TUT Broadcast May 27, 2013

islamchristianity

The murder in Great Britain of a soldier by 2 Muslims and its aftermath.

We are joined by our own beloved ‘Digger’ from the UK for a bird’s eye view

Download Here

THANK YOU FOR ASSISTING WITH THE COSTS ASSOCIATED WITH PRODUCING THIS PROGRAM


This entry was posted on May 28, 2013, 12:22 am and is filed under The Ugly Truth Podcast, Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through RSS 2.0.

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Source Article from http://theuglytruth.wordpress.com/2013/05/28/tut-broadcast-may-27-2013/

John McCain Slips Across Border Into Syria, Meets With Rebels

The leaders of the Supreme Military Council of the Free Syrian Army told the senator they want the U.S. to provide arms, a no-fly zone, and strikes on Hezbollah. Josh Rogin reports.

http://www.thedailybeast.com

Sen. John McCain Monday became the highest-ranking U.S. official to enter Syria since the bloody civil war there began more than two years ago, The Daily Beast has learned.

McCain, one of the fiercest critics of the Obama administration’s Syria policy, made the unannounced visit across the Turkey-Syria border with Gen. Salem Idris, the leader of the Supreme Military Council of the Free Syrian Army. He stayed in the country for several hours before returning to Turkey. Both in Syria and Turkey, McCain and Idris met with assembled leaders of Free Syrian Army units that traveled from around the country to see the U.S. senator. Inside those meetings, rebel leaders called on the United States to step up its support to the Syrian armed opposition and provide them with heavy weapons, a no-fly zone, and airstrikes on the Syrian regime and the forces of Hezbollah, which is increasingly active in Syria.

Idris praised the McCain visit and criticized the Obama administration’s Syria policy in an exclusive interview Monday with The Daily Beast.

“The visit of Senator McCain to Syria is very important and very useful especially at this time,” he said. “We need American help to have change on the ground; we are now in a very critical situation.”

Fighting across Syria has increased in recent weeks, with new regime offensives in several key areas, such as Damascus and the strategic border town of Qusayr. Thousands of soldiers serving Hezbollah—the Lebanon-based and Iran- and Syria-backed stateless army—have joined the fight in support of the regime, as the civil war there has threatened to ignite a region-wide conflagration and amid new reports of chemical weapons attacks by forces loyal to embattled president Bashar al-Assad this week that might cross President Obama’s “red line” for the conflict.

McCain’s visit came as the Obama administration is once again considering an increase of support to the Syrian opposition, while at the same time pushing the opposition council to negotiate with the regime at an international conference in Geneva in early June.

How do John McCain and his colleagues feel about the war in Syria?

“What we want from the U.S. government is to take the decision to support the Syrian revolution with weapons and ammunition, anti-tank missiles and anti-aircraft weapons,” Idris said. “Of course we want a no-fly zone and we ask for strategic strikes against Hezbollah both inside Lebanon and inside Syria.”

There’s no assurance the Obama administration will be able to convince the Syrian opposition to attend the Geneva conference, and Idris said the conference would only be useful if there are certain preconditions, which the regime is unlikely to agree to.

“We are with Geneva if it means that [Syrian President] Bashar [al Assad] will resign and leave the country and the military officials of the regime will be brought to justice,” he said.

“We need American help to have change on the ground; we are now in a very critical situation.”
Prior to his visit inside Syria, McCain and Idris had separate meetings with two groups of FSA commanders and their Civil Revolutionary Council counterparts in the Turkish city of Gaziantep. Rebel military and civilians leaders from all over Syria came to see McCain, including from Homs, Qusayr, Idlib, Damascus, and Aleppo. Idris led all the meetings.

The entire trip was coordinated with the help of the Syrian Emergency Task Force, an American nonprofit organization that works in support of the Syrian opposition. Two leaders of the group attended all of the McCain-Idris meetings and discussed them with The Daily Beast.

The rebel troops are running low on ammunition and don’t have effective weapons to counter the regime’s use of airpower, the FSA and civilian leaders told McCain. They also said there’s a growing presence of Russian military advisers in Damascus as well as growing numbers of Iranian and Iraqi fighters.

