says the avenue has a different strength to other war memorials.

“The great thing about this is it’s here all day and all night, every day and every night, for whoever,” he said.

“Its significance there is its accessibility and its usability by everybody – that I think will be its great strength.

“I think a lot of the returned servicemen, particularly from this conflict, particularly coming both with both internal and external injuries, will choose to come here and enjoy the calm, the tranquillity, and reflect on their mates and themselves and who they are.”

Place of ‘closure’

Sergeant Garry Robinson was one of seven soldiers who survived the Black Hawk helicopter crash that killed Private Chuck, Tim Aplin and Scott Palmer in Kandahar province.

Sergeant Robinson says it has been important for him to visit Private Chuck’s hometown of Yungaburra for the opening.

“He was one of the best members of my team – he was very good,” he said.

“I think it’s for a very good cause for people – not so much the military personnel but more the civilian population – can see what the guys have stood for and what’s represented by them.

“For me personally it’s going to be that one bit of closure that I need to close off – it’s been a long time coming.”

Community contribution

Key contributors to the project included all levels of government and the RSL, as well as the local community.

Kerry Kehoe, the treasurer of the Yungaburra Business Association which helped with the project, remembers Private Chuck as a “great lad”.

” I get emotional thinking about him,” he said.

“His mum and dad have of course been the driving force behind the avenue, but I also stress it really is for all the servicemen in Afghanistan, not just for Ben of course.

“Ben may have been a catalyst and certainly kept the thing going, but it’s a monument for all involved.”

Local Mayor Rosa Lee Long says the memorial has put the Tablelands community on the map, both nationally and internationally.

“We expect that over the coming years we’ll have many a visitor from Australia and overseas, interstate, international,” she said.

“It’ll be a great memorial and remembrance of the services of our people we’ve sent over to Afghanistan.”

Alan Pickering, president for RSL Queensland’s far north district sub-branch, says the memorial is perhaps the only one in Australia dedicated to the Afghanistan conflict.

“The memorial is significant not only to the district, but to the RSL, because it is one of the few – if not the only – Afghanistan memorial in Australia today,” he said.

“It was put together through the wishes and tenacity of a bereaved family – the Chuck family – who have done a tremendous job to get it up to the stage it is now.

“By doing that, it absolutely, totally, meets the guidelines and objectives of the RSL Queensland in as much to nurture the memory of fallen soldiers and the welfare of the people that are left behind.

“It’s that important to us that it rates very highly.”

Battle honours

Mr Chuck also says his son’s 2nd Commando Regiment was this week awarded in Sydney the battle honour of Eastern Shah Wali Kot.

“It was quite emotional, but it was an exceptionally proud time for us, and for the whole unit,” he said.

If Ben was able to comment, I think he’d probably say to me, ‘God dad, what’s all the fuss?’ but I’m sure he’d go back to his mates and say ‘bloody hell, it’s awesome’

“The commendation bestowed on the boys was quite something.

“It was Benny’s birthday on the 18th, the battle honour on the 19th, and the opening of the avenue on the 21st.”

“It’s been a fairly confronting week for us, but one of which we were exceptionally proud.”

Mr Chuck says the Avenue of Honour has meant a great deal to him and his family.

“Personally I found it a very therapeutic exercise – confronting at times,” he said.

“Ben did grow up here – went to school in Atherton, used to kite-surf out here on the lake.

“I think actually if Ben was able to comment, I think he’d probably say to me, ‘God dad, what’s all the fuss?’.

“But I’m sure he’d go back to his mates and say ‘bloody hell, it’s awesome’.”

Topics:
unrest-conflict-and-war,
people,
veterans,
community-development,
regional,
yungaburra-4872,
qld,
australia

First posted

June 22, 2013 14:06:50

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