Hezbollah has taken over the fight for the regime in Homs, they said. Estimates of Hezbollah’s presence there ranged from four to seven thousand fighters in and around city, outnumbering the approximately two thousand FSA fighters in the area.

The rebels also told McCain that chemical weapons have been used by the regime on multiple occasions.

“This was the start of a really important engagement between various forces in the U.S. government and people in the civilian and armed opposition who are working together to fight for a free Syria,” said Elizabeth O’Bagy, political director of the Syrian Emergency Task Force.

“Senator McCain proved today you can very easily go and meet with these people,” she said. “He’s the first U.S. senator to step foot in free Syria and one of the first government officials to reach out to the FSA officials and that’s a huge step.”

U.S. Ambassador Robert Ford is the only other high-ranking U.S. official to have entered Syria recently. He visited while on a trip to Turkey earlier this month.

The rebel leaders were appreciative of McCain’s visit but took the opportunity to communicate their unhappiness with what they see as a lack of crucial support from the Obama administration at a critical time in their struggle.

“They voiced their frustration at the policy of the U.S., because they believe that it’s in the interest of both the U.S. and Syria for the right people to be armed,” said Mouaz Moustafa, the Task Force’s executive director. “We need to increase the frequency of these types of visits by senior-level policy makers. It’s the best way to know who we are arming and to know who we are really dealing with.”

McCain, who also visited a U.S. Patriot missile site and met with U.S. forces there while in Turkey, declined to comment for this story. In an unrelated interview last week, he told The Daily Beast that he was concerned that the Geneva conference would only serve to give the regime more time to strengthen its military position against the rebels.

“I’ve been known to be an optimist, but here are the Russians sending them up-to-date missiles, continued flights of arms going into Syria, Putin keeps our secretary of State waiting for three hours … It doesn’t lend itself to optimism, all it does is delay us considering doing what we really need to do,” said McCain. “The reality is that Putin will only abandon Assad when he thinks that Assad is losing. Right now, at worst it’s a stalemate. In the view of some, he is succeeding.”

Source Article from http://theuglytruth.wordpress.com/2013/05/27/john-mccain-slips-across-border-into-syria-meets-with-rebels/

US spy device tested on public in other countries

By David Fisher | The New Zealand Herald



A high-tech United States surveillance tool which sweeps up all communications without a warrant was sent to New Zealand for testing on the public, according to an espionage expert.


The tool was called ThinThread and it worked by automatically intercepting phone, email and internet information.


ThinThread was highly valued by those who created it because it could handle massive amounts of intercepted information. It then used snippets of data to automatically build a detailed picture of targets, their contacts and their habits for the spy organisation using it.


Those organisations were likely to include the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB) after Washington, DC-based author Tim Shorrock revealed ThinThread was sent to New Zealand for testing in 2000-2001.


Mr Shorrock, who has written on intelligence issues for 35 years, said the revolutionary ThinThread surveillance tool was sent to New Zealand by the US National Security Agency. The GCSB is the US agencys intelligence partner – currently under pressure for potentially illegal wide-spread spying on the public.


The claim ThinThread was sent to New Zealand has brought fresh calls for the bureau to explain what it does.


A spokesman said the bureau was currently reviewing how much it did tell the public – but it would not be making comment on the ThinThread test. He said the intelligence agency “wont confirm or deny” the claim because it was an “operational” matter.


A spokeswoman for Prime Minister John Key also refused to comment saying it was an operational matter.


The claim emerged in an article by Mr Shorrock which ran in a magazine last month and featured whistleblower William Binney – a former high-ranking NSA official who designed ThinThread.


Mr Shorrock said the “ThinThread prototype” was installed at two NSA listening posts in late 2000 and at Fort Meade where the NSA is based.


“In addition, several allied foreign intelligence agencies were given the program to conduct lawful surveillance in their own corners of the world. Those recipients included Canada, Germany, Britain, Australia and New Zealand.”


The “lawful” aspect was due to the softwares ability to mask the identities of those whose information was being intercepted – a technical work around of the legal barrier which prohibits New Zealand and the US from spying on its own citizens.


Mr Shorrock said ThinThread operated in three phases. It began by intercepting call, email and internet traffic on a network and automatically assessing it for interest. The scale of the traffic was such that it narrowed down targets of interest by focusing on patterns of information rather than the content of the information.


Secondly, ThinThread automatically anonymised the collected data so the identities stayed hidden “until there was sufficient evidence to obtain a warrant”.


The magic was in the back end of the system which used the raw data “to create graphs showing relationships and patterns that could tell analysts which targets they should look at and which calls should be listened to” using “metadata” – the same type of “information about information” which featured in about 60 of the 88 potentially illegal spying cases identified in the GCSB review.


The Greens and Labour both said it showed the need for an inquiry into the GCSB – an investigation which both have repeatedly demanded. Greens co-leader Russel Norman said the Prime Minister and GCSB needed to explain to the public whether it was spied on by ThinThread.


“It reinforces why there is a different set of rules for the GCSB – they are integrated into this global spy network,” he said.


Article from: nzherald.co.nz

ThinThread:

The program would have used a technique of encrypting sensitive privacy information in order to comply with legal concerns, and would have automatically identified potential threats. The sources of the data for this program would have included “massive phone and e-mail data,” but the extent of this information is not clear. […]


The Pentagon report concluded that ThinThreads ability to sort through data in 2001 was far superior to that of another NSA system in place in 2004, and that the program should be launched and enhanced. ThinThread was designed to address two key challenges: One, the NSA had more information than it could digest, and, two, increasingly its targets were in contact with people in the United States whose calls the agency was prohibited from monitoring. Source



Tune into Red Ice Radio:


Frank OCollins – Hour 1 – The Rise of Nihilism & The Apex of World Control


Joseph P. Farrell – Hour 1 – Fake Terrorism, Covert Wars & ET Threat Assessment


Daniel Estulin – The Octopus Deception, WikiLeaks & Bilderberg


Patrick Henningsen – Hour 1 – Boston Bombings & Third Way Control Mechanism


Kenn Thomas – PROMIS Software, Danny Casolaro & The Octopus


Holland Vandennieuwenhof & James Lane – Hour 1 – A Noble Lie: Oklahoma City 1995


Peter Dale Scott – Hour 1 – Norways Massacre, Breivik & Deep Events


John Hall – Satellite Terrorism, Surveillance Technology, Implantable Microchips & Biometric ID Cards


Charles Farrier – No CCTV, Campaign Against Big Brother Camera Surveillance


H.P. Albarelli Jr. – Project MKULTRA, LSD, CIA, Dr. Sidney Gottlieb & Occult Government Studies

Source Article from http://redicecreations.com/article.php?id=25311

Bring Jordan Page to Freedom Fest Fundraiser

 
Freedom Forum  
News Links  
Feature Articles  
Opinions  
Reference Links  
Writers
Front Page  
About Us  
Contact Us  
Link To Us  
Terms of Use  
Privacy Policy  
Writer Log-in

FreedomsPhoenix.com
The domain and name of this website are servicemarks of Ernest Hancock.
Website is Copyright © 2013 by Ernest Hancock.  All rights reserved worldwide.
Feature articles, columns, illustrations, and photographs are copyrighted and may not be
reproduced without the expressed permission of the credited writer, artist, or photographer.
No portion of this website, text, images, or source code may be framed on another website,
copied, reproduced, or distributed, by any means, without the written permission of
Ernest Hancock, 4886 W Port Au Prince Ln, Glendale, AZ 85306 USA.
 

Source Article from http://www.freedomsphoenix.com/News/135347-2013-05-27-bring-jordan-page-to-freedom-fest-fundraiser.htm?EdNo=001&From=RSS

The $1.3B Quest to Build a Supercomputer Replica of a Human Brain

 
Freedom Forum  
News Links  
Feature Articles  
Opinions  
Reference Links   =a(href="http://www.FreedomsPhoenix.com/Writers-List.htm?EdNo=001">Writers
Front Page  
About Us  
Contact Us  
Link To Us  
Terms of Use  
Privacy Policy  
Writer Log-in

FreedomsPhoenix.com
The domain and name of this website are servicemarks of Ernest Hancock.
Website is Copyright © 2013 by Ernest Hancock.  All rights reserved worldwide.
Feature articles, columns, illustrations, and photographs are copyrighted and may not be
reproduced without the expressed permission of the credited writer, artist, or photographer.
No portion of this website, text, images, or source code may be framed on another website,
copied, reproduced, or distributed, by any means, without the written permission of
Ernest Hancock, 4886 W Port Au Prince Ln, Glendale, AZ 85306 USA.
 

Source Article from http://www.freedomsphoenix.com/News/135345-2013-05-27-the-1-3b-quest-to-build-a-supercomputer-replica-of.htm?EdNo=001&From=RSS

Houston police shut down Kanye West’s screening for racially-charged music video New Slaves

 
Freedom Forum  
News Links  
Feature Articles  
Opinions  
Reference Links  
Writers
Front Page  
About Us  
Contact Us  
Link To Us  
Terms of Use  
Privacy Policy  
Writer Log-in

FreedomsPhoenix.com
The domain and name of this website are servicemarks of Ernest Hancock.
Website is Copyright © 2013 by Ernest Hancock.  All rights reserved worldwide.
Feature articles, columns, illustrations, and photographs are copyrighted and may not be
reproduced without the expressed permission of the credited writer, artist, or photographer.
No portion of this website, text, images, or source code may be framed on another website,
copied, reproduced, or distributed, by any means, without the written permission of
Ernest Hancock, 4886 W Port Au Prince Ln, Glendale, AZ 85306 USA.
 

Source Article from http://www.freedomsphoenix.com/News/135344-2013-05-27-houston-police-shut-down-kanye-wests-screening-for-racially-charged.htm?EdNo=001&From=RSS

Oh, by the Way, to all R3VOL here? Y’all are CRAZY!

 
Freedom Forum  
News Links  
Feature Articles  
Opinions  
Reference Links  
Writers
Front Page  
About Us  
Contact Us  
Link To Us  
Terms of Use  
Privacy Policy  
Writer Log-in

FreedomsPhoenix.com
The domain and name of this website are servicemarks of Ernest Hancock.
Website is Copyright © 2013 by Ernest Hancock.  All rights reserved worldwide.
Feature articles, columns, illustrations, and photographs are copyrighted and may not be
reproduced without the expressed permission of the credited writer, artist, or photographer.
No portion of this website, text, images, or source code may be framed on another website,
copied, reproduced, or distributed, by any means, without the written permission of
Ernest Hancock, 4886 W Port Au Prince Ln, Glendale, AZ 85306 USA.
 

Source Article from http://www.freedomsphoenix.com/News/135343-2013-05-27-oh-by-the-way-to-all-r3vol-here-yall-are.htm?EdNo=001&From=RSS

Glitch in widely used polygraph can skew results

McGee

Google+  FB Share  

Washington – Police departments and federal agencies across the country are using a type of polygraph despite evidence of a technical problem that could label truthful people as liars or the guilty as innocent, McClatchy has found.

As a result, innocent people might have been labeled criminal suspects, faced greater scrutiny while on probation or lost out on jobs. Or, just as alarming, spies and criminals may have escaped detection.

The technical glitch produced errors in the computerized measurements of sweat in one of the most popular polygraphs, the LX4000. Although polygraphers first noticed the problem a decade ago, many government agencies hadn’t known about the risk of inaccurate measurements until McClatchy recently raised questions about it.

The manufacturer, Lafayette Instrument Co. Inc., described the phenomenon as “occasional” and “minor,” but it couldn’t say exactly how often it occurs. Even after one federal agency became concerned and stopped using the measurement and a veteran polygrapher at another witnessed it repeatedly change test results, the extent and the source of the problem weren’t independently studied nor openly debated. In the meantime, tens of thousands of Americans were polygraphed on the LX4000.

The controversy casts new doubt on the reliability and usefulness of polygraphs, which are popularly known as lie detectors and whose tests are banned for use as evidence by most U.S. courts. Scientists have long questioned whether polygraphers can accurately identify liars by interpreting measurements of blood pressure, sweat activity and respiration. But polygraphers themselves say they rely on the measurements to be accurate for their daily, high-stakes decisions about people’s lives.

“We’re talking about using a procedure that has a very weak scientific foundation and making it worse,” said William Iacono, a University of Minnesota psychology professor who’s researched polygraph testing. “I already don’t have very much confidence in how government agencies conduct these tests. Now, they might as well be flipping a coin.”

Despite the scientific skepticism, intelligence and law enforcement agencies see polygraph as useful in obtaining confessions to wrongdoing that wouldn’t otherwise be uncovered. Fifteen federal agencies and many police departments across the country rely on polygraph testing to help make hiring or firing decisions. Sex offenders and other felons often undergo testing to comply with probation or court-ordered psychological treatment. Police detectives and prosecutors rule out criminal suspects who pass and scrutinize those who don’t.

In its ongoing series about polygraph use by government agencies, McClatchy found that such testing has flourished despite being banned for use by most private employers 25 years ago. For federal jobs alone, more than 70,000 people are polygraphed each year, and most can’t challenge the results in court or allege abusive tactics. While supporters say accuracy can be 85 to 95 percent, polygraphs aren’t required to meet any independent testing standards to verify the accuracy of their measurements, unlike medical or other computerized equipment.

The concerns about the LX4000 only add to the criticism.

“If you buy all of the propositions that the physiological measurements are a reliable proxy for truth telling or deception, then the whole premise depends upon a machine that can precisely record those measurements,” said Gene Iredale, a San Diego attorney. “If you don’t have that, then you have a hope piled on a speculation, and on top of it all an error-filled system.”

In the absence of an independent assessment, polygraphers depend on the federal government, the manufacturer or one another to be notified of a problem with the technology. Many polygraphers, however, told McClatchy they didn’t know about the possibility of inaccurate measurements or that they could occur in other polygraphs that use the same technology.

“If this was being debated, I would have liked to have known about it,” said Danny Fields, the supervisor of the Kansas City Missouri Police Department’s polygraph section, which used the LX4000 for years before replacing it with a newer Lafayette model. “I believe in polygraph 100 percent, but I want to make sure it’s working like it’s supposed to be working.”

Polygraph

Google+  FB Share  

Polygraphs chart out blood pressure, breathing rate and sweat production to help an examiner determine whether a subject may be lying. The LX4000, produced by Lafayette Instrument, displays both raw sweat production data and an adjusted chart designed to be easier to read. There are concerns that the adjusted chart, produced in “auto” mode may be introducing inaccuracies.

The polygraph profession is highly secretive, and many agencies cite national security or law enforcement interests as barring them from answering questions. Of 63 federal, local and state agencies contacted by McClatchy, only 40 would say what types of machines they used. Of those, 27 state and local agencies said they either currently use or have used the LX4000, including big city police departments such as New York, Chicago and Los Angeles. None of those agencies said they were reviewing their previous tests for errors, although some people who’d failed polygraph tests said they thought they’d been inaccurately labeled. Ten federal agencies have used Lafayette polygraphs.

“I’m astounded that a government agency would rely on this machine to make any decision,” said John Stauffer, a Chicago accountant who was denied an FBI job in 2011 because he didn’t pass his polygraph test. “I’ve always known that I shouldn’t have failed. Now I wonder whether this was the problem.”

Scientists have experimented for more than a century with running a minuscule amount of electricity through sweat glands in the fingertips as a way to gauge emotions and mental effort. In the past two decades, however, polygraphs marketed to government agencies have changed the way perspiration is measured.

As a result, the LX4000 measures sweat in two ways. One method, known as the manual mode, directly measures the secretions from sweat glands, as scientists traditionally have done. The other, known as the automatic mode, electronically filters the measurements and is designed to smooth out the sometimes erratic graphic representations and make them easier to interpret.

David Reisinger, a veteran federal polygrapher, said he first witnessed a problem with the LX4000 in 2005, while discussing a test with a Lafayette employee by phone. When he switched between the two modes, he noticed a difference in the measurements.

“It was so significant I noticed the problem immediately,” said Reisinger, a polygrapher at the Defense Intelligence Agency at the time. “It jumped right off the screen at me.”

Reisinger pressed the company to look into it because he saw it could change the outcome of a test depending on the setting. Polygraphers assign numbers to sweat measurements and add them up for a final score that’s supposed to show whether someone is lying. In a test where one point can make a difference, Reisinger documented up to a 16-point difference between the two modes.

He notified his supervisors, and Lafayette pledged to fix it. Years and dozens of examples later, the company still hadn’t, he said.

“What troubled me is that they couldn’t tell me which measurement was accurate,” he said.

The Air Force’s Office of Special Investigations noticed a problem as early as 2002, the year the LX4000 hit the market. A spokeswoman said her law enforcement agency was concerned that it could change the outcome of tests, and sought out Lafayette officials.

“They recommended that all polygraph charts be collected in the manual mode,” spokeswoman Linda Card said in a statement. “As a result of the possible flaw in the automatic mode, we, as an organization, directed the use of only the manual mode” during testing.

The manufacturer’s advice apparently didn’t reach other government agencies.

“This is news to me,” Reisinger said. “The manufacturer never told us that.”

Instead, Lafayette described the problem to the Defense Intelligence Agency as “minor” and repairable. In one email , then -Lafayette Operations Manager Mark Lane told the agency in 2007 that company officials felt “extremely confident” they could fix it, adding that they had “devoted our entire engineering efforts” to fixing the automatic mode.

“We certainly agree that this is an issue that needs to be resolved,” he told DIA officials.

Word of the problem spread unofficially. At one point, a CIA employee called Reisinger to request information about the issue. He sent along what he knew.

In 2009, Reisinger told his bosses that he’d seen several software updates and none of them appeared to fix the problem. By then, he’d become an official who reviewed tests to make sure polygraphers were complying with federal standards. He recommended that the Defense Intelligence Agency stop using the LX4000. The DIA, which decided not to switch machines, refused to comment for this story.

“I felt the manufacturer had given us the runaround and was never completely straightforward about what was going on,” Reisinger said. “I didn’t think we could trust them anymore.”

According to a 2002 federal training document, Lafayette advised polygraphers to use the automatic mode, although the company now says it doesn’t recommend one mode over the other.

“Lafayette Instrument Company . . . has helped customers to select technology and procedures that best serve their objectives,” the company said in a statement.

After a McClatchy reporter asked about the problem, Lafayette sent a notice to customers in March acknowledging that a difference in measurements could occur but described it as a “rare” phenomenon that it had attempted to eliminate with improvements to its machines. The company pledged to test its polygraphs to determine the extent of the problem, although it added in a statement to McClatchy that “anecdotal experience tells us that different . . . modes are in agreement most of the time.”

Lafayette, meanwhile, has been marketing a new model, the LX5000, that it said has the same “potential for occasional differences,” like any polygraph that has an automatic mode.

When McClatchy asked the manufacturer why it hadn’t sent out a notice earlier, officials responded that it was “not productive” to discuss such a question.

“In this case, it is impossible to speculate about ‘why’ because what you perceived as a newly discovered ‘problem’ is actually a known” phenomenon,Lafayette wrote to a reporter.

Gary Berntson, an Ohio State University professor of psychology who’s studied such sweat measurements, agreed with the company that differences in measurements were likely a rare occurrence.

“But the cost of such an outcome to the individual could be huge,” said Berntson, a former consultant to Lafayette. “The crux here is proper disclosure. The manufacturer needs to alert the user of potential biases, however subtle or rare.”

Charles Honts, a psychology professor with Boise State University who’s also researched polygraph, questioned why the manufacturer or the federal government didn’t weigh in with clearer guidance since both witnessed the problem repeatedly.

Honts and several other scientists who research polygraph previously warned government agencies not to rely only on the automatic mode because research had shown the risk of errors in that measurement in any polygraph.

“The insidious thing is that this phenomenon biases tests against the innocent, and the government knows that,” said Honts, who’s worked on research for a Lafayette competitor. “This is just another example of science being ignored.”

In fact, Lafayette sent McClatchy documents of what it described as evidence that the same problem occurs in an unnamed competitor’s polygraphs, but it asserted “the examples provided . . . are in fact not common whether using our instrument or those (of) our competitors.”

One competitor, Limestone Technologies Inc., has made public assertions that its polygraph measurements are better than Lafayette’s.

Scientists, however, said it was impossible to know whether one company’s polygraph is better than another’s without independent testing, adding that the problem with differences between the two modes was likely made worse by bad practices. Many agencies use stainless steel electrodes without the recommended gel for measuring the sweat, which could yield erratic readings in the more reliable manual mode. As a result, polygraphers might be tempted to turn to the automatic mode, which is viewed as easier to interpret.

“We’ve been saying this for 30 years,” said John Kircher, a researcher and psychology professor at the University of Utah who helped invent one of the earliest computerized polygraphs in 1979. “But no one seems to be listening.”

The National Center for Credibility Assessment, the federal polygraph training academy, declined to comment, citing national security concerns.

The FBI, Secret Service, Customs and Border Protection, Drug Enforcement Administration, State Department and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives also refused to comment, but federal records show they’ve contracted to buy Lafayette’s polygraphs, often without competitive bidding. According to company and government documents, a new LX5000 can range from $3,200 to $9,500. The CIA and the National Reconnaissance Office also have used the company’s polygraphs, but those contracting records are kept secret and officials there wouldn’t comment.

Several police departments, however, said they weren’t disturbed by the news because they hadn’t noticed inaccurate measurements. Tommy Thompson, spokesman for the Phoenix Police Department, said his polygraphers had “over 60 years of experience collectively” and added that “no disparities have ever been noticed.” Others said they thought supervisors would catch any error before it had a significant impact on a test.

But Phoenix and many other government agencies generally rely on the automatic mode. As a result, veteran polygraphers would be unlikely to notice any difference between the two measurements, even if it were occurring routinely.

“If you don’t flip to the other mode, you’d be oblivious to the fact that it’s even different,” Reisinger said.

Scientists said the federal government and manufacturers should be warning polygraphers about the technological pitfalls. Iacono conducted his own laboratory tests of older Lafayette machines in the 1990s and didn’t find any issue with their earlier measurements. In fact, he found the machines to be as good as scientific equipment that cost much more.

“Because of that, I have never criticized the actual measurements, and I’ve always thought they’ve only made them better,” Iacono said. “What this shows is that they’ve actually made them worse and they can’t fix the problem.”

Source Article from http://www.sott.net/article/262185-Glitch-in-widely-used-polygraph-can-skew-results

Germany now recording coldest spring in 40 years! "…Climate experts running out of arguments…"!

The recent weather in Germany indicates everything but global warming and widespread drought, which climate experts have been telling us would be the case unless we stopped burning fossil fuels fast.

Germany's Mean Temps

Google+  FB Share  

Today the online Augsburger Allgemeine reports that the statistics for the 2013 German meteorological spring (March-April-May) have been 95% tabulated and show that this year’s German spring is the “coldest in in decades“. The Chiemgau24 news site reports that it is the coldest spring in 40 years.

This past weekend, snow even fell in parts of Germany at elevations down to 600 meters.

No reasons are cited as to why the spring 2013 is so cold. The Arctic is covered with ice and so it can’t be an exposed Arctic sea disrupting atmospheric patterns.

Chiemgau24 writes (my emphasis):

March was too cold, April was a little warmer than normal, and May will likely wind up a little colder than normal. […]

Five colder than normal winters in a row, the coldest March in decades (in the northeast in 130 years) and now the coldest spring in over 40 years…if that doesn’t lead some climate experts to run out of arguments…”

The Chiemgau24 quotes meteorologist Dominik Jung concerning models:

‘Here the long-term weather models from some international weather services had indicated a “warmer than average and sunny April and May”. But we got just the opposite. On Sunday morning it even snowed again down to 600 meters elevation,’ explained Meteorologist Dominik Jung of the weather portal www.wetter.net.

‘Currently the mean temperature for spring 2013 (calculated from March 1 to May 25) is at 6.1°C. That’s the coldest spring in decades. It’s been more than 40 years since it’s been that cold. In 1970 the average temperature for spring was only 6.0°C,’ explains weather expert Jung.”

This might be a good time for the German Weather Service to think about dropping it’s long outdated temperature chart logo at the header of its website.

Source Article from http://www.sott.net/article/262184-Germany-now-recording-coldest-spring-in-40-years-Climate-experts-running-out-of-arguments